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  • Env Health & Safety
    Safety Injury and Illness Prevention Ergonomics Bloodborne Pathogens Inspections Safety Tips Near Miss Report Laboratory Safety Bloodborne Pathogens Chemical Hygiene Plan General Lab Health and Safety Waste Disposal Hazardous Waste Bio Hazardous Waste Risk Management University Insurance Information University Vehicles Camp Insurance Special Events Insurance FGCU Other Insurance Programs Hurricane Information Life Safety Insurance Procedures Resources Florida Statutes Administrative Code Weather Links Safety Risk Management Training Contact Information Phone 239

    Original URL path: http://www.fgcu.edu/EHS/near-miss-report.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Env Health & Safety
    Involvement Opportunities Events Academics Research Campus as a Living Laboratory Featured Research Centers Institutes and Programs Living Sustainably Transportation Dining Housing Residence Life Recycling Campus Trails Wildlife Wellness Faculty Staff Sustainability Training Operational Initiatives Sustainability Benchmarks Progress Physical Plant Environmental Initiatives Programs Workplace Safety Injury and Illness Prevention Ergonomics Bloodborne Pathogens Inspections Safety Tips Near Miss Report Laboratory Safety Bloodborne Pathogens Chemical Hygiene Plan General Lab Health and Safety Waste Disposal Hazardous Waste Bio Hazardous Waste Risk Management University Insurance Information University Vehicles Camp Insurance Special Events Insurance FGCU Other Insurance Programs Hurricane Information Life Safety Insurance Procedures Resources Florida Statutes Administrative Code Weather Links Safety Risk Management Training Contact Information Phone 239 590 1414 Fax 239 590 1033 Email ehs fgcu edu Laboratory Safety Chemical Hygiene Chemical Hygiene Plan Chemical Storage Information Glove Selection Laboratory Specific Standard Operation Procedure Complete form and Save As on your computer before emailing to EH S General Laboratory Safety EH S Laboratory Safety Procedures Binder General Laboratory Health and Safety Laboratory Hurricane Checklist Safety Data Sheet Information Bio Safety Bio Safety Manual Bloodborne Pathogens Management and Disposal of Biomedical Waste Research Safety Research Safety Committee Research Safety Application HHS and USDA Select Agents

    Original URL path: http://www.fgcu.edu/EHS/LaboratorySafety.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Env Health & Safety
    a movable sash or fixed partial enclosure on the remaining side constructed and maintained to draw air from the laboratory and to prevent or minimize the escape of air contaminants into the laboratory and allows chemical manipulations to be conducted in the enclosure without the insertion of any portion of the employee s body other than hands and arms Walk in hoods with adjustable sashes meet the above definition provided that the sashes are adjusted during use so that the airflow and the exhaust of air contaminants are not compromised and employees do not work inside the enclosure during the release of airborne hazardous chemicals Laboratory use of hazardous chemicals Handling or use of chemicals meeting all of the following conditions Chemical manipulations are carried out on a laboratory scale Multiple chemical procedures or chemicals are used The procedures involved are not part of a production process nor in any way simulate a production process and Protective laboratory practices and equipment are available and in common use to minimize the potential for employee exposure to hazardous chemicals Particularly hazardous substances include select carcinogens reproductive toxins and substances which have a high degree of acute toxicity Physical hazard A chemical for which there is scientifically valid evidence that it is a combustible liquid a compressed gas explosive flammable an organic peroxide an oxidizer or pyrophoric reactive unstable or water reactive Protective laboratory practices and equipment Those laboratory procedures practices and equipment accepted by laboratory health and safety experts as effective or that the employer can show to be effective in minimizing the potential for employee exposure to hazardous chemicals Based on the definitions above the FGCU Chemical Hygiene Plan will apply to all areas or laboratories engaged in the laboratory use of hazardous chemicals Adm inistrative Details The template for the FGCU Chemical Hygiene Plan is available on the Environmental Health Safety website This location allows the most current information to be available for all FGCU employees It will also provide a template for new investigators or Lab Managers when they bring new laboratories on line and need to complete their own portions of the Chemical Hygiene Plan All laboratories should comply with the FGCU General Laboratory Health and Safety Manual Laboratories using radioactive materials are also required to follow the policies and procedures outlined in the FGCU Radiation Safety Manual it can be found at http www fgcu edu orsp Compliance RadiationManual doc or by contacting the EH S Radiation Safety Officer at 239 590 1414 Laboratories where work involving human primate tissues recombinant DNA select agents or toxins is conducted must also comply with CDC and NIH guidelines Contact EH S for details at 239 590 1414 or find them at http www cdc gov od ohs biosfty bmbl4 bmbl4toc htm Required Components of a Chemical Hygiene Plan The OSHA Lab Standard specifies that eight elements be addressed in order to ensure the protection of laboratory employees These eight elements are summarized below and are fully detailed in 29 CFR 1910 1450 e 3 of the regulation Standard operating procedures for handling toxic chemicals Criteria to determine and implement control measures to reduce employee exposure to hazardous chemicals Requirement that chemical fume hoods and other protective equipment are functioning properly and specific measures that shall be taken to ensure proper and adequate performance of such equipment Employee information and training including emergency procedures Requirements for prior approval of laboratory activities Medical consultation and medical examinations Designation of personnel responsible for implementation of the Chemical Hygiene Plan including the assignment of a Chemical Hygiene Officer Provisions for additional employee protection for work with particularly hazardous substances Responsibilities under the Chemical Hygiene Plan 7 are found earlier in this document and in the General Laboratory Health and Safety Manual Requirements for prior approval of laboratory activities 5 are found in the FGCU General Laboratory Health and Safety Manual and the ORSP webpages The remaining elements will be addressed