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  • Men of Color in Higher Education: New Models for Success
    to the invisibility of Native American history and education in the United States Perpetuated in settler colonialism the modern history of Native Americans has been severely altered by European colonialism Chapter four is entitled Masculinity Through a Male Latino Lens written by Victor B Sáenz and Beth E Bukoski Following an extensive account of feminist theoretical frameworks including Chicana feminism Sáenz and Bukoski highlight the importance of analyses focused on the gender gap in Latin populations They also explore the educational and community based impact of patriarchy and masculinity that influence Latino male success in educational institutions The fifth and final chapter is entitled Re setting the Agenda for College Men of Color Lessons Learned from a 15 Year Movement to Improve Black Male Success The chapter written by Shaun Harper explores scholarly work produced over fifteen years that has centered on Black male students Harper questions why the greater attention on Black men has not yielded higher student success in their educational experiences He argues that new initiatives for men of color must be strategic and not implemented at the expense of women of color Though Harper s essay does mention the four minority groups it would have been useful to include a broader concluding essay that addresses action steps and frameworks for educators to who will use this book as a guide for practice On many campuses racial and ethnic minorities are included in the broad demarcation of students of color or multicultural students separate from the larger campus population Therefore it might have been useful include a few notes for practitioners who work with the broader students of color population However at the core of intersectionality race and ethnicity operate as intersecting oppressions and where race ethnicity and gender meet there are specific conditions that must be analyzed Such is the case in this text where there is a separation of identities into embodiments with unique circumstances Each chapter provides its own set of recommendations for best practices in higher education For example in Chapter 3 Bitsól and Lee suggest that administrators enter into dialogue with members of the Native American communities that send their children to the school so both know exactly what each can do for the students p 77 The specificity of this cultural remedy exemplifies why the structure of the text was necessary The volume is advantageous as a point of initiation into understanding the multifariousness of gendered and racialized experiences within the higher education setting Scholars and practitioners interested in developing and undertaking programs and practices have to be more intentional in their work Indeed Williams introduced new foundations in the subtitle providing an underlying directive that it is imperative that programs are sufficiently supportive of and attentive to the specific needs of men of color This is particularly important as they attempt to navigate a system that is often isolating at times psychosocially violent and rife with expectations and a persistent university structure designed for and largely still beneficial to white

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-book-reviews/1105-men-of-color-in-higher-education-new-models-for-success (2015-06-03)
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  • The Madison Collaborative
    raised by the 8KQs in various contexts i e personal professional and civic as stated in the vision statement These learning outcomes are scaffolded to mimic the increasing complexity that they envision students developing as they gain exposure and practice with the framework and the offerings of the MC Origins and Development The MC and its 8KQs stemmed from JMU s 10 year re accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges SACSCOC After an inclusive deliberative solicitation and selection process the MC was selected as the main focus of the Quality Enhancement Plan QEP a proposed course of action for enhancing educational quality via student learning History In an insightful video about the development of the project the chair of the QEP Planning Committee Dr Lee Sternberger Executive Director of JMU s Office of International Programs describes the QEP development process as an opportunity for people across the campus community to engage in dialogue about who we really are at the institution and how that translates into the student learning environment Students faculty staff student affairs professionals alumni and parents all contributed to the conversation Senior administrative members also participated in the final thematic selection Visitors to the MC website can see another video in which JMU President Jonathan R Alger enthusiastically endorses the Ethical Reasoning in Action QEP because the concept applies in all the different areas of life across the university Key Components The 8KQs are integrated throughout the curricular and co curricular student experience at JMU During orientation all 4 300 new students participate in an event called It s Complicated in which they are divided into groups and work through a hypothetical ethical scenario using the 8KQ framework supported by discussion facilitators In the residence halls the 8KQ serve as lenses for discussing issues like alcohol use and sexual assault Sternberger 2013 A nine week online experience called Madison Collaborative Interactive is currently being piloted as a follow up to It s Complicated W Hawk personal communication April 1 2015 The MC blog also posts additional content related to ethical decision making Finally faculty incorporate the 8KQs in a range of coursework including both general education classes and classes for majors and minors Workshops have been an integral aspect of creating such a far reaching initiative A three hour core module serves as the foundational training regarding how to apply the 8KQ Sternberger 2013 This engaging challenging thought provoking workshop prepares faculty staff and administrators for additional developmental workshops that then focus on pedagogical or programmatic strategies for implementation MC Chair Dr William Hawk offers a diverse list of examples of where the 8KQs have enthusiastically been embraced across the institution student affairs programming judicial affairs the Health Center and academic affairs Assessment is another key component to the success of these efforts The student learning outcomes described above allow the MC to measure the effectiveness of their efforts with a pre test for first year students during their first week

