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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Abraham Lab Members Ashley St John Graduate Student 257 JONES Building Box 3020 DUMC Durham N C 27710 Phone 919 684 6942 Fax 919 684 5458 Email als30 duke edu Current Position Immunology Graduate Program Areas of Interest Pathogen induced

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/abraham/lab/st.john.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Lab Members Zachary Swann Research Technician 252 JONES Building Box 3020 DUMC Durham N C 27710 Phone 919 684 6942 Fax 919 684 5458 Email zachary swann duke edu Current Position Research Technician Areas of Interest Development of novel therapies

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/bacteriology/abraham/lab/swann.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    medical sciences There I developed an initial interest in immunology and medicine Here at Duke I m a pre med Public Policy major with minors in Chemistry and Global Health I plan to attend medical school post graduation and hopefully work in global maternal health and infectious diseases in the future I am fascinated by the innate immune response to pathogens and have thoroughly enjoyed being a part of the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/lee.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    to research science in the lab of Fr Nicanor Austriaco where we studied the roles of apoptosis and autophagy on aging in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae After completing my undergraduate work I moved back to Massachusetts and took a job at the Ragon Institute of Harvard MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital in the laboratory of Abraham Brass There we used a functional genomics approach to identify viral dependency factors

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/feeley.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    919 684 7109 Email ryan finethy duke edu Research Interest Host defense mechanisms to intracellular pathogens As an undergraduate I studied biochemistry at the University of New Hampshire There I did research in the laboratory of Dr Feixia Chu where we investigated histone modification patterns using a mass spectrometric approach After my undergraduate studies I moved directly into graduate work at Duke University I joined the lab of Dr Jörn

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/finethy.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    transcription elongation in eukaryotes In particular my research focused on understanding the mechanism by which the Paf1 transcription elongation complex promotes histone modifications that are associated with active transcription My time in the Arndt lab was very rewarding and did much to prepare me for graduate study Here at Duke I am interested in returning to my microbiology roots and would like to explore the relationships that exist between microbial

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/piro.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    selective compounds regulate the immune response to Leishmania infections I was able to show that peroxovanadate compounds regulate T cell immunity to Leishmania and that these compounds could potentially be used in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis Additionally I investigated how some strains of Leishmania can resist the antiparasitic effect of Sodium Antimony Gluconate SAG treatments I was able to show that SAG resistant Leishmania strains modify immune signaling events

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/haldar.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
    m fascinated by how microbes invisible to the naked eye engage in highly complex interactions with the human body that can be either beneficial sometimes crucial or harmful I ve been actively engaged in microbiology research since I was 14 and intend to pursue a microbiology related PhD after my undergraduate career Here at the Coers lab I m investigating Interferon induced immune responses to intracellular bacterial pathogens Apart from

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/faculty/coers/lab/yong.html (2014-06-13)
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