in the pages that follow Guide for Preparing Laboratory Specific Standard Operation Procedures Replace or supplement this guide with standard operating procedures SOPs for work involving the laboratory use of hazardous chemicals See the definition of Hazardous chemical in the CHP section entitled Definitions An SOP must cover each hazardous chemical used in the laboratory In most cases more than one SOP will be required to describe all of the work in a laboratory There are three methods that can be used to write SOPs They are By process distillation synthesis chromatography etc By individual hazardous chemical arsenic benzene hydrochloric acid etc By hazardous chemical class flammable corrosive oxidizer etc The SOP consists of nine sections and should contain the information listed below Section 1 Is the SOP for a Process Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Class Process Describe the process that involves hazardous chemicals List all chemicals used in the process Hazardous Chemical Name the hazardous chemical for which the SOP is being developed Include IUPAC International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry common name and any abbreviation s used for the chemical Hazard Class Describe the hazard associated with a particular group of similar chemicals and list the chemicals used in the laboratory Section 2 Describe Process Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Class Section 3 Potential Hazards Describe the potential hazards for each process hazardous chemical or hazard class Include physical and health hazards Section 4 Personal Protective Equipment Identify the required level of personal protective equipment and hygiene practices needed for each process hazardous chemical or hazard class Personnel protective equipment may include gloves aprons lab coats safety glasses goggles face shields and respirators Before using respirators all employees must be entered into the University s Respiratory Protection Program Call EH S at 590 1414 for more information Section 5 Engineering Controls Describe engineering controls that will be used to prevent or reduce employee exposure to hazardous chemicals for the process hazardous chemical or hazard class This includes ventilation devices such as fume hoods containment devices such as glove boxes etc Section 6 Special Handling Storage Requirements List storage requirements for the hazardous chemicals involved with the SOP including specific storage areas and policies regarding access to chemicals Special procedures such as dating peroxide formers and testing them before distillation are appropriate here Section 7 Spill and Accident Procedures Indicate how spills or accidental releases will be handled and by whom List the location of appropriate emergency equipment spill kits showers eye washes and fire equipment Any special requirements for personnel exposure should also be identified in this section Identify the location of emergency response phone numbers Section 8 Decontamination Procedures Specify decontamination procedures to be used for equipment glassware and clothing Include decontamination procedures for equipment such as glove boxes hoods lab benches and controlled areas within the laboratory Section 9 Waste Disposal Procedures Indicate how wastes will be disposed Section 10 Material Safety Data Sheet Location Indicate the location of MSDSs for each hazardous chemical used Also indicate the location of other pertinent safety information i e equipment manuals chemical references etc STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE Date Location Principal Investigator Section 1 Process Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Class Section 2 Describe Process Hazardous Chemical or Hazard Class Section 3 Potential Hazards Section 4 Personal Protective Equipment Section 5 Engineering Controls Section 6 Special Handling and Storage Requirements Section 7 Spill and Accident Procedures Section 8 Decontamination Procedures Section 9 Waste Disposal Procedures Section 10 Material Safety Data Sheet Locations Con t ro l Measures to Reduce Employee Exposures Safe work with hazardous chemicals can only be accomplished through the use of proper control measures Proper control measures include the use of engineering controls personal protective equipment proper storage and handling of chemicals and proper use and maintenance of safety equipment Use of proper control measures reduces the risk of employee exposure to hazardous chemicals It is prudent to minimize all chemical exposures Because few laboratory chemicals are without hazards general precautions for handling all laboratory chemicals should be adopted rather than specific guidelines for particular chemicals Skin contact with chemicals should be avoided as a cardinal rule It is important to avoid underestimation of risk Even for substances of no known significant hazard the exposure should be minimized for work with substances which present special hazards special precautions should be taken One should assume that any mixture will be more toxic than its most toxic component and that all substances of unknown toxicity are toxic Engineering Controls Ventilation is a common and important form of engineering control used to reduce exposures to hazardous chemicals There are two types of ventilation general ventilation and local exhaust General Ventilation General ventilation for lab operations should be that the laboratory is under a slightly negative pressure relative to other rooms This helps prevent chemical contamination as well as odors from leaving the lab Lab ventilation should be 6 to 8 room air changes per hour verified by professional engineering analysis at the time of installation Note that this rate will not necessarily prevent the accumulation of chemical vapors in dead spots or eddies which should be minimized during design of the laboratory Local Exhaust Local exhaust ventilation like that provided by a chemical fume hood is the recommended method for reducing employee exposures to hazardous dusts fumes and vapors In addition to providing protection against chemical exposures with the hood sash closed or lowered to an appropriate working level the hood can provide some protection from chemical splashes and fires The maximum working level of the hood sash is identified by the EH S sticker that contains the maximum working height hood face velocity date of inspection and the inspectors initials Chemical fume hood operation is checked annually by EH S See FUME HOOD PERFORMANCE below for more information Other Ventilation Other means of ventilation include the use of biological safety cabinets evacuated glove boxes and isolation rooms These are very specialized pieces of equipment and must be certified annually by individuals with