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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    UPGG the same year with my love for chromatin non coding sequence host pathogen interaction cheese and turkey I mean diverse foods hiking in summer playing the piano in the gym and swimming at the beach During my undergraduate years I joined Dr Yusheng Cong s lab in our university to investigate functions of microRNAs in cellular senescence For self exploration I turned to C elegans genetics studying engulfment of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/graduate/students/yin.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    these chemicals as biocontrol agents against various mosquito species After graduating in 2008 I worked as a Research Assistant in Dr Thomas Mitchell s Fungal Biology and Parasitism lab at The Ohio State University While there I fell in love with the world of fungi I participated in constructing T vector systems for fungal transformation of the causative agent of rice blast Magnaporthe grisea I also investigated the role of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/cho.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    the University of Rochester just about a year ago I later joined Duke through its Molecular Cancer Biology program and became part of the Jinks Robertson lab a k a the yeast lab Throughout my rotation in this lab I became deeply fascinated by these tiny eukaryotes Simple as they are these budding yeasts allow us to unravel the nature of complex and intricate biological processes such as the event

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/guo.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    in the spring of 2013 That summer she moved to Duke to begin her postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Sue Jinks Robertson Switching gears from mammalian mutagenesis to yeast genetics her goal in the Jinks Robertson lab is to use Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model genetic system to understand basic processes that regulate genomic stability Stephanie is currently a fellow in the Molecular Mycology and Pathogenesis Training Program and is focused on characterizing sequence alterations introduced by the non homologous end joining NHEJ pathway that result from distinct types of DNA strand ends generated at double strand break DSB sites within the genome Publications Nay SL and O Connor TR 2013 Direct repair in mammalian cells Chen C ed New Research Directions in DNA Repair Rijeka Croatia INTECH 123 162 Nay SL Lee DH Bates SE O Connor TR Alkbh2 protects against lethality and mutation in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts DNA Repair Amst 2012 11 502 10 Luo LZ Gopalakrishna Pillai S Nay SL Park SW Bates SE Zeng X Iverson LE O Connor TR DNA repair in human pluripotent stem cells is distinct from that in non pluripotent human cells PLoS One 2012 7 3 e30541 Co authorship

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/nay.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    in INTI International University College in Malaysia but in my sophomore year I transferred my course credits to University of Wisconsin Madison In 2012 I graduated from University of Wisconsin Madison with a BS in Genetics and a certificate in Global Health I received excellent genetics training as an undergraduate researcher at Dr William Engels lab my undergraduate research focused on how aging affects the usage of different double strand

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/hum.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    N C 27710 Phone 919 684 5891 Fax 919 684 6033 Email roketa sloan duke edu I came to Duke University because of the vast majority of research areas Currently my research interests include cell cycle regulation and transcription regulation

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/sloan.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    repair To study this we use the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae Previous work from our lab has shown that transcription dramatically increases the rate of frame shift mutations at tandem repeats My work is translating this discovery to mammalian cells to demonstrate that this mechanism of mutagenesis is conserved This work has enormous implications towards the distribution of mutations throughout the genome because the transcribed and therefore likely coding regions

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/robertson/lab/stringer.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    epee fencer on the UNC Varsity Fencing Team After graduation I worked with Michael Greenberg at Duke and then Jeff Safrit and Mark Feinberg at Emory University studying HIV SIV and the role of the innate immune system in tolerance of SIV in natural hosts After seven years in Atlanta I found my way back to NC working first on fusion inhibitors of HIV at Trimeris and then on novel

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/luftig/lab/barry.html (2014-06-13)
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