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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Dwight Bowman studying the ability of short chain fatty acids to inactivate the eggs of a pig nematode Through this and other classes I became very interested in human pathogens and have since worked in several labs pursuing this Following graduation I worked at the Wadsworth Center as an Emerging Infectious Diseases Fellow studying public health and the pathogens that impact it From there I moved to the lab of Dr James Drake at Albany Medical Center to learn more about human disease from the host side of things I spent a year researching B cell signaling and characterizing MHCII epitopes After that I finally escaped upstate New York and moved out to Boston where I joined the lab of Dr Kami Ahmad at Harvard Medical School studying epigenetic gene regulation and chromatin remodeling The faculty here at Duke are amazing and the breadth and depth of their research is one of the main reasons I chose to come here I am currently enjoying my rotations and the opportunity they give me to experience these different labs and explore different aspects of my research interests When I m not in the lab you can usually find me playing soccer or

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/hughes.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    of bees while testing my latest chemical mixture on an ant colony near their hive When I was thirteen I moved to the United States After transitioning and graduating high school I was fortunate enough to join a laboratory at the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation a premiere plant biology research institute in my hometown Ardmore Oklahoma After a summer of research my decision was solidified I would pursue a career in research I attended the University of Oklahoma OU and majored in Microbiology At OU I was exposed to a wide variety of anaerobic bacterial research I decided to join a lab that focused on molecular systematics While microbe hunting was interesting I was more fascinated by viruses and their uncanny ability to commandeer the cell to execute their selfish instructions So I decided to go the University of Wisconsin Madison to work with Human Cytomegalovirus HCMV After completing my internship I was convinced that viruses were my passion While taking a virology course my senior year I became interested in Human Immunodeficiency Virus HIV so I decided to apply to several schools with strong HIV research I chose Duke University because of their strong program in HIV vaccine research

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/martinez.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    at UF Under Dr Mulligan s direction I spent two years characterizing the genetic diversity of African populations to understand migration patterns in the region as well as developing a novel approach to use high throughput sequencing to selectively sequence the Y chromosome I entered Duke University through the Cell and Molecular Biology program which allowed me to explore different areas of genetic research before joining Dr Beth Sullivan s

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/mcnulty.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    advisement of Dr Graciela Lorca and Dr Claudio Gonzalez This research was focused on the characterization of small molecule interactions that modulate the activity of various transcriptional regulators in Lactobacillus brevis More specifically I investigated the ability of flavonoids to directly interface with key residues of a LysR family transcription factor mediating its ability to induce expression of genes involved in the degradation of plant phenolic compounds My passion for

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/murdoch.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    spent a semester in Brisbane Australia where I joined a lab to study the genetic basis of neural tube closure During a semester I spent in rural East Africa I developed an interest in microbiology after I saw the massive burden infectious diseases has on the population My first rotation in the MGM department was in the Valdivia lab studying the obligate intracellular bacterium Clamydia trachomatis The work I did

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/posfai.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    s laboratory at Washington University There I worked on characterization of the first viruses found to naturally infect C elegans and C briggsae My work in the Wang laboratory produced in me an interest in host pathogen interactions particularly how microbes can evade the host I did my first rotation in the Heitman lab where I performed a screen in order to find epimutants that were conferring resistance to FK506

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/renshaw.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    lab of Dr Jeffrey Lodge studying algal cleanup of waste water and other microbial bio remediation While I did not choose to pursue environmental studies the research sparked my interest in the power of microbes and therefore led me to the program in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke I officially joined the Horner Lab in April of 2014 I am currently most interested in the ways in which microbes

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/roder.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Providence RI There I received a degree in Immunology did an undergraduate thesis project tracking the evolution of HIV drug resistance mutations and experienced my first snowfall My research interest lies in host pathogen interactions I am concerned about the state of infectious diseases in the world today drug resistant strains of bacteria and parasites are rapidly becoming prevalent and no effective vaccines are available for many important viruses such as HIV influenza and dengue virus I believe that the answer to this problem is a robust understanding of both pathogen and the immune system All pathogens have evolved methods to avoid the immune system in order to survive in their host and understanding such virulence factors allow us to develop effective therapeutics that interfere with them to alter the balance in favor of the host I am interested in applying both traditional as well as newer computational techniques to approach these issues At Duke my first rotation was in the Kuehn lab where I studied the impact of P aeruginosa aminopeptidase PaAP an uncharacterized protein abundantly found in P aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles on the virulence of the bacteria in vitro My second rotation is in the Tomaras lab

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/tay.html (2014-06-13)
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