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-best-practices/1104-the-madison-collaborative (2015-06-03)
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  • The Red Flag Campaign
    analyze the quality of collegiate relationships and differentiate between the key components of healthy relationships and abusive ones Data from initial focus groups with college students showed that students clearly understood and categorized physical forms of abuse but students required additional clarity around more insidious forms of violence such as emotional abuse coercive sexual relationships and isolating partners from family and friends As a result the campaign uses a bystander intervention model focusing its attention around peers and friends of victims and perpetrators of dating violence in a collegiate environment The campaign messaging encourages friends to say something and educates friends and peers about the red flags of dating violence Thus the campaign was named The Red Flag Campaign In 2006 The Red Flag Campaign introduced its message on ten Virginia campuses as a pilot program Of the ten campuses four received roughly 500 flags along with campaign posters to place in high traffic areas while the other six campuses received only posters Students were then surveyed in order to assess the significance of the impact the flags in combination with the posters made in comparison to campuses with posters only Out of 844 students surveyed on campuses with flags almost 430 students indicated they had heard of The Red Flag Campaign In contrast roughly 75 of the 282 students surveyed on campuses with only posters had not heard about the campaign This success prompted the full launch of the campaign in 2007 complete with posters flags and the Campus Planning Guide implementation toolkit on 18 Virginia campuses and has now grown to over 300 colleges universities and military installations in more than 45 states and into Canada Goals and Successes A unique eleme nt and goal of The Red Flag Campaign is utilizing the student voice to illustrate what warning signs sound like when spoken by a friend In efforts to achieve this goal the campaign implements posters of students representing different demographic populations that vary in race ethnicity and sexual orientation These posters serve as the face of The Red Flag Campaign and reflect authentic lived instances of students experiences and provide examples of language that college students can use when acting as an effective bystander McCord describes that through the student voice the campaign seeks to change social norms on college and university campuses Friends and peers are encouraged to step in when red flags of an abusive relationship appear and should no longer view abuse in relationships as a private matter McCord attributes the success of the campaign to the interdependence of student voice She finds that having student leadership within the launch programming and design implementation of the plan is what makes the campaign resonate so well with college students Additionally McCord states that campuses should use the bones of the campaign offered in the Campus Planning Guide and ask students to take the campaign and make it their own Future Leadership of The Red Flag Campaign envisions creating in person and online training tools

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-best-practices/1103-the-red-flag-campaign (2015-06-03)
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  • Jon C. Dalton Institute Live Blogging
    during Kristallnacht His father loved the opportunity to work with others to maintain ethical values in the community This exemplar motivated Dr Seligsohn to continually invest in and genuinely care about his community Implications were drawn from the stories told Dr Seligsohn expressed that actions matter Because his father lead by example Dr Seligsohn began to act ethically even before learning to articulate the principle of ethics This point was followed by Aristotle s view on how individuals become ethical Aristotle believed ethical behavior is learned through habituation and the individuals within communities instill ethical beliefs and values within one another through daily interaction Dr Seligsohn then proposed a hypothesis that guided his presentation The degrees to which universities demonstrate commitment to public goods will affect the degree to which students develop positive civic values Following the introduction of the hypothesis Dr Seligsohn proposed literature findings supporting his hypothesis such as a book titled Where is the Learning in Service Learning and data found through the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory PSRI Dr Seligsohn used the PSRI data set to express that students believe contribution to a larger community perspective taking and ethical and moral reasoning should be a major focus of institutions but college and universities do not focus on these topics as much as students think is necessary Additionally Dr Seligsohn noted that as students move into their fourth year at an institution the gap between what students think institutions should focus on and what the institution actually focuses on widens The presentation ended with implications for actions for University Leadership Faculty and Staff and Students University Leadership Commit to first generation and underrepresented students Actively reach out to this population through partnerships with K 12 schools Create a sustainable campus Ending Sexual assault This will send a strong signal showing how institutions value all students Building substantive partnership with the community Faculty and Staff Pursue coordinated projects across department and divisions Seek community impact Engage students in development and implementation Students Organize for the engaged campus Use establish channels to advocate Press for equality and democracy over exclusivity Pursue change not for yourself but for your successors Keynote Panel with the Graduate Students The graduate students of Florida State University s Higher Education Administration and Student Affairs program received the opportunity tonight to speak with Dr Alexander Astin Dr Shaun Harper Dr Will Barratt and Clare Cady In a panel style discussion master and doctoral students were able to ask each of the keynote speakers questions over pizza and refreshments Ali Raza a graduate student working with the Hardee Center at Florida State University moderated the discussion Questions ranged from personal experiences of working with students to advice on improving current student affairs practices One of the many thought provoking question posed asked how do you get through the frustrations of injustices and stay motivated to continue your work in higher education Dr Harper paused for a moment of reflection and began to answer He discussed how he cannot afford to become overwhelmed by injustices Historically slaves civil right activists and other influential figures did not lose motivation in times of hardship He went on to talk about personal wellness and how he sets clear boundaries to maintain motivation and resiliency in his work such as not writing on weekends or weeknights Dr Harper uses this time watching TV going to church concerts and enjoying life with his partner Dr Astin answered the question from a different perspective He challenged the students to realize everyone is capable of creating long term change For instance dilemmas that higher education faces today were far more problematic 50 years ago Reflecting on experiences from his college days Dr Astin explained that there have been profound changes regarding women s role in higher education Looking at the long term benefits of perseverance outweigh short term frustrations An additional question presented to the panelist asked for their opinions on how they contribute to the quality of higher education Clare Cady began by stating she was unsure if she contributed to the quality of higher education but she described the pride she feels when preparing a student to leave college with the ability to articulate their accomplishments beliefs and goals Dr Harper and Dr Astin similarly responded by claiming various teaching opportunities inside and outside the classroom is how they contribute to the quality of education Tomorrow will conclude the 2015 Jon C Dalton Institute on College Student Values We look forward to hearing from the final keynote speaker Dr Andrew Seligsohn and the closing panel titled Reflections on Next Steps to Minimizing Inequalities Lunch Awards Reception During today s lunch the Jon C Dalton Institute on College Student Values awarded Mission Possible the 2015 Best Practice of the Year Award and Dr Darris R Means the 2015 Dissertation of the Year Award Dr Jon Dalton was also recognized for his 25 years of heard work and was given a framed collection of the 25 different Dalton Institute logos in chronological order since the Institute s founding as well as a pen made out of the wood from the Old Wescott building at Florida State University Congratulations everyone for their hard work Keynote Speaker Dr Shaun Harper Today s Institute started off in the Askew Theatre with Dr Shaun Harper from the University of Pennsylvania His speech entitled A Racist Course of Study covered information about how college and universities unknowingly or unintentionally teach white students to devalue students of color Dr Harper began his speech by discussing the importance of focusing his topic on white students and list four reasons White students are still the majority Dr Harper elaborated on this point by using college demographic statistic at various large public institutions including Florida State University to demonstrate that students of color are largely underrepresented in higher education He went on to discuss that because white students are overrepresented in higher education they graduate in higher numbers and are also overrepresented in

