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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Duke University Medical Center was selected by the American Society for Microbiology ASM to receive the 2011 ICAAC Young Investigator Award Supported in part by an unrestricted educational grant from Merck U S Human Health Division since 1983 the ICAAC Young Investigator Awards recognize and reward early career scientists for research excellence and potential in microbiology and infectious diseases Coers has demonstrated outstanding creativity in the study of mouse genetics

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/coers_1.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Who Any scientist who has performed significant research in a clinical or scientific field is eligible and must be 45 years old or younger upon presentation of the award Fowler who won the award plus the prize of 5 000 has been a leader in the study of susceptibility to pathogens His research focuses on the question What makes some patients with bacterial disease in their blood do poorly while

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/fowler_4.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    catecholamine receptor similar to vertebrate adrenergic receptors Aballay said OCTR 1 functions in sensory neurons that have the potential to sense pathogens or molecules related to inflammation suggesting that host catecholamines regulate immune responses in response to changes in the surrounding environment In addition the scientists found that the nervous system controls a family of genes that are part of a surprising unfolded protein response UPR pathway that is controlled by a different receptor an apoptotic receptor that has the potential to sense the damage caused by infecting microorganisms Aballay said that this work dovetails with the concept of endurance how a body learns to co exist with a pathogen by igniting not only immune pathways that keep the pathogen in check but also pathways that control the damage induced by the infection In this study exposure to the dangerous bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa up regulates genes to levels comparable to those induced by a well known stressor of the endoplasmic reticulum ER a drug called tunicamycin This study is the first direct demonstration that a bacterial infection can activate a non canonical UPR pathway to alleviate the ER stress that occurs in the cells during innate immune response against bacterial

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/aballay_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    communities focused on fungal microbial pathogens of humans and other animals to illustrate common themes and therapeutic diagnostic and preventive opportunities Among both basic and physician scientists the goal is to bridge those working on the pathogenic microbe via genetics cell biology genomics and the host immunology including both innate and adaptive immunity With respect to therapeutics the emphasis is on developed as well as novel therapeutics including both drugs

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/keystone_1.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    for their outstanding records of scholarly achievement in biomedical research The ASCI represents active physician scientists who are at the bedside at the research bench and at the blackboard Many of its senior members are widely recognized leaders in academic medicine The ASCI is dedicated to the advancement of research that extends our understanding and improves the treatment of human diseases and members are committed to mentoring future generations of

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/alspaugh.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Achilles heel in the battle against C neoformans which frequently causes life threatening illness in people said senior author Joseph Heitman MD PhD chair of the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology This protective silencing effect also operates in some animals and our studies demonstrate that the pathway operates to defend the genome during sexual reproduction Sexual reproduction in fungi produces airborne spores that are readily inhaled into the lungs and thought to be the source of human infections Thus agents that block fungal sex might stop the risk of infection at the source This work was published in the Nov 15 issue of the journal Genes Development C neoformans uses a novel sex induced RNAi RNA interference genome defense system that protects by effectively silencing the DNA so that it is not vulnerable to repeated genes and transposable elements that could cause mutations The silencing system protects the genome from changes that might be imposed by transposable elements of DNA called jumping genes that are also more active during the sexual cycle said Xuying Wang PhD a postdoctoral associate who works in the Heitman lab Through deep sequencing of the small RNAi pieces which mediate the silencing in

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/heitman_8.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    an October 15 luncheon hosted by the Duke Medical Alumni Association Among this year s honorees was John R Perfect MD professor of medicine and interim chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Duke One of the world s

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/perfect_award.html (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    of the Duke University School of Medicine Joe has always demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and his commitment to advancing children s health is being recognized with this prestigious membership St Geme is a nationally recognized expert for his research on the genetic and molecular basis of virulence by Haemophilus influenzae At Duke he oversees clinical activities and research at Duke Children s Hospital Health Center one of the largest health

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/stgeme_3.html (2014-06-13)
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