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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    University of Minnesota he joined the Duke faculty in 1974 as an assistant professor of microbiology and immunology He supervised the serology and clinical mycology and mycobacteriology sections of the Duke Hospital Clinical Microbiology Laboratory for many years Dr Mitchell s NIH supported research included the first investigation showing the genetic and phenotypic diversity of pathogenic yeasts such as Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans These studies corroborated observations that strains of these pathogens vary in virulence a finding that has had implications for molecular epidemiology the evolution and emergence of virulent strains and the selection of appropriate strains for research on pathogenicity diagnosis and treatment His research program led to the discovery of the original environmental niche for Cryptococcus neoformans in the mopane trees in sub Saharan Africa and he recently returned from his second major collecting expedition in Botswana Dr Mitchell contributed to medical education for 32 years teaching and directing courses in microbiology medical mycology and lab work For 15 years he directed the Study Program in Microbiology and Infectious Diseases for medical students and from 1975 to 1992 he organized and taught the internationally recognized Duke Summer Mycology Course Since its inception in 2003 Dr Mitchell has

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/mycology/mitchell/ (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    ADMINISTRATION Center T shirts 2002 shirt 2005 shirt The Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis t shirts are available by contacting Rachel Mullis at rachel mullis duke edu

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/shirt.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    and staff in complying with governmental regulations related to maintaining proper visa status Kennett Annette Staff Specialist 613 8636 annette kennett duke edu Annette provides clerical and administrative support for Drs Mariano Garcia Blanco Stacy Horner Dennis Ko Arno Greenleaf So Young Kim and the Center for RNAi Biology She also manages reservations for MGM conference rooms 0010 0040 CARL and 415 Jones as well as coordinating the Thursday seminar series the departmental annual retreat and the MGM holiday party Kibicho Susan Grants and Contracts Administrator 684 3270 susan kibicho duke edu Susan provides post award research administration support for Drs Alejandro Aballay John McCusker Jack Keene Dennis Ko John Rawls Raphael Valdivia and Jorn Coers Kobes Kim Program Coordinator 684 4008 kimberly kobes duke edu Kim serves as the DGSA for the MGM graduate student program She also assists with the Center for Microbial Genomics Microbiomics She also handles the Mycology training grant Krupa Christine Administrative Coordinator 684 3031 christine krupa duke edu Christy provides administrative and clerical support for Drs Bryan Cullen and Micah Luftig She is responsible for pre award and post award grants management for their grants and discretionary funds as well as the Center for Virology Lynch Karen Financial Analyst II 668 3600 karen lynch duke edu Karen manages the MGM departmental funds as well as providing post award research administration support for Drs Mariano Garcia Blanco David Pickup Elwood Linney Hiro Matsunami and the RNAi facility Massard Pat Staff Assistant 684 0436 patricia massard duke edu Pat provides administrative support and is responsible for post award grant management and financial management of discretionary funds for Drs Petes Jinks Robertson Tobin and Silver McCloud Rhonda Grants and Contracts Administrator 613 3263 rhonda mccloud duke edu Rhonda provides pre and post award research administration support for

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/directory/admin.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    A Maisenbacher M Mazzucco S Olivieri C Ploos van Amstel JK Prigoda Lee N Pyeritz RE Reardon W Vandezande K Waldman JD White RI Jr Williams CA Marchuk DA 2010 Overlapping spectra of SMAD4 mutations in juvenile polyposis JP and JP HHT syndrome American Journal of Medical Genetics 152A 333 339 Gallione CJ Richards JA Letteboer TG Rushlow D Prigoda NL Leedom TP Ganguly A Castells A Ploos van Amstel JK Westermann CJ Pyeritz RE Marchuk DA 2006 SMAD4 mutations found in unselected HHT patients Journal of Medical Genetics 43 793 797 Sweet K Willis J Zhou XP Gallione C Sawada T Alhopuro P Khoo SK Patocs A Martin C Bridgeman S Heinz J Pilarski R Lehtonen R Prior TW Frebourg T Teh BT Marchuk DA Aaltonen LA Eng C 2005 Molecular classification of patients with unexplained hamartomatous and hyperplastic polyposis JAMA 294 2465 2473 Svenson IK Kloos MT Jacon A Gallione C Horton AC Pericak Vance MA Ehlers MD Marchuk DA 2005 Subcellular localization of spastin implications for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia Neurogenetics 6 135 141 Lux A Beil C Majety M Barron S Gallione CJ Kuhn HM Berg JN Kioschis P Marchuk DA Hafner M 2005

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/marchuk/lab/gallione.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    autumn rorrer duke edu I recently graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a B A in Biology and a minor in History During my time at UNC I had the good fortune to work in the lab of Dr Glenn Matsushima studying neurodegenerative disorders My undergraduate research project focused on interactions between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells OPC s and microglia and how these interactions affect disease

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/marchuk/lab/rorrer.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Fax 919 684 2790 Email hankyu lee duke edu Recent Interests My research focus is to discover infarction genes that are naturally occurring allelic variations that modulate infarct volume through a collateral independent manner These infarction genes can provide a powerful path toward the development of novel drug targets for ischemic stroke treatment To study my research interest I employ three major experiments that are collateral vessel density measurement infarct

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/marchuk/lab/lee.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    681 9193 Email sena bae duke edu In Dr Valdivia s lab I am interested in establishing time and cost effective genetic tools to perform gene function analysis in non tractable microbial systems such as emerging pathogens and complex microbial

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/valdivia/lab/bae.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    bodies EBs the infectious form of Chlamydia likely employ a large cohort of effectors that are critical for establishing an infection The lack of both a system for genetic manipulation and a cell free culture system suitable for biochemical approaches has hindered the identification of these effector proteins Moreover C trachomatis is of a highly divergent lineage of ancient pathogens and many of its genes have homologs only in other Chlamydia species To overcome these difficulties we used a combination of functional genomics and proteomic approaches to identify potential effectors that are translocated during EB attachment and entry We created a mammalian expression library comprising 130 Chlamydia specific ORFs fused to EGFP and monitored the subcellular localization of these fusion proteins in transiently transfected HeLa cells A distinct subset of these fusion proteins displayed tropism for specific host organelles Because effector proteins secreted during the initial stages of infection are likely pre packaged into the metabolically inert EBs we used two dimensional liquid chromatography of trypsin digested EB proteins followed by quantitative tandem mass spectroscopy to identify the most abundant Chlamydia specific proteins in EBs In addition to TARP a previously characterized effector that nucleates actin we identified over 25

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/valdivia/lab/dunn.html (2014-06-13)
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