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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    do more research it was amazing she could be that productive he said Walton has had an interest in science and biology for as long as I can remember said the graduate of Asheville s T C Roberson High School She also had parents who convinced me that I could do whatever I set my mind to she added Her mother is employed by a nonprofit group that works with families battling illnesses and disabilities while her father works in medical computer support So I didn t feel intimidated when I came to Duke because I felt I could make an impact and make a difference she said Hitting the ground running she entered Duke s signature FOCUS program which provides first year students with opportunities to attend interdisciplinary seminars with leading researchers clustered around a common theme I thought for a time I would be a physicist but I really loved the idea of studying life at the molecular level because I think it s just tremendously beautiful she recalled Choosing a FOCUS program in biotechnology she also began talking with professors about doing research in their labs and was surprised by their encouragement Heitman s group which explores the genetic and biochemical factors behind the virulence of Cryptococcus as well as strategies for disabling the fungus particularly captured her interest Joe also had this track record of wanting to have undergraduates working meaningfully in his lab she said of Heitman When I first approached him I just wanted to get my foot in the door she said He told me that I was going to start doing real research right away just headfirst Heitman was right Walton started by learning to culture fungus identify genes and proteins use a bacterium as a syringe to inject genes into microorganisms squint endlessly into a microscope counting and characterizing cells and expect disappointments I ve always been determined and self motivated and that s certainly something that helps as a scientist she acknowledged because there are a lot of setbacks and failures that you have to keep pushing through Walton s efforts have been supported by a series of undergraduate research funding grants including one from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and another from the American Society for Microbiology during academic years as well as summers In the process she has learned the value of having strong mentors Alex is patient and he probably is the best teacher I have had at Duke Walton said of Idnurm I ve learned more through research than in my classes she added and you learn in such a different way Idnurm in turn is sold on the value of having undergrads in the lab I think they re more willing to question established dogma dogma that is probably wrong he said They re not politically wise enough to toe the party line We ll say This is the way it is They ll say Why is that And we often we start thinking Well

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/walton_3.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    a turning point in the field of sensory research providing an avenue for other researchers to join in the pursuit of the remaining nine genes in the mad family said the investigators The results of the Duke research appeared this week in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences to be published in print in the March 21 issue of the journal The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health These organisms can sense all kinds of environmental stimuli light gravity objects said Joseph Heitman M D Ph D senior author of the study Their spore containing branches respond by growing in a different direction or at a different speed in reaction to such stimuli Phycomyces mutants with defective phototropism were isolated in the laboratory of Nobel Laureate Max A Delbrück with the aim of identifying the components of the sensory pathway Biologists named the phototropic mutants mad mutants in honor of Delbrück Of the ten mad mutants identified three madA madB and madC have defective phototropism but react normally to gravity and other environmental signals In 1953 Delbrück quit his research for which he won the Nobel Prize and worked the rest of his life on discovering the photoreceptors or light sensing proteins in the fungus Phycomyces said Duke s Alex Idnurm Ph D first author of the study He never succeeded though was still at it up until he died in 1981 In our paper we identified one of the Phycomyces photoreceptors and show Delbrück s blind strains contain mutations in this gene Using genetic sequence information from the genes for photoreceptors of other fungi the researchers identified two candidate light sensing genes of similar sequence in Phycomyces To determine whether either of these genes was required for light sensing the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/idnurm_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    She works in the laboratory of Joseph Heitman MD PhD A cash award of 1 200 and a commemorative plaque will be made Women s Career Development Grants are given to encourage the careers of women with outstanding accomplishments and potential to carry out research in the area of microbiology The fields covered by the award are any of those represented by Divisions of the American Society for Microbiology The

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/nielsen.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    MS an assistant research professor in the Department of Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health and Director of the Medical Mycology Research Center at the Duke University Medical Center at the Duke University Medical Center was selected by the Medical Mycological Society of the Americas to receive the Billy H Cooper Award for excellence in clinical research laboratory diagnostic procedures and teaching The Billy H Cooper Award is

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/schell.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Center was selected to receive the fifth annual Ruth and A Morris Williams Faculty Research Prize The Williams established this prize to advance research opportunities for younger faculty members 45 years of age or younger and to help publicize the caliber of medical research underway at Duke A panel of distinguished faculty members appointed by Dean R Sanders Williams will present the prize at the Annual Spring Meeting of the

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/fowler.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    the Duke University Medical Center has been invited to participate in the Dean s Summer Fellowship Program in support of undergraduate research and inquiry in the arts and sciences this summer The goals of the Dean s Summer Fellowship Program are to strengthen undergraduate research opportunities for Trinity College undergraduates to enlarge the scope of undergraduate research conducted on and off campus during the summer and to provide support to

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/walton.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    Fellowship URF for the 2005 2006 academic year The ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship URF is aimed at highly competitive students who wish to pursue graduate careers Ph D or M D Ph D in microbiology In this program students will have the opportunity to conduct full time research at their home institutions with an ASM member and present research results at the ASM General Meeting the following year In addition

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/walton_2.htm (2014-06-13)
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  • Duke University Center for Microbial Pathogenesis
    microbes Dr Hull received her B S in Biology from the University of Utah and went on to complete her Ph D at the University of California San Francisco in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology Program in Biological Sciences Dr Hull carried out her Postdoctoral Fellowship at Duke University Medical Center with Dr Joseph Heitman M D Ph D As a graduate student with Dr Alexander Johnson Dr Hull discovered a cryptic mating reaction in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans and identified the molecular factors that control it This work led to identifying the transcription factors essential for the control of sexual development in another human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoforman Dr Hull is currently studying the molecular mechanisms that control infectious particle production in C neoformans Recently she led a consortium effort of 13 laboratories within the Cryptococcus community to develop community resource microarrays for the Cryptococcus genome making this important reagent available to all researchers Dr Hull has received many competitive awards including a Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs Welcome Fund the Basil O Connor Starter Scholar Research Award from the March of Dimes a UW Madison Howard Hughes Medical Institute Career Development Start

    Original URL path: http://mgm.duke.edu/microbial/news/hull.htm (2014-06-13)
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