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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Photo Gallery Distinguished Speakers Dr Bernard Moss and Dr Bill Wolfgang Karl Joklik September 24 2010 Previous Next

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/photos/distinguished_speakers/image6.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Photo Gallery Department Retreat September 23 25 2011 Previous Next

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/photos/retreat11/ret15.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    the fungicidal activity of macrophages and to further characterize the effect of nitric oxide on fungal cells From 1991 1995 Dr Alspaugh trained in Internal Medicine at Vanderbilt University He was the Chief Resident in Medicine at the Nashville VA Medical Center from 1994 1995 After this time he returned to Duke University for his subspecialty training in Infectious Diseases He joined the laboratory of Joseph Heitman in 1996 and began to study signaling pathways regulating pathogenesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Dr Alspaugh joined the faculty of the Department of Medicine and Division of Infectious Diseases at Duke University Medical Center in 1998 He also has a secondary appointment in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and he is a member of the University Program in Genetics and Genomics He received the Merck Young Investigator Award in Medical Mycology through the Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2000 He also received a Burroughs Wellcome Fund New Investigator Award in Molecular Pathogenic Mycology in 2001 and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation ASCI in 2011 His research is currently supported by funding from the NIAID to study the Ras and cAMP signaling pathways in microbial development and pathogenesis

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/alspaugh/bio.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    strain causing infection of the bone marrow Medical Mycology 40 1 5 2002 PMID 11860008 Z Yang JA Alspaugh GM Cox JM McCusker Requirement of the C neoformans MET3 gene for growth and pathogenicity Microbiology 148 2617 2675 2002 PMID 12177356 JA Alspaugh and JR Perfect Cryptococcal Meningitis Current Treatment Options in Infectious Diseases 4 75 80 2002 MS Waugh MA Vallim J Heitman JA Alspaugh Ras1 controls pheromone expression and response during mating in C neoformans Fungal Genetics and Biology 38 110 121 2003 PMID 12553941 R Pukkila Worley and JA Alspaugh Cyclic AMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans FEMS Yeast Research 4 361 367 2004 PMID 14734016 MA Vallim L Fernandes and JA Alspaugh The RAM1 gene encoding a protein farnesyltransferase beta subunit homolog is essential in Cryptococcus neoformans Microbiology 150 1925 1935 2004 PMID 15184578 R Pukkila Worley QD Gerrald PR Kraus M J Boily MJ Davis SS Giles GM Cox J Heitman and JA Alspaugh Transcriptional network of multiple capsule and melanin genes governed by the C neoformans cAMP cascade Eukaryotic Cell 4 190 201 2005 PMID 15643074 JA Fraser JC Huang R Pukkila Worley JA Alspaugh TG Mitchell and J Heitman Sex induced chromosomal translocation and segmental duplication in Cryptococcus neoformans Eukaryotic Cell 4 401 406 2005 PMID 15701802 MA Vallim CB Nichols L Fernandes K Cramer and JA Alspaugh A Rac homolog functions downstream of Ras1 to control hyphal differentiation and high temperature growth in the pathogenic fungus C neoformans Eukaryotic Cell 4 1066 1078 2005 PMID 15947199 JA Alspaugh and JR Perfect Fungal meningitis In Roos KL ed Principles of Neurologic Infectious Diseases New York McGraw Hill 2005 BD Alexander ES Dodds Ashley RM Addison JA Alspaugh NJ Chao JR Perfect Non comparative evaluation of the safety of aerosolized amphotericin B lipid complex in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Transplant Infectious Dis 8 13 20 2006 PMID 16623816 K Cramer QD Gerrald CB Nichols MS Price and JA Alspaugh The transcription factor Nrg1 mediates capsule stress response and pathogenesis in Cryptococcus neoformans Eukaryotic Cell 5 1147 1156 2006 PMID 16835458 SS Giles JE Stajich QD Gerrald CB Nichols JA Alspaugh JR Perfect The C neoformans catalase gene family and its role in antioxidant defense Eukaryotic Cell 5 1447 1459 2006 PMID 16963629 GM Olson DS Fox P Wang JA Alspaugh KL Buchanan The role of protein O mannosyltransferase Pmt4 in the morphogenesis and virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans Eukaryotic Cell 5 1447 1459 2006 PMID 17142566 CB Nichols Z Perfect JA Alspaugh A Ras1 Cdc24 signal transduction pathway mediates thermotolerance in the fungal pathogen C neoformans Molecular Microbiology 63 1118 1130 2007 PMID 17233829 JA Alspaugh Immunotherapy in fungal infections J Invasive Fungal Infect 2 4 10 2008 MS Price CB Nichols JA Alspaugh Cryptococcus neoformans Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor mediates intracellular survival and virulence Infection and Immunity 76 5729 5737 2008 PMID 18779335 PMCID PMC2583580 JR Fortwendel PR Juvvadi N Pinchai BZ Perfect JA Alspaugh JR Perfect and WJ Steinbach Differential effects