proper training and credentials to perform the inspection i e the manufacturer or the distributor The exhaust from these types of equipment may require passage through special filters or scrubbers before being exhausted to the atmosphere or recirculated to the area Personal Protective Equipment Standard laboratory attire must be worn when working with hazardous chemicals Standard laboratory attire includes lab coat long pants safety glasses goggles gloves and closed toe shoes Additional protective equipment such as face shields blast shields or respirators may be appropriate in some cases Respirators may only be worn when engineering controls cannot keep exposure to chemicals below permissible exposure levels PELs set by OSHA see additional reference information of this CHP Employees may not wear a respirator until they have been cleared by a physician attended FGCU Respiratory Protection Training and been fit tested for the respirator they will be using Proper Storage and Handling of Chemicals Proper storage of chemicals is important to prevent chemical reactions that may result in fires explosions or other safety health hazards Chemicals must not be stored in simple alphabetical order Storage in this manner is unsafe as no regard for chemical incompatibility is considered Chemicals must be stored according to chemical compatibility that is store chemicals of similar hazards and reactive potential together Suggested chemical storage patterns and lists of chemical incompatibilities are included in Attachment 2 of this plan Additionally many chemical companies provide storage codes for their products in order to provide for safe storage Flammable Chemical Storage When the volume of flammable liquids stored in a laboratory exceeds 10 gallons of flammable or combustible liquids those liquids must be stored in an approved flammable storage cabinet Volumes below 10 gallons should be stored based on other compatibility considerations No more than 60 gallons of flammable liquids nor more than 120 gallons of combustible liquids may be stored in a flammable storage cabinet If flammable chemicals are to be stored in a refrigerator the refrigerator must be approved for flammable storage i e no lights switches thermostats inside and marked labeled appropriately Corrosive Liquid Storage Corrosive liquid storage should be designed based on the compatibility of both construction materials and other chemicals Containers should be unbreakable or double contained packaging Cabinets should be designed to hold the contents in case of container breakage Toxic Chemical Storage Toxic chemicals should be stored in accordance with general chemical compatibility guidelines In the case of some poisons they should be stored in a dedicated locked cabinet Storage of Chemicals in Refrigerators All refrigerators located in laboratory areas must be clearly marked as to their contents An inventory list should be posted on the outside of the refrigerator Refrigerators used for chemical storage must be marked Caution Do Not Store Food or Beverages in This Refrigerator Refrigerators located in break rooms or lunchrooms and which are located in the vicinity of laboratories should be marked Food Storage Only No Chemicals Safety Equipment At a minimum the following safety items must be readily available in the laboratory Fire Extinguisher Eyewash Safety Shower Spill Kits Absorbents First Aid Kit Telephone with emergency numbers posted Fire Extinguishers are inspected by EH S personnel Laboratory personnel should check all safety equipment at least once a month to verify operation and accessibility Report any problems with laboratory safety equipment to EH S at 590 1414 Restrict laboratory operations until safety equipment is repaired no chemical work is to be performed in a malfunctioning fume hood Spill Kits and First Aid Kits are to be maintained by individual laboratories or departments Spill Kits must be available for the specific hazards of the chemicals in use in the laboratory For example clay absorbent or activated carbon for flammable solvents bicarbonate of soda for acids and citric acid for bases Amorphous silica spill absorbents may be used for all types of spills except hydrofluoric acid spills Neutralize hydrofluoric acid with sodium bicarbonate or absorb it with clay absorbent Solid materials may be placed directly into the appropriate container based on volume of spill and chemical nature All materials collected during spill cleanup must be placed in an appropriate container and properly labeled If the material is identified as waste it must be disposed of properly by calling EH S Fume Hood Performance Yearly Certifications EH S verifies chemical fume hood performance annually Each properly functioning hood will be marked with maximum sash height that provides adequate face velocity across the hood opening Biological Safety Cabinets and other specialty ventilation devices must be certified by appropriately trained and competent external vendors Consult EH S for more information Inspections by Users Users should verify hood operation each time they use the hood Users must ensure that fume hoods are working before each use by using either the low airflow alarm or a magnehelic gauge as supplied to detect hood malfunctions Do not use a hood if the inspection label is missing or out of date more than 1 year since last inspection If there are problems with the operation of any hood EH S should be notified Typical hoods are not designed to withstand explosions When using a fume hood always keep your work at least 6 inches inside the hood face This simple step can reduce vapor concentrations at the face of the hood by as much as 90 percent Contingency Plan for Hood Failures For a variety of reasons fume hoods may malfunction To avoid interruptions in laboratory use users must have a contingency plan for hood failure If a fume hood malfunctions close the sash and report it to EH S If a hazardous condition exists in a malfunctioning fume hood it must be contained and removed before the hood will be repaired Place a warning sign on the hood to prevent others from opening or using the hood until it is repaired and EH S has verified the unit is working properly Emp loyee Information and Training An essential component of the FGCU Chemical Hygiene Plan is providing information and training to all laboratory workers This information and training will ensure that laboratory workers are aware of the hazards posed by chemicals in their work areas and how to protect themselves from these hazards Training will occur at the time of initial assignment and prior to work involving new exposure situations Refresher training will occur annually or as necessary based on observation by the laboratory PI Laboratory worker training will include the contents