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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    bring together investigators from Duke University Duke NUS Graduate Medical School and various institutes in the Research Triangle to share their work exchange ideas and identify collaborations in tackling infectious diseases The symposium will cover both basic and applied research relevant to emerging infectious diseases EID It is envisaged that bringing together investigators from two sides of the world will lead to broad ranging discussions on molecular biology pathogenesis evolution and transmission of emerging pathogens leading to development of novel diagnostics therapeutics and vaccines that effectively address this global problem Symposium co organizer Soman Abraham PhD who has research laboratories at Duke and Duke NUS anticipates that the symposium will help to further enhance ties and interactions between Duke and Duke NUS faculty Barton Haynes MD professor of medicine and immunology and director of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and Bryan Cullen PhD professor of molecular genetics and microbiology will give keynote presentations Linfa Wang PhD director of the Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases at Duke NUS will also present Dr Wang runs a BSL4 lab in Geelong Australia where his team is discovering new viruses on a regular basis said Joseph Heitman MD PhD James B Duke Professor and

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/eid_2013.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    is to provide an informal venue for faculty fellows and students in the department to meet and interact benefit from mutual scientific interchange and collaboration and just have fun Durham Bulls baseball season tickets are available on request and opening night is April 4th Don t miss out on this special opportunity to collaborate with your colleagues Printable Schedule Download the 2013 Game Schedule PDF 544KB including every home and

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/bulls.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    no pun intended to lead the Division in the years ahead If you saw John present at the Medicine Research Conference last month you know him to be passionate about his research dedicated to collaborating with other investigators and fully engaged in the training of our residents and fellows Among his many accolades he was selected as the Duke University Scholar Teacher of the Year in 1999 and the Duke Medical Alumni Association s 2010 Distinguished Faculty Award says Klotman Perfect earned his MD from the Medical College of Ohio and after a residency at the University of Michigan he arrived at Duke for a fellowship in infectious diseases He joined the faculty in 1980 and has since become a leading molecular mycologist and expert on cryptococcosis He has published more than 340 peer reviewed articles and he is the recipient of three current NIH R01 awards including one that supports research using C neoformans as a pathogenic model system Under John s leadership the Division of Infectious Diseases has remained one of the top ID divisions in the country with an impressive research portfolio with more than 10 million dollars in awards This is matched by an outstanding training

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/perfect_chief.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Mentoring Awards were created in 2009 to honor the outstanding research mentors in the Schools of Medicine and Nursing Winners of this award demonstrate excellence in numerous aspects of mentoring including accomplishments of individual mentees programs implemented by the mentor or by exceptional creativity in mentoring The award will be presented by Dean Nancy Andrews MD PhD Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Duke University School of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/heitman_11.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Many of our returning fellows are alumni of the Duke sponsored Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Tri Institutional Training Program MMPTP that supports fellows at Duke University the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University in Raleigh We look forward to bringing them together with current fellows and training faculty of the program as well as with outstanding colleagues from other institutions including Aaron Mitchell Jim

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/mycology_symposium_2012.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    learn about genes that allow Chlamydia to flourish in their hosts without the traditional lengthy process of domesticating the pathogen to accept recombinant DNA Valdivia said Our approach marries classical microbiology techniques with 21st century genome sequencing technologies If you encounter a new dangerous microorganism and want to determine what genes are important I think this represents an effective way to learn all we can as fast as we can One of the goals in studying microbial pathogens that harm humans and animals is to locate and disrupt the genes required for infection Valdivia said The microbe in this study Chlamydia is usually sexually transmitted hides in human cells and is a type of bacteria that must cause disease to be transmitted from one host to another Chlamydia is the leading sexually transmitted infection and a risk factor for pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility Prior to this work the function of many Chlamydia genes had to be inferred by their similarity to genes from other bacteria By isolating mutants that don t grow well inside cells and identifying the underlying mutations we can learn a lot about how these genes contribute to disease Valdivia said These are the activities we d like to block For us this significantly accelerates the analysis of Chlamydia and importantly should be applicable to many other microbes that have been difficult manipulate with recombinant DNA approaches he said Valdivia suggested that even microbes associated with our normal intestinal flora which are notoriously difficult to manipulate are now open to exploration so that we can learn how their genes influence human health including dietary disorders and inflammatory bowel disease The work was published on Jan 9 in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Valdivia also said that the new technique

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/valdivia_6.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    were placed on antibiotic treatments after birth which would wipe out some types of bacteria and yeast but once they were off the antibiotics and taking food the researchers expected to see more diversity of bacteria in the babies developing digestive systems than they found The findings were published in PLoS One open access journal on December 8 2011 Five infants had blood infections while three had necrotizing enterocolitis an infection related death of bowel tissue said Seed who is also with the Jean and George Brumley Jr Neonatal Perinatal Research Institute and the Duke Center for Microbial Pathogenesis Seed said that while the study babies were colonized mainly by organisms that were found in stool specimens in some cases they also had infections with Staphylococcus epidermidis a form of staph infection that was abundant in many of the babies digestive tracts The bacteria and yeast in the premature babies digestive tracts are known causes of devastating infections in these babies The gut seems to be a reservoir for some organisms that form infections Seed said Previous to this work we only knew the tip of the iceberg he said The researchers used genomic DNA typing of the bacteria fungi and parasites to determine which types were present It s not clear if the newborns are picking up these early infections from their mother s milk blood or in other ways or if the pathogens are from the environment surrounding the infants It s important to know where these pathogens come from so that doctors can possibly manipulate the babies environment or their digestive systems Seed said He noted that other studies had shown value for giving babies probiotic substances to tip the internal balance toward more favorable bacteria necessary for immunity and better health Seed stressed that certain bacteria

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/seed_1.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    of Sciences Early Edition the week of October 24 through 28 The question was are all SA created equal when binding with fibronectin and the answer is no Fowler said We identified differing SA isolates from the blood of patients All of the patients had SA but some of the cardiac devices were infected and some were not and we wanted to learn why Most people had the infection but a lucky few didn t Working with the lab of Steven K Lower PhD at OSU which specializes in atomic force microscopy the team sequenced the binding regions of the gene that coded for fibronectin binding protein in the bacteria They found that SA with three specific one letter differences in their DNA were significantly more common in the infected cardiac device group The infectious bacteria had one to three of these changes The research team also verified that the ability to bind was stronger in the three SA strains found in the infected group We often hear that nanoscience will make the world a better place and our study demonstrates a direct correlation between something that occurs at the scale of a nanometer i e a bond between a bacterium and implant and the health of human patients with cardiovascular implants said Steven K Lower co corresponding author and associate professor in the OSU School of Earth Sciences Some practical implications of this research could be a new protocol to determine risk of serious biofilm related infections for patients with prostheses or patients who are considering surgical implants For example we could obtain a culture of S aureus from the skin of a patient and determine the risk of a biofilm based infection using the methods we described Roberto D Lins a computer engineer with structural biochemistry and modeling

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/fowler_5.html (2014-06-13)
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