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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Twelfth Annual Lecture March 22 1990 The T Cell Repertoire Dr Philippa Marrack Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Denver Thirteenth Annual Lecture April 18 1991 The Steroid recpetor Superfamily Dr Ronald M Evans The Salk Institute San Diego Fourteenth Annual Lecture April 30 1992 Molecular Basis of Leukocyte Localization in Inflammation Dr Timothy A Springer Harvard Medical School Fifteenth Annual Lecture May 20 1993 Telomeres and Their Synthesis Dr Elizabeth H Blackburn University of California San Francisco Sixteenth Annual Lecture May 12 1994 The Erythropoietin Receptor Structure Signaling and Tumorigenesis Dr Harvey F Lodish Massachusetts Institute of Technology Seventeenth Annual Lecture February 23 1995 Signaling Genes from the Cell Surface The JAK STAT Pathway Dr James E Darnell Jr The Rockefeller University Eighteenth Annual Lecture May 2 1996 Analysis of Developmental Processes in the Immune System by Mutation Dr Klaus Rajewsky University of Cologne Nineteenth Annual Lecture March 13 1997 Life in the Cytoplasm Tales of a DNA Virus Dr Bernard Moss NIAID National Institutes of Health Twentieth Annual Lecture April 23 1998 Host Factors in the Pathogenesis of HIV Disease Dr Anthony S Fauci NIAID National Institutes of Health Twenty First Annual Lecture March 11 1999 Downstream Views Tracing Oncogenic Signals Dr Peter K Vogt The Scripps Research Institute Twenty Second Annual Lecture March 15 2000 Fidelity and Infidelity in the Commitment to Differentiation of Hemato lymphopoietic Cell Lineages Dr Fritz Melchers Basel Institute for Immunology Twenty Third Annual Lecture February 28 2001 Vaccinology in Historic and Contemporary Perspective Dr Maurice R Hilleman Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research Twenty Fourth Annual Lecture March 6 2002 Cell Mediated Immunity in Virus Infections Dr Peter Doherty St Jude Children s Research Hospital Twenty Fifth Annual Lecture March 15 2003 Warts Cancer and Ubiquitination Lessons from the Papillomaviruses Dr Peter Howley Harvard

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/seminars/mcginnis.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    interest is to understand how these obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens manipulate host cellular functions to replicate disseminate and ultimately cause disease Chlamydia trachomatis resides within a membrane bound compartment inclusion From this location the pathogen manipulates the actin cytoskeleton microtubule based motors inhibits lysosomal recognition of the inclusion activates signaling pathways re routes lipid transport and prevents the onset of programmed cell death Remarkably all of these functions are achieved

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/valdivia/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    program in virology service in founding the American Society for Virology and for his editorial work for the journal Virology and the seminal text Zinsser s Microbiology Together with the Nobel Laureate Paul Berg Dr Joklik was responsible for the discovery of the enzyme terminal transferase Dr Joklik was the first to examine the mechanism of action of interferon the first cytokine to be recognized in molecular terms in 1964 and was recently conferred an honorary member of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research Much of his scientific career was devoted to the development and application of molecular virology with a focus on reovirus and vaccinia Many alumni who trained in his laboratory are leading investigators in biomedical research including Joseph Nevins PhD who is the Barbara Levine University Professor of Breast Cancer Genomics Dr Joklik is currently a James B Duke Professor Emeritus of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology a member of the National Academy of Sciences and an active member of the community List of Speakers First Annual Lecture September 25 2010 Poxviruses do it all in the cytoplasm Dr Bernard Moss National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Second Annual Lecture September 23 2011 Positive strand

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/seminars/joklik.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    of C gattii occurring in the United States In the Heitman lab I researched population structures molecular epidemiology and virulence variations in the emerging fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii My major areas of focus were in the VGI molecular type with a particular emphasis on the analysis of a specific genotype seen in Australia and the United States the expansion of the 1999 VGII molecular type outbreak from Vancouver Island into the Pacific Northwest region of the United States and on a VGIII molecular type outbreak occurring in HIV patients from Southern California Research on the VGI group was initiated through the analysis of the first reported clinical case of C gattii in North Carolina which showed a unique genotype specific to a clinical case in California and a clinical case as well as several environmental isolates from Australia Through collaborations with Dr Dee Carter from the University of Sydney we developed new molecular markers based on microsatellites combined with conserved genomic regions to address possible differences within this specific genotype Studies on the VGII group are specifically focused on the molecular epidemiology and virulence analyses of recent clinical and veterinary cases in the United States Pacific Northwest with a focus on the Oregon and Washington populations The work in the Pacific NW has been facilitated by clinical collaborations with Dr Kieren Marr of Johns Hopkins University and veterinary collaborations with Dr Robert Bildfell chief pathologist at the Oregon State University veterinary diagnostic laboratory The VGIII outbreak project is focused on virulence of unique VGIII genotypes population genetics and roles of mating and fertility This is part of an ongoing collaboration with Dr Vishnu Chaturvedi associate professor at the Wadsworth Center I am currently a Post Doctoral Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine References Lee S Corradi N

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/heitman/lab/byrnes.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    investigated the ultrasonic enhancement of degradative enzymes on cellulosic substrates in an effort to make ethanol fuel production from cellulose more economically viable I joined the Heitman lab in August 2008 as a research technician to gain more lab experience and supplement my undergraduate education before entering graduate school Outside of the lab rock climbing taking care of my two dogs and dreaming of travel destinations fills my free time

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/heitman/lab/lewit.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    example as microbial pathogens enter the microenvironment of the infected host dramatic genetic and phenotypic events occur that allow these organisms to survive in this harsh environment We study the model fungal organism Cryptococcus neoformans to elucidate signal transduction pathways associated with fungal pathogenicity This important human pathogen displays well characterized and inducible virulence determinants It also offers an excellent genetic system to study microbial pathogenesis Importantly the genome of this fungus is now being sequenced Such attributes make it an ideal system for dissecting the signaling pathways associated with pathogenicity The main techniques used in our lab are those of molecular genetics We are now able to readily clone C neoformans genes and to disrupt them by homologous recombination Mutant strains with disruptions in targeted genes are then evaluated in vitro for various mutant phenotypes including altered expression of virulence determinants such as polysaccharide capsule and melanin The effects of gene disruption on pathogenicity are also evaluated in various animal models of systemic cryptococcal disease Using these techniques we have demonstrated that conserved signal transduction pathways have been co opted by pathogens to enable parasitism of the host For example we recently identified a novel G alpha protein cAMP

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/alspaugh/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    E cuniculi as well as drug tolerance in the human pathogenic species Mucor circinelloides I am originally from Ebensburg PA and I received my B S in Biology at Juniata College in Huntingdon PA While there I did research on a streptococcal cysteine protease called IdeS with Dr Michael Boyle Here at Duke University I work in Joseph Heitman s lab investigating new methods to genetically transform a microsporidian species

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/shertz.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished Mitchell was selected for his distinguished contributions to the field of microbial pathogenesis elucidating fungal immune cell interactions population structures of human pathogens and how sex enables pathogen emergence This honor can be considered a validation of years of research by an independent body of prominent scientists Mitchell said More significantly this recognition is a testament to the exciting research environment here at Duke

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/mitchell.htm (2014-06-13)
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