and appendices of the FGCU CHP mandatory and recommended exposure limits for hazardous chemicals the signs and symptoms associated with exposures to hazardous chemicals A ctivities Requiring Prior Approval In order to protect the health and safety of laboratory employees building occupants and the community at large certain laboratory activities require prior approval before they may begin or the materials procured See the General Laboratory Health and Safety Manual for details Medical Consultation Examinations When an employee develops signs or symptoms associated with a hazardous chemical to which the employee may have been exposed to the employee shall be provided an opportunity to receive an appropriate medical examination When exposure monitoring reveals an exposure level routinely above the action level or in the absence of an action level the PEL for an OSHA regulated substance for which there are exposure monitoring and medical surveillance requirements medical surveillance shall be established for the affected employee Whenever an event takes place in the work area such as a spill leak explosion or other occurrence resulting in the likelihood of a hazardous exposure the affected employee shall be provided an opportunity for a medical consultation Such consultation shall be for the purpose of determining the need for a medical examination Notify FGCU EH S of all cases of possible overexposure to hazardous chemicals EH S will then conduct an exposure assessment and collect all relevant information regarding the situation All incidents of overexposure must be fully documented See Attachment 6 Accident Reporting All consultations examinations will be conducted or supervised by a licensed physician These consultations and

    Original URL path: http://www.fgcu.edu/EHS/ChemicalHygiene.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Env Health & Safety
    of a naturally occurring hazardous material Animal Carcasses Any dead vertebrate animal including birds or animal part Packaging Waste General Laboratory Waste and Non infectious Biological Waste Place materials into a container for disposal as solid waste Any broken glassware or pipettes should be placed in rigid cardboard labeled Broken Glassware boxes Needles razor blades scalpels and other clean but sharp items must be packaged in rigid plastic labeled Sharps Containers Biohazardous Waste Deactivate infectious wastes or place them into the biohazardous waste storage containers for disposal within 24 hours of their generation Label the waste storage container with the date the first waste is placed into the container Packaged wastes may not be stored longer than 30 days Waste containers may not be stored in classrooms hallways or other readily accessible public areas Mixed Radioactive Biological Waste Inactivate the biological component of mixed radioactive biological waste using steam sterilization or chemical inactivation as appropriate prior to its release to Radiation Safety for disposal as radioactive waste If it will not be possible to safely inactivate the biohazardous component of the waste contact the Radiation Safety Officer for guidance prior to generating the waste Mixed Chemical Biological Waste Inactivate the biological component of mixed chemical biohazardous waste prior to its release for chemical disposal Take the appropriate precautions to prevent the generation and release of toxic chemicals during the inactivation process Do not autoclave flammable or reactive compounds due to the explosion hazard If it will not be possible to safely inactivate the biohazardous component of the waste contact EH S for guidance prior to generating the waste Animal Carcasses Dispose of all animals vertebrates and parts as biohazardous waste do not dispose of animal carcasses as solid waste Carcasses must be double bagged one sealed plastic bag placed inside another sealed plastic bag Tape the animal s teeth or claws if they present the possibility of puncturing the bag Biohazard Bags Maintain written documentation that red bio hazard bags used meet the following requirements of the Florida Administrative Code 64E 16 An impact resistance of 165 grams and tearing resistance of 480 grams in both the parallel and perpendicular planes with respect to the length of the bag Determine impact resistance using ASTM D 1709 91 and tearing resistance using ASTM D 1922 89 The total concentrations of lead mercury hexavalent chromium and cadmium must be no greater than 100 ppm for the dyes used in coloring the bags Sharps Containers Dispose of sharps at the point of origin into single use or reusable sharps containers Seal the sharps container when full All outer containers must be rigid leak resistant and puncture resistant Reusable outer containers must be smooth easily cleanable materials and decontaminated after each use Labeling Use containers with the preprinted universal biohazard symbol and the words biomedical biohazardous or infectious Transport Biohazardous waste transported outside the laboratory but remaining on campus i e to an autoclave or incinerator must be in a closed leak proof container labeled biohazard Only personnel trained in the handling of biohazardous materials including isolation and clean up of spills may transport these wastes Back to the top CHEMICAL HAZARDOUS WASTE See the full Hazardous Waste policy at the EH S website It is the PI or ALL s responsibility to ensure proper management and storage of all hazardous wastes generated by their laboratory Labeling Label hazardous wastes at the point of generation Remember that a material does not become a waste until it no longer has an intended use Using permanent ink write legibly on the label The phrase Hazardous Waste The chemical name s of the constituents Avoid using chemical formulas The percents of chemicals Percents must sum to 100 The date waste is first added to the container The name s of the responsible PI ALL or designated person Storage Do not dispose of hazardous wastes down drains in the trash or by evaporation Hold all hazardous waste in the generating location or other defined satellite accumulation area for the next scheduled pick up and disposal Contact EH S to discuss options if storage presents a problem Collect hazardous wastes in capped containers compatible with the waste Milk jugs are not acceptable Use an appropriately sized container for the waste generated under filled containers cost the same for disposal as a filled one Do not overfill containers leave a minimum 1 of headspace Do not mix mercury or other metals halogens radioactive materials or biohazardous materials with wastes Records Maintain all records related to hazardous waste generation disposal and training for a minimum of 3 years Currently all disposal records are maintained by