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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    my B S in Molecular Biology at the University of California San Diego in 2008 Much of my scientific experience before coming to Duke was in plant systems working on a variety of projects in both private industry and academia After undergrad I took a year off and worked for the company Celgene in their Genomics Group performing microarray experiments As a member of Dr Ashley Chi s lab I

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/chi/lab/kirkpatrick.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    internship with Chris Wylie at the University of Cincinnati While there I explored the role of nucleus pulposus cells in intervertebral disc degeneration Disc degeneration in the vertebral column is a likely cause of lower back pain and as I excitedly made connections between my results and their medical impact I realized that a career in research was perfect for me Prior to coming to Duke I worked in Jon Boyle s parasitology lab at the University of Pittsburgh including one year as a lab tech I did a comparative genomics study between the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii and its closest extant relative Hammondia hammondi studying their structural and functional differences I discovered that the nonpathogenic H hammondi harbors perfectly functional homologs of T gondii s most potent virulence factors indicating that the H hammondi genome will be a valuable tool in analyzing T gondii virulence and host range determinants This project highlights the importance of comparative genomics studies but more importantly it made me realize how much I love genetics I was drawn to the UPGG program at Duke because I have broad interests in genetics and because the program is just the right size there are 12 students

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/chi/lab/walzer.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Argenia received her PhD under the supervision of Dr Peter G Smith at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City KS There she studied the relationship between Langerhans cells an antigen presenting cell and intraepidermal nerve fibers in rodents under non diabetic and diabetic conditions It was this research that propelled her into studying the molecular mechanisms behind neural immune cell communication In 2012 Argenia joined Dr Alejandro

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/lab/doss.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    training at the School of Biochemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences National University of Rosario Argentina where I studied protein lipoylation mechanisms in the Gram positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis In the 2012 I received a PEW postdoctoral fellowship to work at Dr Alejandro Aballay s laboratory where I began my postdoctoral training in the Department of Molecular Genetics Microbiology As a postdoc in the Aballay lab I am studying how genetic variation

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/aballay/lab/martin.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    continued his studies in endocytosis at Washington University In 1999 following an interest in bacterial pathogenesis he developed while studying the intracellular transport of Brucella abortus when he was a graduate student he moved to Boston to join the Ausubel laboratory at Harvard Medical School Dr Aballay moved to Durham in 2002 to join the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology where his studies focus on what makes bacteria pathogenic and hosts resistant In the Ausubel laboratory Dr Aballay developed a novel pathogenesis system utilizing the simple well studied nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the common human bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica Salmonella is well known for its ability to cause food poisoning Nematodes like C elegans eat bacteria and surprisingly C elegans is killed when it is provided S enterica as a food source This killing is accompanied by a persistent infection of S enterica in the C elegans intestine Importantly Dr Aballay has shown that several well studied S enterica virulence factors required for causing disease in mammalian hosts are also required for C elegans killing This validates the use of C elegans as a host to model Salmonella infection in mammals including humans Dr Aballay s laboratory takes advantage

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/aballay/bio.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Research Alejandro Aballay PhD Associate Professor Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology biography alumni publications website Lab members Alejandro Aballay Associate Professor Brian Head Post Doctoral Fellow Argenia Doss Post

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/aballay/lab.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Alejandro Aballay PhD Associate Professor Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology biography lab members publications website Alumni Post doctoral Fellows Samantha Elliott Kerry Ajay Kumar Undergraduate Students April H Spesock

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/aballay/alumni.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    journal pgen 1000657 Abstract Full Article as PDF Styer K L Singh V Macosko E Steele S E Bargmann C I and Aballay A 2008 Innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans is regulated by neurons expressing NPR 1 GPCR Science 17 460 464 Abstract Full Article as PDF Get a Review Haskins K A Russell J F Gaddis N Dressman H K and Aballay A 2008 Unfolded protein response genes regulated by CED 1 are required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity Dev Cell 15 87 97 Abstract Full Article as PDF Get a Review Tenor J L and Aballay A 2008 A conserved Toll like receptor is required for Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity EMBO Reports 9 103 109 Abstract Full Article as PDF Fuhrman L E Shianna K V Aballay A 2008 High throughput isolation and mapping of C elegans mutants susceptible to pathogen infection PLoS One 6 e2882 Abstract Full Article as PDF Styer K L Click E M Hopkins G W Frothingham R and Aballay A 2007 Study of the role of CCR5 in a mouse model of intranasal challenge with Y pestis Microbes and Infection 9 1135 1138 Abstract Full Article as PDF Singh V and Aballay A 2006 A heat shock factor HSF 1 response pathway is important for Caenorhabditis elegans immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103 13092 13097 Abstract Full Article as PDF Singh V and Aballay A 2006 Heat shock and genetic activation of HSF 1 enhance immunity to bacteria Cell Cycle 5 2443 2446 Abstract Full Article as PDF Burton E A Pendergast A M and Aballay A 2006 The Caenorhabditis elegans ABL 1 tyrosine kinase is required for Shigella flexneri pathogenesis Appl Environ Microbiol 72 5043 51 Abstract Full Article as PDF Kerry S TeKippe M Gaddis N C

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/aballay/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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