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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    then went on to study the innate immune system and autoimmunity in the laboratory of Michael Holers at the University of Colorado publishing half a dozen articles about complement and Rheumatoid Arthritis In 2009 Brandt joined the Duke Molecular Genetics and Microbiology PhD program because of its strength in host pathogen interactions In 2010 he joined the Garcia Blanco laboratory where he studies exonucleases that act as pro flaviviral host factors for Dengue and Yellow Fever Virus RNA replication He anticipates a career in public health utilizing the problem solving and critical thinking skills gained through research Manuscripts Initiation of the Alternative Pathway of Murine Complement by Immune Complexes is Dependent on N Glycans in IgG Antibodies Banda NK Takahashi M Wood A Levitt B Rudd P Royle L Abrahams J Stahl G Holers VM Arend WP Arthritis and Rheumatism 58 10 3081 3089 October 2008 Targeted Inhibition of the Complement Alternative Pathway with Complement Receptor 2 and Factor H Attenuates Collagen Antibody Induced Arthritis in Mice Banda NK Levitt B Glogowska MJ Thurman JM Takahashi K Stahl GL Tomlinson S Arend WP and Holers VM J Immunol 183 5928 5937 November 2009 Complement Activation Pathways in Murine Immune Complex

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/levitt.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    My real name is Yuxuan Miao and I come from China After spending four years as a college student in Beijing I went to the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology at Chinese Academy of Sciences to do research My major research interest is how hosts respond to the challenge of pathogens I hope my persistence and passion towards science will help me to make my own contribution to the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/miao.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    684 5230 Email tamika john duke edu Research Interest Microbial pathogenesis I was born and raised in Guyana South America At the age of six I emigrated from Guyana to Maryland I graduated from the University of Maryland Baltimore County UMBC in May 2009 Currently I am a member of the Tomaras lab studying the epigenetic regulation of the CD8 T cell response to HIV When I am not in

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/john.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    enthusiastic mentor and a great professor who had a huge impact on my development as a scientist from him and LC I began to learn how to analyze critically and evaluate the meaning and broader significance of data I learned that I love to think about intricate processes that occur inside cells Coming into undergrad I had originally wanted to study marine biology so I searched for a summer NSF REU between my second and third year to gain experience doing other types of research I did my REU at the College of Marine and Earth Studies at University of Delaware getting preliminary data for a project looking at changes in microbial communities in arctic tundra soils in response to global climate change My work focused on archeal microbe not bacteria or eukaryotes communities and I traveled to a remote field station in Alaska to collect samples With these data I went to the annual American Society of Microbiology meeting the next summer where I realized the broad reach and significance that microbes have I eventually came to understand that I could ask distal evolutionary questions about how organisms adapt behave and evolve and still think about and conceptualize cellular processes by studying how microbes closely interact with host eukaryotic cells Not having actually had any experience studying microbial pathogenesis the umbrella Cell and Molecular Biology program here at Duke University held great appeal to me and I found the program to have the highest academic integrity of all my interviews Since I ve come here I ve found that I really do love microbial pathogenesis cell biology and being a graduate student I ve joined the lab of Rahpael Valdivia where we study how the ancient obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis manipulates host cells through the actions of proteins

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/kokes.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    Ohio by way of Houston TX In 2011 I graduated from Saint Mary s College in Indiana with a B S in Biology and a B A in English Writing During undergrad I also gained summer research experience at the University of Minnesota studying the phenomenon of foreign DNA restriction in vertebrates My fascination with the molecular biology I learned about in college added to an interest in chromosomes that I ve harbored since childhood leading me to Duke s UPGG I love living in North Carolina beyond my studies I enjoy hiking in the state s gorgeous hills and eating delicious barbeque and fried green tomatoes preferably all in the same Saturday In Beth Sullivan s lab I m interested in using human chromosome 17 to study centromere identity and function Chromosome 17 contains two distinct arrays of α satellite the repetitive DNA found at human centromeres although this gives the centromere two potential places to assemble centromeric chromatin is only present on one array per chromosome Their location on that chromosome is inherited across generations and can be thought of as a functional allele or epiallele We can use this centromeric choice on human chromosome 17 as a

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/aldrup.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    9193 Email sena bae duke edu In Dr Valdivia s lab I am interested in establishing time and cost effective genetic tools to perform gene function analysis in non tractable microbial systems such as emerging pathogens and complex microbial communities

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/bae.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    the National Cancer Institute I am currently a rotation student in the Heitman lab Fungal pathogens typically cause disease in immunocompromised patients This includes AIDS and cancer patients as well as anyone undergoing immunosuppressive therapy A notable exception to this general principle is the recent emergence of a new type of the normally opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus gattii which can cause disease in otherwise healthy people This pathogen emerged in the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/billmyre.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    modified by natural selection and undergone significant size expansion during anthropoid evolution particularly along the lineage leading to Homo sapiens The emergence of uniquely human cognitive traits such as abstraction and sociability have been attributed to neocortical expansion Moreover defects in the neocortex either by trauma or developmental aberration can lead to devastating neuropsychiatric disease Project My interests are focused on understanding the gene regulatory mechanisms directing early forebrain development

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/boyd.htm (2014-06-13)
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