EH S Waste Minimization Federal and State regulations mandate waste minimization by hazardous waste generators Pollution prevention P2 reduces or eliminates waste created at the source avoiding the generation of a waste The use of alternative materials can provide equivalent results while preventing worker health risks P2 protects the environment by reducing the risk of toxic releases and saves money by avoiding waste handing disposal and treatment costs Take reasonable and appropriate actions to minimize the amount of hazardous waste generated by your teaching or research activities Examples of these actions may include Use of surfactant cleaning compounds instead of chromic acid Use non formaldehyde based fixatives in place of formalin and formaldehyde free preserved specimens Use non hazardous scintillation fluids in place of toluene or xylene Balance the economy of purchasing larger quantities with the need for storage space and the significant costs for disposal Reuse and recycling of hazardous materials for subsequent activities For assistance or questions please contact EH S or the Florida DEP RETAP program http www dep state fl us pollutionprevention retap htm Training PI s and ALL s must ensure all their students and staff handling or performing activities that may generate a hazardous waste receive proper training within six months of assignment Until trained direct supervision is required This training must include An overview of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act RCRA regulations Identifying and labeling wastes Accumulation limits Waste minimization Containers and segregation of wastes Special wastes P K and U Waste pick up and disposal Spill clean up Back to the top RADIOACTIVE WASTES See the Radiation Safety Manual for information Back to the top HAZARD AND EXPOSURE CONTROL Engineering Controls General Ventilation Properly managed room ventilation can dilute and help to control the spread of hazardous and noxious agents within and from the laboratory Where hazardous or noxious agents are used the ventilation supply air must be single pass at a rate sufficient to exchange the occupied space volume a minimum of 6 and no more than 10 times per hour Run exhaust hoods in the laboratory during the use of hazardous or noxious agents to provide proper room ventilation Ensure supply air vents are free of obstructions to allow adequate airflow and mixing through the laboratory Keep laboratory and autoclave doors closed as hazardous and noxious agent containment is partially dependent on proper airflow balance between laboratory and other adjacent spaces In the event of failure of the laboratory ventilation system Immediately stop working with and contain hazardous or noxious agents Leave the laboratory Notify EH S 590 1414 and the Physical Plant Department Work Management Center 590 1370 Biological Safety Cabinets Biological safety cabinets are ventilated boxes that give users a degree of protection against hazardous particles and aerosols generated within the cabinet There are different levels of protection afforded by biological safety cabinets depending on the design Install maintain and use biological safety cabinets in accordance with the CDC document Primary Containment for Biohazards Selection Installation and Use of Biological Safety Cabinets Alert Purifier Vertical Clean Benches and Filtered PCR Enclosures do not provide user protection Biohazardous materials toxins and radionuclides should be handled in Class I or Class II biological safety cabinets Fume Hoods Use fume hoods to control exposures when handling hazardous or noxious materials If the hood airflow monitor goes into alarm stop and secure the work shut down the hood and arrange for repair Conduct all work with a potential for airborne exposure to a carcinogen or reproductive hazard in a chemical fume hood Conduct any work involving a toxic compound with a potential inhalation exposure within a fume hood Conduct potentially explosive work within a fume hood with additional shielding Operate fumes hoods with the sash closed except when necessary to manipulate or set up the experiment The sash should not be opened more than 18 inches in height unless necessary to move a piece of equipment in or out of the hood Locate water air vacuum gas and electrical controls outside of the hood Do not store materials in fume hoods as the unnecessary clutter interferes with airflow through the hood and increases the opportunities for spills or explosive reactions Certain hoods designated as hazardous waste satellite storage sites are exceptions to this Use small tissues such as KimWipes with care inside of fume hoods as they can enter the exhaust stream and clog the vanes and motors Check to ensure hoods are operating and have a current certification before each use Specialized ventilation systems such as small HEPA filtered enclosures snorkel trunks and canopy hoods may be required in certain instances to control fine powders or processes which release heat or vapors and do not fit within a conventional chemical fume hood or biological safety cabinet Personal Protective Equipment PPE Laboratory Clothing Employees and students must wear shoes and clothing appropriate for the agents and equipment in the laboratory Use impermeable aprons over regular laboratory clothing when handling hot liquids very cold substances such as liquid nitrogen or hazardous chemicals such as corrosives Do not wear protective coats aprons or gloves outside of laboratory areas Launder and dispose of lab coats in a manner appropriate for the potential hazard Do not take contaminated laboratory coats or other protective clothing home to launder Gloves Gloves can provide protection against specific chemical agents extreme temperatures and traumatic injury Proper glove material and construction is important consider permeation rates contact time and dexterity when making a selection Gloves used to handle chemical and biological hazards are potentially contaminated Remove these gloves before opening refrigerators incubators room doors or answering the telephone Hand washing is required after removal of gloves Discard gloves into appropriate waste containers after handling chemical or biological hazards Eye and Face Protection Employees and students must use eye protection that conforms to American National Standards Institute Z87 1 1994 when exposed to eye or face hazards from flying particles molten metal liquid chemicals acids or caustic liquids chemical gases or vapors or potentially injurious light radiation Employees and students who wear prescription lenses while engaged in operations that involve eye hazards shall wear eye protection that incorporates the prescription in its design or wear eye protection goggles face shield or over the glasses protection that fit over the prescription lenses without disturbing the proper position of the prescription or the protective lenses Contact lenses are not recommended as they may increase the wearer s risk when exposed to a hazardous agent Persons exposed to hazardous chemicals must not wear contact lenses unless wearing goggles to provide full protection Respiratory Protection Wear respiratory protection in situations where engineering and other controls cannot feasibly contain a respiratory hazard Implementing the use of respiratory protection requires compliance with the FGCU Respiratory Protection Program EH S must approve in writing all required respirator selection and use and will assist with properly training and fit testing respirator wearers for each specific respirator Hygiene Pipetting by mouth is prohibited Eating drinking chewing gum smoking and the application of makeup are prohibited in laboratories All laboratories must have provisions for hand washing with soap and water Back to the top REMOVAL OR SERVICING OF LABORATORY EQUIPMENT The PI or ALL must certify that laboratory equipment is free of contamination from dangerous chemicals or infectious organisms prior to removal from a laboratory or on site servicing Inform service personnel of hazards in the laboratory and any necessary precautions required while working in the laboratory To minimize potential exposure do not handle hazardous agents while service personnel are in the laboratory Back to the top SAFE WORK PRACTICES Chemical Hygiene Plan Every PI shall prepare and implement a chemical hygiene plan in accordance with OSHA 29 CFR 1910 1450 for his or her particular laboratory operations A copy of this plan must be available in the laboratory at all times Compressed Gasses Use and store compressed gas cylinders in accordance with the National Fire Protection Association code and in accordance with the Compressed Gas Association Inc Handbook for Handling Compressed Gases http www cganet com Cylinder size for toxic or flammable gasses is limited to 200 cubic feet Only open the main valve cylinder as far as necessary to produce the required gas flow and when practical close valves on gas cylinders before leaving the laboratory at the end of the workday Leak test cylinders with a soap solution both before and after attachment of the regulator Return leaking cylinders to the vendor Take leaking cylinders of nontoxic nonflammable gas to a loading dock or other place having suitable airflow Leaks from cylinders of toxic or flammable gases require immediate attention Evacuate the area of a leaking cylinder and contact EH S for assistance Wear appropriate respiratory protection and protective clothing if attempting to move leaking cylinders of toxic gas Turn off any open flames if the gas is flammable Identify the contents of cylinders with decals stencils glued or wired on tags or other markings on the cylinders Color codes alone or tags hung around the necks of the cylinders are not acceptable Do not accept cylinders from the vendor without proper content identification or without valve safety cover in place and properly tightened Staff and vendors moving cylinders on the FGCU campus must use hand trucks carts or dollies Do not drag or roll cylinders for distances greater than 3 feet Do not move compressed gas cylinders if the protective valve cover is not securely in place Secure cylinders to walls benches or stable pieces of equipment or attach non tip bases before removing the valve safety covers from the cylinders Cylinders may be secured with chain or canvas straps around the top of the cylinder Full and empty cylinders must be clearly marked and stored separately if possible Do not store cylinders containing flammable gases adjacent to oxidizers Do not use cylinders without proper tags or labels Label cylinder contents unknown and return to the supplier Purchase and use of highly toxic gases requires the prior written clearance of EH S Request clearance well in advance of the proposed use as some gases may require facilities and equipment not immediately available Design pressurized piping for toxic gasses as a double walled system with the outer wall connected to an exhaust system to scavenge and remove any leaks from the primary piping Empty cylinders of toxic gases must be returned to the vendor or disposed of with the assistance of EH S Cryogenic Liquids The potential hazards that accompany cryogenic liquids may result from the extreme cold which can freeze human tissue on contact and can cause carbon steel plastics and rubber to become brittle Extreme pressure resulting from rapid vaporization of the refrigerated liquid due to leakage of heat into the cryogenic container or system is another hazard Finally asphyxiation due to displacement of air by escaping liquid and the resultant rapidly expanding gas is another potential hazard All staff and students handling cryogenic liquids must be properly trained in the use of specialized equipment designed for the storage transfer and handling of these products Wear gauntlet style cryogenic gloves with elastic at the openings safety shoes aprons and face protection must be worn to prevent possible contact with the extremely cold surfaces of uninsulated piping transfer connections valves and other equipment or from the cold liquid or boil off vapors which may result from spilled or splashed liquid Conduct transfer operations involving open containers such as Dewars slowly to minimize boiling and splashing of the cryogenic liquid Conduct these operations only in well ventilated areas to prevent the possible accumulation of inert gas which can replace the oxygen in the atmosphere and cause asphyxiation Ergonomics Tasks requiring awkward positions high force vibration cold and or high repetition can result in injuries Many tasks performed in laboratories such as using pipettes microscopes microtome and centrifuges can result in these strain or repetitive use injuries Always try to work at a bench cutout If standing for long periods use supportive shoes and cushioned mats Consider the use of mechanical pipettes or other alternatives where appropriate Using a pipette can involve several ergonomic stressors thumb force repetitive motions and awkward postures When using a microscope adjust your chair workbench or microscope as needed to maintain an upright head position Elevate tilt or move the microscope close to the edge of the counter to avoid bending your neck Use adjustable eye pieces or mount your microscope on a 30 angle stand for easier viewing and keep scopes repaired and clean Spread microscope work throughout the day and between people if possible Take breaks from microscope work every 15 20 minutes to close your eyes or focus on something in the distance Every 40 60 minutes get up to stretch and move Glassware Inspect all glassware before use Do not use broken chipped starred or badly scratched glassware Most laboratory glass such as Pyrex is manufactured from borosilicate glass and are not suitable for recycling Normal glass such as that often found in reagent containers can be recycled after proper rinsing Discard damaged or broken laboratory glassware in containers specifically designated for broken glass NOT in regular trash NEVER handle broken glass with your hands use brooms and dust pans All broken glass requires special handling and disposal procedures to prevent injury not only to lab