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/alspaugh/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Res 116 89 96 Higgins Aw Gustashaw KM Willard HF 2005 Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity Chromosome Res 13 745 762 Chadwick LH Willard HF 2005 Genetic and parent of origin influences on X chromosome choise in X ce heterozygous mice Mammalian Genome 16 691 699 Schueler MJ Dunn JM Bird CP Ross MT Viggiano L Rocchi M Willard HF and Green ED 2005 NISC Comparative Sequencing Program Progressive proximal expansion of the primate X chromosome centromere Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 102 10563 10568 Basu J and Willard HF 2005 Artificial and engineered chromosomes non integrating vectors for gene therapy Trends Mol Med 11 251 258 Ross MT Willard HF et al 2005 The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome Nature 434 325 337 Carrel L Willard HF 2005 X inactivation profile reveals extensive variability in X linked gene expression in females Nature 434 400 404 Basu J Stromberg G Willard HF Van Bokkelen G 2005 Rapid creation of BAC based human artificial chromosome vectors by transposition with synthetic alpha satellite arrays Nucleic Acids Res 33 2 587 96 Rudd MK Willard HF 2004 Analysis of the centromeric regions of the human genome assembly Trends Genet 20 11 529 33 Grimes BR Babcock J Rudd MK Chadwick B Willard HF 2004 Assembly and characterization of heterochromatin and euchromatin on human artificial chromosomes Genome Biol 5 11 R89 Chadwick BP Willard HF 2004 Multiple spatially distinct types of facultative heterochromatin on the human inactive X chromosome Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101 50 17450 5 Rudd MK Schueler MG Willard HF 2004 Characterization and functional annotation of human centromeres Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 68 141 149 Rudd MK Mays RW Schwartz S Willard HF 2003 Human artificial chromosomes with alpha satellite based de novo centromeres show increased frequency of nondisjunction and anaphase lag Mol Cell Biol 23 7689 7697 Chadwick BP Willard HF 2003 Chromatin of the Barr Body Histone and non histone proteins associated with or excluded from the inactive X chromosome Hum Mol Genet 12 2167 2178 Percec I Thorvaldsen JL Plenge RM Krapp CJ Nadeau JH Willard HF Bartolomei MS 2003 An ENU mutagenesis screen for epigenetic mutations in the mouse Genetics 164 1481 1494 Hall LL Byron M Sakai K Carrel L Willard HF Lawrence JB 2002 An ectopic human XIST gene can induce chromosome inactivation in postdifferentiation human HT1080 cells Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 99 8677 8692 Chadwick BP Willard HF 2002 Cell cycle dependent localization of macroH2A in chromatin of the inactive X chromosome J Cell Biol 157 1113 1123 Plenge RM Stevenson RA Lubs HA Schwartz CE Willard HF 2002 Skewed X chromosome inactivation is a common feature of x linked mental retardation disorders Am J Hum Genet 71 168 173 Grimes BR Rhoades AA Willard HF 2002 Alpha satellite and vector composition influence rates of human artificial chromosome formation Mol Therapy 5 798 805 Percec I Pleange RM Nadeau JH Bartolomei MS Willard HF

