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  • The demography of natural disasters: What can we learn from DesInventar? | DuPRI
    of natural disasters What can we learn from DesInventar Fall 2014 10 02 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Mark Montgomery PhD Population Researcher Population Council and Professor Stony Brook University Abstract ABSTRACT Although climate related extreme events floods rain induced landslides and droughts are receiving increasing attention in the development and disaster risk reduction communities demographic analysis of the incidence and consequences of these events has remained very scarce

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/demography-natural-disasters-what-can-we-learn-desinventar (2016-02-13)
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  • Big and Small, Early and Late: A FamilBased Study of the Health Effects of Preterm Births and Birthweight | DuPRI
    Big and Small Early and Late A FamilBased Study of the Health Effects of Preterm Births and Birthweight Big and Small Early and Late A FamilBased Study of the Health Effects of Preterm Births and Birthweight Fall 2014 10 09 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Ken Smith PhD Professor University of Utah Abstract ABSTRACT The contribution of preterm birth and birthweight extremes to a child s health risks ranging from infant mortality to later onset diseases in adulthood has been examined extensively The direct causal relationship between gestational age birthweight and later life health has been questioned because they may be measures of confounding factors that are related both to birth characteristics and to later life health With a few exceptions this large body of work does not consider the patterns of birthweight and preterm births within a family Additionally the subsequent parental health impacts of bearing low birth weight or preterm children have not been examined as extensively To further examine the hypotheses that prematurity and birthweight adversely affect children s and parent s risk of short and long term health outcomes and mortality we adopt a family based model where we 1 compare the health outcomes of

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/big-and-small-early-and-late-familbased-study-health-effects-preterm-births-and-birthweight (2016-02-13)
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  • Robin Hood Banking and Diamonds in the Rough': Latino Ethnobanks, Federal Regulation, and Restricted Social and Economic Capital | DuPRI
    Hood Banking and Diamonds in the Rough Latino Ethnobanks Federal Regulation and Restricted Social and Economic Capital Fall 2014 10 16 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Jody Agius Vallejo PhD Assistant Professor University of Southern California Abstract ABSTRACT Scholars question whether Latino especially Mexican American communities contain social financial and ethnic resources that foster mobility and integration This research examines Latino ethnobanks in Los Angeles that are chartered by

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/robin-hood-banking-and-diamonds-rough-latino-ethnobanks-federal-regulation-and-restricted (2016-02-13)
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  • Gender, Sexual Orientation, and Backlash in the Labor Market | DuPRI
    Labor Market Fall 2014 10 23 2014 Location SSRI A103 Speaker Marina Gorsuch PhD Student Duke University Abstract ABSTRACT A broad literature in social psychology has established that respondents react negatively when women engage in traditionally masculine actions in the workplace Heilman and Chen 2005 Heilman Wallen Fuchs and Tamkins 2004 Rudman and Glick 1999 Rudman 1998 Rudman and Glick 2001 Bowles Babcock and Lai 2006 Amanatullah and Morris 2010

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/gender-sexual-orientation-and-backlash-labor-market (2016-02-13)
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  • Impact of a Natural Disaster on Observed Risk Aversion | DuPRI
    103 Speaker Nicholas Ingwersen PhD Student Duke University Abstract Attitudes toward risk play an important role in economic behavior but how these attitudes change following large disruptive events remains unclear This is largely due to persistent problems of selective exposure mortality and migration in these contexts This study explores the impact of exposure to an unanticipated natural disaster the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on attitudes toward risk using exogenous variation

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/impact-natural-disaster-observed-risk-aversion (2016-02-13)
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  • A Moveable Feast: The flexibility of fertility preferences in a transitioning Malawian community | DuPRI
    Seminar Series A Moveable Feast The flexibility of fertility preferences in a transitioning Malawian community A Moveable Feast The flexibility of fertility preferences in a transitioning Malawian community Fall 2014 11 13 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Jenny Trinitapoli PhD Assistant Professor Penn State Abstract ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest a rapid change in fertility preferences among young adults across sub Saharan Africa In this study we shift the focus away from the established questions about fertility declines and stalled transitions to identify and examine an underexplored dimension along which fertility preferences vary within populations flexibility We use the Theory of Conjunctural Action TCA to motivate this exploration of flexibility schemas as a set of meaningful and measurable approaches to fertility Using new data from the Tsogolo la Thanzi TLT study in southern Malawi we examine the sensitivity of young Malawians fertility preferences to a variety of hypothetical but common events that could alter fertility preferences and intentions We argue that flexibility is a dominant but not monolithic phenomenon Flexibility exists along distinct dimensions of fertility preferences quantum and tempo and in different domains of life In Malawi we find that fertility preferences are most responsive to AIDS related conditions

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/moveable-feast-flexibility-fertility-preferences-transitioning-malawian-community (2016-02-13)
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  • Mexican Immigrants and the Early Health and Education of their Children | DuPRI
    Fulltext search Home Training DuPRI Training Events DuPRI Seminar Series Mexican Immigrants and the Early Health and Education of their Children Mexican Immigrants and the Early Health and Education of their Children Fall 2014 11 20 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Robert Crosnoe PhD Professor University of Texas Austin Abstract ABSTRACT Mexican origin families make up the single biggest segment of the immigrant population of the U S As a group they have high levels of socioeconomic disadvantage that combined with other characteristics of the U S receiving context tend to block social mobility across generations The early childhood years are likely to be a critical period in this intergenerational transmission of inequality as well as in policy and programmatic efforts to break it given the significance of this period for long term trajectories of health and human capital development as well as the fact that this is when the oft discussed immigrant paradoxes of positive health and education outcomes are least likely to occur To explore these issues this presentation will discuss the interplay of physical health and educational experiences among young children from Mexican immigrant families specifically the ways in which both serious and common health problems

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/mexican-immigrants-and-early-health-and-education-their-children (2016-02-13)
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  • Probabilistic Population Projections for All Countries | DuPRI
    Opportunities Pivot COS Scholars Duke News Events News Events In the Media Announcements Conferences and Workshops Duke Events Calendar Contact Fulltext search Home Training DuPRI Training Events DuPRI Seminar Series Probabilistic Population Projections for All Countries Probabilistic Population Projections for All Countries Fall 2014 12 04 2014 Location Gross Hall 103 Speaker Adrian Raftery PhD Professor University of Washington Abstract ABSTRACT Projections of countries future populations broken down by age and sex are widely used for planning and research They are mostly done deterministically but there is a widespread need for probabilistic projections I will describe a Bayesian statistical method for probabilistic population projections for all countries These new methods have been used by the United Nations to produce their most recent population projections for all countries The results suggest that world population will increase more than had recently been believed likely reaching between 9 and 13 billion by the end of the century with no end to population growth this century The population of Africa in particular is likely to grow from about 1 billion now to between 3 and 5 billion The number of working age people per retired person will probably decline dramatically in most countries over

    Original URL path: https://dupri.duke.edu/event/probabilistic-population-projections-all-countries (2016-02-13)
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