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  • Env Health & Safety
    Events Academics Research Campus as a Living Laboratory Featured Research Centers Institutes and Programs Living Sustainably Transportation Dining Housing Residence Life Recycling Campus Trails Wildlife Wellness Faculty Staff Sustainability Training Operational Initiatives Sustainability Benchmarks Progress Physical Plant Environmental Initiatives Programs Workplace Safety Injury and Illness Prevention Ergonomics Bloodborne Pathogens Inspections Safety Tips Near Miss Report Laboratory Safety Bloodborne Pathogens Chemical Hygiene Plan General Lab Health and Safety Waste Disposal Hazardous Waste Bio Hazardous Waste Risk Management University Insurance Information University Vehicles Camp Insurance Special Events Insurance FGCU Other Insurance Programs Hurricane Information Life Safety Insurance Procedures Resources Florida Statutes Administrative Code Weather Links Safety Risk Management Training Contact Information Phone 239 590 1414 Fax 239 590 1033 Email ehs fgcu edu Waste Disposal FGCU Hazardous Waste Minimization and Management Plan Hazardous Wastes Management and Disposal of Hazardous Waste Schedule a Materials Haz Waste Pick Up Complete form Save As to computer and attach to an e mail to ehs fgcu edu No waste drop offs will be accepted Bio hazardous Management and Disposal of Biohazardous Waste Lee County Solid Waste Sharps Program Contractor Issues Hazardous Waste Controls for Construction Renovation and Demolition Projects pdf Recycling Recycling at FGCU Florida DEP

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  • Env Health & Safety
    soaked rags Corrosive Characteristic Waste Any type of waste which has a pH of less than 2 acidic or greater than 12 5 basic or corrodes steel at a rate specified by EPA Corrosive wastes may include sulfuric acid hydrochloric acid muriatic acid sodium hydroxide HTH chlorine lye lime battery acid drain openers Drano and other products that contain strong acids or bases which include many cleaning products Reactive Characteristic Waste Any waste which is unstable can readily undergo a violent change reacts violently with water is capable of detonation or explosive reaction or contains sulfides or cyanides that have the potential for generating toxic fumes or vapors Examples of reactive wastes include sodium and potassium metal dry picric acid compounds that form explosive peroxides cyanide plating operations and anything pressurized i e propane tanks aerosol cans flares fireworks ammunition etc Toxic Characteristic Waste or TCLP Any waste identified through an EPA method T oxic C haracteristic L eachate P rocedure that has the potential of forming a leachate that may cause groundwater contamination If any product contains a constituent greater than a specified concentration as determined by the TCLP it is a hazardous waste Examples are products that contain benzene many petroleum based products cadmium nickel cadmium batteries lead lead batteries and lead paints silver spent photofixer silver nitrate chromium mercury mercury batteries fluorescent light tubes rat poison weed killers and antifreeze etc Mixtures A mixture of a listed waste and any other waste will remain regulated as a listed waste regardless of the percentage of the listed waste in the mixture A mixture of a characteristic hazardous waste and any other waste will only be considered hazardous if the resultant mixture exhibits a hazardous waste characteristic Even if resultant mixtures do not exhibit a characteristic of hazardous waste they may still require further treatment before proper disposal Derived From By Product Wastes A result of treatment storage or even proper disposal residues of hazardous waste can be generated from the original hazardous waste The hazardous status of residue such as a sludge ash or filter depends on the type of hazardous waste from which it is derived Just as with mixtures of hazardous waste if a residue is derived from a listed hazardous waste or exhibits a characteristic of hazardous waste then it is regulated under RCRA as a hazardous waste Contaminated Media and Debris Environmental media i e soil or ground water contaminated by a listed hazardous waste must be managed as that listed waste regardless of the concentration of waste they contain Media and debris contaminated with a characteristic hazardous waste must be managed as a characteristic hazardous waste only if they exhibit a hazardous waste characteristic Storage Area This is a regulated area in which all containers must be labeled dated and inspected weekly in which hazardous wastes are temporarily stored while awaiting transport to a licensed disposal facility These hazardous waste storage areas have limits which are defined by the facility s current status as follows CESQG generator storage limits are nearly indefinite provided hazardous waste storage is never more than 1000 kg SQG generator up to 180 days and LQG generator up to 90 days Satellite Accumulation Area A temporary storage and collection area of hazardous waste near the point of generation which is under direct control of the person or operator generating the waste Waste in an approved satellite accumulation area is exempt from the 180 day time limit if other requirements are met NOTE Subject to considerable interpretation and constraints by various regulators Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator CESQG The Code of Federal Regulations CFR Title 40 Section 261 5 defines a CESQG as a generator of less than 100 kilograms per calendar month 100kg mo of hazardous wastes or 1kilogram per calendar month 1kg mo of acutely hazardous waste At no time can a CESQG have greater than 1000 kg of hazardous waste in storage Small Quantity Generator SQG A generator of hazardous wastes whom generates between 100 kg and 1000 kg of waste or less than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste in a calendar month At no time can a SQG have greater than 6000 kg of hazardous waste in storage Large Quantity Generator LQG A generator of hazardous waste who generates greater than 1000 kg or greater than 1 kg of acutely hazardous