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/willard/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    fellowship in infectious diseases He joined the faculty of the Medical Center in 1995 and received a Burroughs Wellcome Fund New Investigator Award in Molecular Pathogenic Mycology in 1999 His research interests center around fungal infections especially the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis He also enjoys seeing HIV infected persons in the clinic one day per week Dr Cox is well known in the clinic for his playful sense of humor He

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/cox/bio.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    SS Cox GM and Heitman J Adenylyl cyclase associated protein Aca1 regulates virulence and differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans via the cyclic AMP protein kinase A cascade Eukaryot Cell 3 1476 91 2004 Wang P Cox GM and Heitman J A Sch9 protein kinase homologue controlling virulence independently of the cAMP pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans Curr Genet 46 247 55 2004 Kraus PR Boily MJ Giles SS Stajich JE Allen A Cox GM Dietrich FS Perfect JR and Heitman J Identification of Cryptococcus neoformans temperature regulated genes with a genomic DNA microarray Eukaryot Cell 3 1249 60 2004 Pascon RC Ganous TM Kingsbury JM Cox GM and McCusker JH Cryptococcus neoformans methionine synthase expression analysis and requirement for virulence Microbiology 150 3013 23 2004 Kingsbury JM Yang Z Ganous TM Cox GM and McCusker JH Novel chimeric spermidine synhase saccharopine dehydrogenase gene SPE3 LYS9 in the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans Eukaryot Cell 3 752 63 2004 Hull CM Cox GM and Heitman J The alpha specific cell identity factor Sxi1alpha is not required for virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans Infect Immun 72 3643 5 2004 D Souza CA Hagen F Boekhout T Cox GM and Heitman J Investigation of the basis of virulence in serotype A strains of Cryptococcus neoformans from apparently immunocompetent individuals Curr Genet 46 92 102 2004 Kingsbury JM Yang Z Ganous TM Cox GM and McCusker JH Cryptoccocus neoformans Ilv2p confers resistance to sulfometuron methyl and is required for survival at 37 degrees C and in vivo Microbiology 150 1547 58 2004 Olszewski MA Noverr MC Chen GH Toews GB Cox GM Perfect JR and Huffnagle GB Urease expression by Cryptococcus neoformans promotes microvascular sequestration thereby enhancing central nervous system invasion Am J Pathol 164 1761 71 2004 Hicks JK D Souza CA Cox GM and Heitman J

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/cox/pubs.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    to Duke for an Infectious Disease fellowship As an infectious disease fellow he was a member of the team which first identified the bacterial agent causing Whipple s disease Frothingham established the Laboratory of Mycobacterial Pathogenesis at the Durham VA Medical Center in 1994 He was the first to apply DNA sequence analysis to differentiate bacterial strains This work led to the identification of a distinct group of Mycobacterium avium strains associated with disseminated disease in AIDS patients The Frothingham lab developed the first protective DNA vaccine against M avium Frothingham and coworkers described the first systematic typing system for bacteria based on the analysis of multiple loci containing variable numbers of tandem repeats VNTRs They initially applied this approach to M tuberculosis VNTR analysis is now used in laboratories worldwide to type M tuberculosis and other bacteria This method was the basis for the identification of the anthrax strain used in the recent terrorist attacks The Frothingham lab is currently addressing a major hurdle in the development of a successful TB vaccine for adults Adults have pre existing immune responses to environmental mycobacteria which interfere with the immune responses and the protection generated by the current TB vaccine BCG

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/frothingham/bio.htm (2014-06-13)
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