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/institute-live-blog/1100-jon-c-dalton-institute-live-blogging (2015-06-03)
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  • Creative Writing
    short stories short screenplays short plays creative nonfiction and other forms of creative writing are eligible for consideration Language Writing should have inclusive language free disrespect and vulgarity Submissions should be sent to Character This email address is being protected

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/submissions/types-of-submissions/1099-creative-writing (2015-06-03)
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  • Home
    other types of articles Initiated by Jon C Dalton with a grant from the John Templeton Foundation it previously shared its home website with the Journal of College and Character This project is sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs at The Florida State University We invite college and university faculty administrators graduate students practitioners in student services and campus ministry as well as others engaged

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/200-uncategorised/1035-home?tmpl=component&print=1&page= (2015-06-03)
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  • Character Clearinghouse
    Email this link to a friend Close Window Email to Sender Your Email Subject Send Cancel

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&template=characterclearinghouse&link=bcd7d94fae621278543c4f0e0e4c0625333eb156 (2015-06-03)
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  • The Madison Collaborative
    professional and civic as stated in the vision statement These learning outcomes are scaffolded to mimic the increasing complexity that they envision students developing as they gain exposure and practice with the framework and the offerings of the MC Origins and Development The MC and its 8KQs stemmed from JMU s 10 year re accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges SACSCOC After an inclusive deliberative solicitation and selection process the MC was selected as the main focus of the Quality Enhancement Plan QEP a proposed course of action for enhancing educational quality via student learning History In an insightful video about the development of the project the chair of the QEP Planning Committee Dr Lee Sternberger Executive Director of JMU s Office of International Programs describes the QEP development process as an opportunity for people across the campus community to engage in dialogue about who we really are at the institution and how that translates into the student learning environment Students faculty staff student affairs professionals alumni and parents all contributed to the conversation Senior administrative members also participated in the final thematic selection Visitors to the MC website can see another video in which JMU President Jonathan R Alger enthusiastically endorses the Ethical Reasoning in Action QEP because the concept applies in all the different areas of life across the university Key Components The 8KQs are integrated throughout the curricular and co curricular student experience at JMU During orientation all 4 300 new students participate in an event called It s Complicated in which they are divided into groups and work through a hypothetical ethical scenario using the 8KQ framework supported by discussion facilitators In the residence halls the 8KQ serve as lenses for discussing issues like alcohol use and sexual assault Sternberger 2013 A nine week online experience called Madison Collaborative Interactive is currently being piloted as a follow up to It s Complicated W Hawk personal communication April 1 2015 The MC blog also posts additional content related to ethical decision making Finally faculty incorporate the 8KQs in a range of coursework including both general education classes and classes for majors and minors Workshops have been an integral aspect of creating such a far reaching initiative A three hour core module serves as the foundational training regarding how to apply the 8KQ Sternberger 2013 This engaging challenging thought provoking workshop prepares faculty staff and administrators for additional developmental workshops that then focus on pedagogical or programmatic strategies for implementation MC Chair Dr William Hawk offers a diverse list of examples of where the 8KQs have enthusiastically been embraced across the institution student affairs programming judicial affairs the Health Center and academic affairs Assessment is another key component to the success of these efforts The student learning outcomes described above allow the MC to measure the effectiveness of their efforts with a pre test for first year students during their first week and a post test for second year students at the

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-best-practices/1104-the-madison-collaborative?tmpl=component&print=1&page= (2015-06-03)
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