waste in a calendar month Procedures for Departments Generating Hazardous Wastes All hazardous waste shall be identified at the source A material does not become a waste until it can no longer be used for its intended purpose The words HAZARDOUS WASTE must be present on each container For departments generating Biohazardous Waste go to Management and Disposal of Biohazardous Waste Ensure that hazardous wastes are collected in appropriate containers which are compatible with the waste and can be tightly capped All hazardous waste shall be clearly labeled with all known constituents Be sure to include both the solvent s and solute s Particular emphasis shall be placed on identifying listed and characteristic components The START DATE shall be placed on the label on the date that waste is first added Do not put a date in the STORAGE DATE location The storage date will be completed when the container is moved from the generation point to the storage location Complete the other information on the label including department and or research group name of individual researcher supervisor providing the information and a phone number Shop departments should continue handling disposal of hazardous waste and contact Environmental Health and Safety when a container has been filled or a particular project generating waste has been completed for new directives as warranted Environmental Health and Safetywill maintain all records of hazardous waste manifests for a minimum of 3 years Do s and Don ts Do use an appropriate size container for the waste generated Under filled containers cost the same to dispose as those filled Don t overfill containers Leave approximately a one to two inch

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  • Env Health & Safety
    process including steam chemical exposure microwave shredding or incineration which changes the character or composition of biomedical waste to render it noninfectious D Responsibilities of the Biomedical Waste Generator Implement specific biomedical waste procedures in accordance with the requirements set forth in this document Identify and segregate biomedical waste from other waste streams at the point of origin Segregate contaminated sharps from non sharps biological waste Treat all biological waste known to contain NIH Risk Group 3 or 4 agents through autoclaving or other treatment method before it leaves the point of origin Manage biological waste mixed with hazardous waste as defined by Chapter 62 730 F A C as a hazardous waste Dispose of all radioactive waste according to the FGCU Radiation Safety Manual and Chapter 64E 5 F A C Properly package all biomedical waste prior to removal from the restricted area Package and seal all biomedical waste except loose sharps in impermeable red plastic bags inside the approved outer box The bags boxes and bins supplied by EH S and MWASTE meet the specifications of 64E 16 011 F A C Discard sharps at the point of origin into a sharps container Seal sharps containers when full The international biological hazard symbol at least one inch in diameter must be on all sharps containers Note Broken Glassware not contaminated with biological material goes into separate specially marked containers disposed in regular trash dumpsters Red bags for containment comply with the requirements of 64E 16 Documentation is maintained in the Biological Waste Manifest binder Place sealed biomedical waste bags and sealed sharps containers into the biomedical waste boxes provided by EH S MWaste Tape all of the box seams and do not overfill Mark or label the outside of the box with the point of origin room number name and date Place the box in the proper location for pick up by MWASTE personnel Note Transporters will not pick up improperly packaged unlabeled or leaking waste containers Place solid materials from a spill cleanup into an appropriate package and dispose as biomedical waste Clean any surface contaminated with biomedical waste with a solution of detergent to remove visible soil and then disinfect with a bleach solution alcohol or other appropriate germicidal solution Dispose of liquid waste from a chemical disinfection operation via the sanitary sewer system Train all employees who may handle biomedical waste according to the specific biomedical waste procedure Train employees on Definitions and Identification of Biomedical Waste Segregation Storage Labeling Transport Decontamination Containment and the Contingency Plan for waste Train employees before they come into contact with biomedical waste and annually thereafter Maintain a record of the training for at least 3 years E Storage and Containment Biomedical waste storage may not exceed 30 days The 30 day period begins when the first non sharps item of biomedical waste is generated or when a sharps container storing only sharps is sealed Indoor storage areas shall have restricted access and be designated in the specific biomedical

    Original URL path: http://www.fgcu.edu/EHS/BioHazardousWaste.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Env Health & Safety
    Sustainability Achievements ECOFGCU Involvement Opportunities Events Academics Research Campus as a Living Laboratory Featured Research Centers Institutes and Programs Living Sustainably Transportation Dining Housing Residence Life Recycling Campus Trails Wildlife Wellness Faculty Staff Sustainability Training Operational Initiatives Sustainability Benchmarks Progress Physical Plant Environmental Initiatives Programs Workplace Safety Injury and Illness Prevention Ergonomics Bloodborne Pathogens Inspections Safety Tips Near Miss Report Laboratory Safety Bloodborne Pathogens Chemical Hygiene Plan General Lab Health and Safety Waste Disposal Hazardous Waste Bio Hazardous Waste Risk Management University Insurance Information University Vehicles Camp Insurance Special Events Insurance FGCU Other Insurance Programs Hurricane Information Life Safety Insurance Procedures Resources Florida Statutes Administrative Code Weather Links Safety Risk Management Training Contact Information Phone 239 590 1414 Fax 239 590 1033 Email ehs fgcu edu Risk Management Welcome to Risk Management Risk Management is ready to assist all University Departments in treating loss exposures and in implementing loss prevention programs to limit potential losses We are responsible for coordinating the risk management activities of the University in the areas of property insurance general and automobile liability insurance workplace safety crime insurance campers insurance professional liability electronic data processing equipment miscellaneous property fine art and much more University Minimum Insurance

    Original URL path: http://www.fgcu.edu/EHS/RiskManagement.html (2016-02-07)
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