archive-edu.com » EDU » D » DUKE.EDU

Total: 837

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Genome Variation in 2012 His laboratory will continue applying the Hi HOST approach to host pathogen traits for Salmonellae Yersinia and other cellular phenotypes of infection and inflammation The long term goal of the research is to fully understand the human genetic variation for traits important for bacterial pathogenesis and how they impact human disease The Whitehead family established this fund at Duke to recognize and support the best new

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/ko.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    phagocyte receptor CED 1 as a molecular relay between the nervous system and the immune system during an infection in the worm C elegans Joseph Heitman MD PhD chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology remarked It is a strong endorsement by the NIH to receive one of these prestigious fellowships Our congratulations go out to Brian for achieving this mark of distinction as he begins his tenure

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/head.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    announced in the AAAS News Notes section of the November 30 2012 edition of the journal Science Eight fellows associated with Duke University Medical Center are Soman Abraham Professor of Pathology For distinguished and pioneering contributions to the elucidation of mechanisms of bacterial pathogenicity and host immune responses particularly the important role of mast cells Patrick Casey James B Duke Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology For distinguished contributions to the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology particularly to the study of protein modifications and their impact on cellular signaling processes Arno Greenleaf Professor of Biochemistry For distinguished contributions to understanding eukaryotic transcription and RNA polymerase II with special contributions to illuminating CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences Michael Krangel Chair of Immunology For distinguished contributions to the field of immunology particularly for clarifying the mechanisms by which antigen receptor repertoires are created by V D J recombination Kenneth Kreuzer Professor of Biochemistry For outstanding contributions to the understanding of the modes of action of anti topoisomerase drugs and the functional linkages between DNA replication and recombination Hiroaki Matsunami Associate Professor Molecular Genetics and Microbiology For distinguished contributions to the field of chemical senses particularly for characterization of mammalian chemosensory receptors Maria Schumacher Professor of Biochemistry For distinguished contributions in structural biology leading to critical insights into fundamental processes in nucleic acid transactions including DNA packaging segregation and gene expression Raphael Valdivia Associate Professor Molecular Genetics and Microbiology For significant contributions to the development of new technologies and approaches to study the genetic and molecular basis for virulence of pathogenic microbes Six Fellows associated with Trinity College Arts Science Susan Alberts Bass Fellow and Professor of Biology For distinguished contributions to animal behavior particularly long term studies of primate populations in the wild and to conservation biology and evolutionary synthesis Robert

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/aaas_2013.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    basic science research can have tremendous importance for understanding and treating human diseases Petes and his colleagues have discovered striking similarities between yeast and human cells in the structure and function of proteins involved in DNA repair and in the protection of the tips of chromosomes The similarities have yielded new insight into how normal cells become cancerous For example yeast cells lacking particular DNA mismatch repair enzymes exhibit genetic instabilities also found in human colorectal cancer cells a finding that suggested the repair defects might play an important role in the disease process Notably Petes was among the first to apply these findings to hereditary non polyposis colon cancer an inherited syndrome in which 80 percent of patients develop intestinal tumors Petes predicted that afflicted patients might similarly have mismatch repair mutations The Petes lab also identified a gene in yeast required for maintenance of the tips of chromosomes that was closely related to a human gene mutated in patients with the cancer prone disease ataxia telangiectasia Dr Petes rigorous work over the years in a model organism in this case yeast is a wonderful example of how studies of model organisms can inform us about mechanisms of human disease in this case cancer said Michael B Kastan MD PhD executive director of the Duke Cancer Institute and the William W Shingleton Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology He is richly deserving of this award for a superior body of work Petes received his PhD in genetics at the University of Washington in Seattle He then went on to postdoctoral fellowships at the National Institute for Medical Research in London and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge In 2002 Petes served as president of the Genetics Society of America and was the chair of the Department of Molecular

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/petes_4.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    San Francisco where he defined the role of a set of TRPV related ion channels in C elegans behaviors Bargmann describes Tobin as scholarly and deep a star in the making An excellent scientist Tobin is very smart and intensely interested in his own work and related work After graduating Tobin spent two and a half years living in Guatemala where he taught undergraduate classes at the national university He became particularly interested in tuberculosis through an HIV and tuberculosis clinic he became involved with while there and with which he continues to collaborate For his postdoctoral studies Tobin joined Ramakrishnan s laboratory at the University of Washington where he used a zebrafish model of tuberculosis He developed a genetic screen in zebrafish to probe the host genetic determinants of susceptibility to mycobacterial infection Tobin found that the balance between pro and anti inflammatory eicosanoids plays an important role in susceptibility and has applied these findings in human cohorts A functional variant in the human gene LTA4H is associated with disease severity as well as responsiveness to adjunctive therapies for TB meningitis As a postdoc in Ramakrishnan s group Tobin was instrumental in developing a system to perform forward genetic screens in zebrafish to identify factors influencing disease by the tuberculosis bacillus explains nominator Raphael Valdivia Duke University Tobin identified mutations associated with susceptibility to mycobacterial infection in zebrafish and defined the mechanism underlying this susceptibility More impressively he then showed that this information could be used to identify genetic variations in human populations that strongly correlated with susceptibility to tuberculosis and leprosy Valdivia continued These variations predicted outcomes to therapeutic intervention which he was then able to validate in zebrafish His study is one of the most scientifically impressive ones I have seen in the field of infectious diseases

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/tobin_4.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    and Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology These microRNAs enriched in the sickle red cells reduce the parasite s ability to propagate so that certain people stay more protected MicroRNAs are small units of RNA which come from DNA MicroRNAs are only 20 25 nucleotides long and help to regulate gene expression The scientists also showed that when two different microRNAs were introduced at higher levels in normal red cells the parasite growth also was decreased The findings appear in the journal Cell Host and Microbe This finding should lead to greater understanding of the host parasite interaction and parasite lifecycle which may eventually develop into a new approach to therapy for malaria which up to 500 million people develop each year worldwide Chi said Every year about 1 5 to 3 million people die from the disease most of them children according to the World Health Organization WHO Between 1 000 and 2 000 cases occur in the United States I think this work will expand our understanding of the interaction between the malaria parasite and its human host given that this is a completely new mode of interaction between them and will give us a far greater understanding of the parasite life cycle said lead author Greg LaMonte a scientist in the Chi laboratory The malaria parasites grow in the human red cells cells that scientists thought lacked any genetic material Many scientists had looked for the components in sickle cells that could help them resist the parasite but the Duke researchers found one component by thinking outside of scientific norms The Duke team found microRNAs in the red blood cells and showed that their composition is dramatically different in the sickle red blood cells Counter to what they expected they showed that these differences directly contribute to

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/chi_2.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    lab automation and high throughput and high content screening About the Facility The Center for RNA Biology and the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy have established an RNAi Facility for the application of RNA interference RNAi technologies for mammalian functional genomics The primary mission of the RNAi Facility is to develop and deploy RNAi technologies to support functional genomics research programs at Duke Through investments in RNAi and complementary

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/kim.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    their work on innate host responses to Chlamydial pathogens The National Institutes of Health NIH awards individual postdoctoral research training fellowships to promising applicants with the potential to become productive independent investigators in research fields relevant to the missions of participating NIH Institutes and Centers Bastidas and Barker both work in the laboratory of Raphael Valdivia PhD Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and Director of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/news/bastidas_barker.html (2014-06-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •