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  • PeaceJam
    Connect with Us Twitter Facebook PeaceJam http www peacejam org home aspx The mission of the PeaceJam Foundation is to create young leaders committed to positive change in themselves their communities and the world through the inspiration of Nobel Peace

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/resources/170-student-movements/763-peacejam (2015-06-03)
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  • SustainUS
    Perspectives CC Readings Jon C Dalton ICSV Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook SustainUS http www sustainus org SustainUS is a nonprofit nonpartisan organization of young people advancing sustainable development and youth empowerment in the United States Through proactive education research and advocacy at the policy making and grassroots levels we are building a future in which all people recognize the inherent equality and interdependence of social economic and

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/resources/170-student-movements/762-sustainus (2015-06-03)
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  • Making a World of Difference: Young Adults as Servant Leaders – Rachel Rosenberg
    light unto the nations striving to repair the world tikkun olam through deeds of loving kindness gimilut chasadim After Shabbat dinner each Friday night my mother read a selection from Rabbi Joseph Telushkin s highly practical Book of Jewish Values always followed by a family discussion I learned early on that the Hebrew word often translated as charity tzedakah literally means justice something that is mandatory because it is right regardless of whether you personally feel moved by compassion My high school had a community service program that required freshmen to volunteer with children and I chose to do my service at M yuchad Special a non denominational Sunday school for Jewish children with severe cognitive disabilities After my initial volunteer hours were completed I was hired as a teacher s aide and worked there until I graduated I developed my passion for child advocacy as I became close to some of the children and their families and witnessed firsthand the parents struggles to get the children the services they needed And these were relatively wealthy well resourced parents At the same time I attended weekly Hebrew High School at my synagogue where I enrolled in programs such as the Jewish Civics Initiative which focuses on civic engagement leadership and service driven by Jewish values and Shalom Y all a class on the Civil Rights Movement and its connections to Judaism Both courses augmented my conception of Jews as ideally progressive actors in society Shalom Y all culminated in a week long winter break trip to Selma Birmingham and Montgomery Alabama and Atlanta Georgia Intrigued by Atlanta a city entirely different from my hometown of San Jose California I decided to attend Emory University 5 How did your student experiences in such courses as Religion Human Rights and Civil Society Suffering Healing and Redemption and Human Goodness help to shape your worldview Together these three classes profoundly shaped my worldview and my decision to work in the field of juvenile justice In Suffering Healing and Redemption I developed deep empathy for a diverse group of sufferers from Oedipus and Job to the Rwandan Tutsis and Haitian victims of structural violence to those living with chronic illnesses The case studies we contemplated in Human Goodness led me to believe that despite popular belief humans have innate capacity for good rather than overwhelming inherent selfishness Last Religion Human Rights and Civil Society taught me about the complexity and importance of developing social systems and structures that harness the positive qualities of humanity to ensure that all are treated at least decently These three lessons led me to my current profession In the public defender world we are often asked How can you defend those people It is really very simple I have empathy for my clients all of whom are suffering greatly and almost all of whom have innate goodness that has simply been overwhelmed by poverty and racism On an individual level my clients deserve and need an advocate Perhaps more

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/1038-rachel-rosenberg (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students — Edward Queen
    Additionally the breadth of perspectives plays a major role in its success particularly when you bring together a group of students who are willing to be challenged by different perspectives When that happens true engagement and learning happen 8 Describe briefly the Summer Internship Program What are some of the greatest obstacles you have experienced in organizing and implementing the Summer Internship Program and how have you worked to solve them The Servant Leadership Summer is a funded summer internship program that places qualified Emory University students in Atlanta area nonprofits government agencies and socially responsible businesses The Servant Leadership Summer internship program is designed to enrich the student s life and integrate the practical intellectual and spiritual components of work while deepening understandings of responsibility service and vocation The Summer Program includes an orientation weekly class sessions projects and a minimum of 240 hours of work at your placement site Students receive a 4000 stipend Honestly the greatest obstacle is finding the funding for the stipends The program has roughly tripled in size during my ten years as director and I have increased the size of the stipend I remain committed to the program being paid There are serious equity issues with unpaid internships As Cokie Roberts stated in testimony before Congress which was quoted in the New York Times U npaid internship programs set up a system where you are making it ever more difficult for people who don t have economic advantages to catch up Lee 2004 p 1 The demand is there I receive around 250 applications and intentionally limit my advertising so I could be receiving far more Of those applicants easily half are more than qualified for the program I spend more time seeking funding than I thought I would when I took the position Fortunately several of the organizations provide some partial funding for the stipend Our partnership with Emory s Center for Community Partnerships has led to support for five six students working with community environmental groups That funding comes from the Coca Cola Foundation And the Belk Company has proven to be a generous and engaged funder over the past couple of years as well as being a great booster for the program So as much as I hate to say it money remains the biggest challenge 9 As a professor of religion you have researched and taught about different religious worldviews There is a certain paradox about inclusive worldviews for example some campus leaders and students might say that pluralism is only one interpretation of religion or worldview and being inclusive is actually having an exclusive worldview in that pluralism by its very definition excludes non pluralistic views How would you address a group of students and community members who might bring up this paradox This is a great question in fact I have loved most of these questions because they have allowed me to discuss some of the most important issues I face but they are the questions I rarely get asked Raymond Geuss in his book The Idea of a Critical Theory 1981 says that any true utopia must include those who oppose it So in some form pluralism must include anti pluralists Most importantly however I think we need to clarify what is meant by pluralism By that term I do not believe that everything is equally valid good or true Some things are evil wretched beastly and immoral For me pluralism is more about a quest for the true and the good It assumes that there is a great deal of goods in this world and that no one way of being in the world necessarily can accommodate all of them Just a quick example one cannot have both absolute freedom and absolute security Both of these are goods My version of pluralism would say that there is a continuum along which societies in this case could be arranged emphasizing varying degrees of the mix of the two and still be morally acceptable It also would say that at some point along the continuum in either direction you would reach a limit beyond which the structure of the social organization would be morally evil In the study of religion something similar is going on I start with the assumption that there is something transcendent that we can denominate the divine and that all religious traditions attempt to apprehend and venerate Some ways of doing this are better than others I would argue that human sacrifice is a not so good and even wrong way to do so Good ways of realizing those goals are then transferable from one tradition to another This is the point of natural theology There is a traditional hermeneutic which one could see in the Scholastic tradition but preeminently so in Maimonides that starts with the view that anything good or true is from the Divine It therefore is irrelevant who discovers it speaks it writes it Truth is truth and should be recognized as such regardless of its source That returns me to my view of pluralism as a quest for the good it sends one on a search for those truths no matter where they may reside or whence they come 10 What is your favorite EASL story or one of your favorites It is less a story although I have lots of them but was more a student comment The student was in both of the programs and in discussing the experience with someone she made the following comment Dr Queen s teaching style is unlike any I have encountered before He has an in your face kind of way of speaking but you know he is challenging everything you believed in a way that is not offensive but makes you want to rise to the challenge and prove him wrong This was a student who got it She was engaged passionate and aware She knew or learned that ideas matter and that you have to engage with them

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/1034-queen (2015-06-03)
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  • Making a World of Difference: Young Adults in International Service – Carly Nasehi
    lasting memories include meeting Iranian religious minorities who hoped to start new lives in the U S through the State Department s refugee resettlement program my rotation at our United Nations Vienna mission and attending the International Atomic Energy Agency s annual ball at the Hofburg palace With alpaca baby b Embassy Bangkok I will never forget visiting two refugee camps on the Thai Burma border For 20 years Burmese refugees have been settling in Thailand camps The protracted situation however makes these camps more like villages Although the camps have their own governing structures businesses schools and multiple generations the Thai government prohibits permanent structures and has yet to grant a legal status to tens of thousands of Burmese refugees within its borders I went with my coworkers in the embassy s Refugee Affairs Section to monitor and evaluate the NGOs contracted by the U S Department of State to run assistance and resettlement programs c Refugee Admissions at State Department The Refugee Processing Center This is where the approximate 82 000 refugees who are resettled to the U S every year are assigned their destination in the U S The resettlement organizations that assist the refugees with this process are located throughout the country A representative from these organizations meets at the RPC every week to determine who will be resettled where I attended a few times and witnessed what is a complicated and fascinating process Juggling the political with the possible Congressional testimonies I remember attending a Congressional testimony by the assistant secretary of the State Department s Bureau of Population Refugees and Migration Congress was asking why Iraqis who had assisted the U S and thus qualified a special immigrant visa to relocate to the U S weren t getting process through the refugee resettlement program quickly enough a clear political priority I learned about the relationship between Congress and the State Department as well as the challenges of juggling priorities of the administration d UN General Assembly President Obama came to speak twice during my internship Again the way the international community looked to him for guidance was impressed upon me The respect he commanded from the standing room only General Assembly hall was unforgettable and unmatched by any other leader during the entire session I witnessed first hand opposition against a U S policy by nearly every single country in the international community when the entire GA voted in favor of condemning the U S s embargo on Cuba other than Israel and the U S itself of course The body has done this as a matter of course every year for the last 20 years It is largely symbolic but it still stung That was a rough day but I learned that we must consider though not necessarily bend to it the international community s critiques of our policies e Clinton Global Initiative GCI President Clinton known for his communication skills came to speak to us interns one day Though he shared many

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/1000-carly-nasehi (2015-06-03)
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  • Making a World of Difference: Faculty Who Promote the Global Engagement Experience – Stephen McDowell
    Choice freedom and ethics can extend to other areas It s useful to have public conversations in many settings about what is good and what should be valued whether socially or personally Universities can and should serve as places to support that thinking and questioning And as noted above it s the type of questions and conversations that help develop leadership For example questions about climate change are part of a contemporary debate that raises a whole range of issues and potential responses including our personal roles and connects our communities with those around the world In the United States one example that keeps coming up is the Peace Corps volunteers The program was strongest in the 1960s and 1970s Although this was a program that enlisted mainly young people in international service work it provided a practical way to work out a variety of questions Many of these people have subsequently shaped U S institutions and communities by serving in leadership roles In the context of service and volunteer work and international experiences there are ways to raise questions about citizenship and about connections with our domestic and international community I did some service work in Mississippi and Arkansas and took away at least some unanswered questions and not fully formed understandings about other people and culture To push this a bit further we might even propose a hierarchy of value It is legitimate to think about personal career goals since developing our skills in a work setting is for many one of the main ways we interact with the world along with developing our sense of self and personhood Acquiring wealth is only part of the picture Much of what we value in society is produced in homes and by voluntary and non profit groups Trying to serve others and broadening the scope of our community are of greater value than wealth acquisition We don t have to wait until we are financially secure to advance causes that promote higher values 6 In college life today students are encouraged to join many activities and options at a time of considerable personal freedom Do you think that a college can encourage students too much to be involved in co curricular activities Why or why not Do you think there should be more efforts in connecting student activities to their academic experiences Why or why not Co curricular activities may be the best available settings to develop leadership skills build experience at working with others in collaboration enrich key communication and problem solving skills and apply ideas and concepts arising from course materials We sponsor many enrichment activities in our school such as the speech and debate teams a student public relations society chapter an advertising team and advertising club work with media on campus organizations such as V89 the student radio station Seminole Productions a sports media auxiliary and WFSU the PBS NPR affiliate as well as internship placements in off campus organizations Involvement in these activities has the benefit of building capacities and relationship networks that are very relevant to professional practice and career development but also provides opportunities to think about and work at larger social problems 7 Many of your students have come from various countries and cultures What are some of the ways that you may have encouraged students to maintain their distinctiveness and pride in their own cultures while learning about other cultures relating to others respecting difference and sharing in a diverse community Students main interactions with other cultures are through their coursework and a few social events and interactions with guest speakers that our school sponsors For instance we host visiting scholars and journalists and also have a number of international guest speakers Across campus there is a rich range of opportunities of events presentations and clubs for students to learn about other cultures Some students take advantage of as many opportunities as there are available others less so There are not as many opportunities for interaction as there could be and this is something we need to address 8 Describe one way that social media have influenced intercultural communication of college students today that you see as having both positive and negative impact Since much of our knowledge of the world comes through some media platform building critical skills for media literacy is crucial in examining how we obtain and use that information to form our views about the world and different places and cultures When we read or see a media representation about a local person or event we might have some alternative route to check that information Most people don t have that for international events For instance I do research on media in South Asia which has included many trips to India and Pakistan This has given me the privilege of meeting and talking to many people mainly academics and journalists As a result I have a different sense of these societies and people than I otherwise would While mass media representations of specific issues in these countries may be accurate at the best of times they reflect our priorities and selection of issues that are important and we have to think about this as we form our views Some people think that social media can help us escape biases by offering other sources of information or direct contact with those in other countries However avoiding bias still takes efforts and there may need to be a link of a shared interest or shared language to get started That s why personal contact with students from other countries on campus can be an important source of information and new perspectives While social media can expand the number and types of people we can connect with in many cases these connections may be limited to people with whom we already have a connection and some shared experiences For instance many of my Linked In connections are former students who are spread out all over the world or colleagues whom

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/1004-global-engagement-mcdowell (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire—L. Patton
    while your body is at its most vigorous and some major insights arise as a result As a dean I have also become deeply committed to the practice of contemplation in action a way of cultivating contemplative mind while in the midst of a high speed professional life of minute by minute executive decisions This practice really came home to me when I was working on the translation of the Bhagavad Gita If you cultivate a mindful approach to executive decisions you are able remind yourself of the grounding principles behind every decision you make In addition if you are committed to being present fully present to everyone that walks in your door that is also contemplation in action This kind of meditation is also like meditation while swimming You are in the midst of high speed vigorous mental action and high speed interpersonal action and yet are committed to cultivating a mindful center at the heart of all of it 5 You write that you were inspired by Simone Weil s Reflections on the Right Use of School Studies with A View to the Love of God 1951 You argue that study is itself a form of contemplation and needs to be marked that way ritually marked Patton 2011 p 40 Discuss your concept of framing a text before one begins to study and how this relates to contemplation Even more these days because my time for writing and research is so precious I think it is important to honor and frame the time and the activity of study One of the most frequent things young scholars tell me is how difficult it is to switch gears from teaching to research in particular And I think this switching of gears is difficult because we tend not to mark out the sphere of study as a sacred activity When I studied at the University of Edinburgh in college my study carrel was next to a monk who would pray whenever he sat down to prepare for the next day s classes At first I was distracted by it especially because he would do it all the time even after he got up to use the bathroom and then came back But then I would miss it if he wasn t there And soon I found myself doing something similar in my own more secular manner as a way of marking the passage from engagement in the world to study of the world The Jewish tradition also has a ritual of saying a blessing before studying the Torah I find this very helpful as a kind of everyday meditative practice which marks a key transition There is a Hebrew saying that Scholars create peace in the world And I think such an insight begins with an understanding of the sacredness of study 6 In what ways are our colleges and universities encouraging students to multitask How do you think this practice which is becoming more common in contemporary life might be related to students communication and thinking skills and behaviors According to many curators scholars etc we are living in an age of multi tasking distraction and a society of run away minds I think for students especially their lives are not exclusively challenged by the quality of the material world or their quality of relationships or the quality of their society Their lives are challenged by their quality of mind We have a world of focusing exercises because it is impossible to focus The practice of meditation has increased dramatically and so has the number of distraction related accidents at home and on the road Among the growing new science of attention there is mounting concern about the number of devices we use at one time even when we are not driving and scientists now argue that a good social experiment is not to give people new devices and see what they do with them but rather to take away all devices from people to see what they can do without them if they can exist if they can work if they can live without a sense of deprivation similar to that of the detoxification tremors that people undergoing treatment for drug addiction sometimes suffer In response to this there is the slow media movement a group that encourages us to move away from such mental states But at the same time a variety of studies suggest that a certain kind of organized multitasking where activities are foregrounded and backgrounded can be quite productive I think this productivity might be harnessed in the classroom In my experience students like the idea of switching from computer to writing to discussion and back And sometimes they learn better when they do so Students also understand sociality and connectedness through on line media This is not a loss of relationship but a way of living in relationship both on and off line I use this on line and off line sociality all the time in my teaching Students hunger for learning is no different even if their hunger is mediated differently I don t think this necessarily goes against contemplative practice per se Even the slow media movement does not ask us to get rid of computers cell phones I PODS and all the other accoutrements of our communicative lives Rather it encourages us to have an entirely different mental attitude to our electronic gadgets in which we no longer use them to distract us but to understand the universe in a slower more contemplative way 7 Why do you argue that study and sustained attention are very vital in academic life Patton 2011 How might we connect the act of sustained attention with the disposition of rigorous analysis p 42 How can sustained attention practices be integrated in the physical and virtual classroom I think there are a variety of ways in which we can integrate sustained attention practices into the classroom The first is to slow down classroom discussion to allow students to think out loud In a classroom of good students there is a tendency to produce rapid fire debate I do this myself all the time and love the give and take of such debates And I am one of the most distracted people on the planet But in recent years I have slowed down my own response time and my own questions of students as a way of modeling the fact that we can allow each other to think even as we are engaged in debate Second I think we can take time in the classroom to focus on small things such as a single sentence in a translation and its multiple possibilities of meaning This is a straightforward thing for a student of literature or language for example I had a colleague who taught Sanskrit very slowly and some people complained about the speed Others were transformed by it and loved the language because of it But I also think it can be true in the sciences and social sciences as well Third I think it is key to introduce the idea of contemplation in action particularly verbal action How do we inspire the Buddhist idea of right speech in our students even in the midst of academic debate I consistently give my students conversational rules of debate about the role of respecting persons even in the midst of vehement disagreement I tell them about the service of helping their fellow students to make their arguments better This idea of contemplation in verbal action is essential not only to in person debate but also in on line behavior The work of Lance Bennett in encouraging civil discourse and digital citizenship on line is crucial to this idea of contemplation in verbal action 8 How do you think social media Facebook Twitter etc have influenced students reflective time and quiet time Are there ways to integrate social media such that they can enhance students contemplative life Duke is a leader in the world of digital learning and it is a great blessing to see how we are using social media to help focus attention I have learned a great deal from my colleague Cathy Davidson on the potential of social media for education There are now world wide chat rooms that are essentially 24 hour global study groups where students focus on helping each other in solving key problems Duke students use these all the time Students are organizing for service learning in Durham through social media These are all ways in which could harness both educational and contemplative potential For example at Duke there are researchers such as Kate Hayles who are creating more contemplative texts which help the reader focus on a single word and read more slowly through electronic media I think we have only begun to explore the contemplative possibilities of electronic media 9 You are a professor of religious studies There is a certain paradox about inclusive worldviews for example some campus leaders and students might say that pluralism is only one interpretation of religion or worldview and being inclusive is actually having an exclusive worldview in that pluralism by its very definition excludes non pluralistic views How would you address a group of students and campus leaders who might bring up this paradox I have begun to write about this idea in a variety of formal and informal venues Here s the way I see it The study of religion is forced to partake in the perennial paradox of liberalism It must insist on tolerance and inclusion of others religious voices even as it argues with those religious voices which are not tolerant As Wendy Steiner 1997 describes this paradox I n a state controlled by fundamentalist ideas the liberal cannot speak but in a state controlled by liberal ideas a fundamentalist cannot act The ideas of a fundamentalist are exclusionary and performative i e valid only when turned into actions an article of faith is not a mere topic of discussion to the believer Thus the liberal in insisting on tolerance is insisting on not only his idea but his practice In the considerable commentary about the Rushdie affair in America the absolute value of tolerance or free speech emerges as a point of dogmatic blindness for some and a logical embarrassment for others Leon Wieseltier states without irony Let us be dogmatic about tolerance but for Norman Mailer the issue is not so easy We believe in freedom of expression as an absolute How dangerous to use the word absolute p 123 The scholar of religion insists and has traditionally insisted that everyone must practice tolerance even as his or her analytic categories imply judgment This liberal paradox is also related to another feature of our odd sort of arbitrary pluralism our zeal to locate ourselves in the multiple shifting universe In the early twenty first century we are coming face to face with the failure of the great unacknowledged Romantic Ideal of the post modern perspective that if we only locate ourselves that somehow it would be all better Naming our locatedness has not made it all better It has not necessarily produced better scholarship And it has frequently made those who would prefer not to be located more angry This is the sad challenge of our generation of historians of religion But in all this sad and blooming confusion the secular study of religion in all its blooming confusion is alive and kicking If we define the secular study of religion as the number of undergraduates enrolled in religion courses or in the number of PhDs in the field we have seen a marked increase in the past two decades in both areas We are 1 20th of the majors in the country we offer 38 of the courses in any given semester s curriculum in our doctoral programs we have gone from a very low percentage of departments offering courses in non Christian traditions three decades ago to 59 in Buddhism 49 in Hinduism and 49 in Islam Even more intriguingly such tradition specific courses in religions other than Christianity are on the whole 20 more frequently offered at public and private non sectarian universities and colleges than they are at Catholic and Protestant institutions If such courses define the secular study of religion we have grown enormously Religion and Theology Programs Census 2001 Hardly evidence of a dying field Now these statistics could be evidence perhaps of a certain kind of decadence the kind of intellectual society that thrives on decay the last efflorescence of an organism Or the study of religion might resemble James one of the main characters in Elizabeth McCracken s fine first novel In the Giant s House 1996 James is an adolescent boy who grows a foot each year and quietly knows that because of his gargantuan growth he is going to die soon Perhaps as a relatively new field the study of religion is in that kind of adolescent overdrive that can lead to death Or perhaps many of the very recent trends in higher enrollments in religion classes could simply be due to the aftereffects of 9 11 and the vague public sense that people do very extreme things for ostensibly religious reasons 10 What is your favorite personal academic Dean story so far My favorite Dean story has to do with the matching of dreams Another institution was chasing after phenomenal faculty member something that happens a lot at Duke And when I asked that faculty member what his dreams were about building intellectual community they happened to be the same as mine And as a result we were able to build something together far faster than I had thought While the job has its enormous challenges at its best much of being a dean is like that the acceleration of one s dreams into reality 11 Class sizes are becoming larger and many more courses are offered online Universities are becoming small cities where individuals make few personal contacts Will teaching students to find alone time and to be contemplative and reflective increase their sense of isolation I don t think so at all I think students need that time to do three things integration adaptation and integration Here s how I argued for it in my first Arts Sciences address As I see it our job in Arts Sciences is not to educate our students for our world but rather to prepare them for their own The culture that we create must anticipate the future it must predict with a fair degree of accuracy what kinds of skills a person will need four years from now in order to make those everyday decisions that create a reflective engaged connected and meaningful life in other words a life worth living and a life connected to the big ideas and other people I have come to the sense that a twenty first century education requires three skills all of which I believe an Arts Sciences education at both the graduate and undergraduate levels can uniquely provide Those three skills are innovation adaptation and integration We know these three words We probably use them in our everyday decisions In fact I have chosen them because I have heard them in everyday conversations since my arrival at Duke But I think they are uniquely situated to help us continue to be an international example in interdisciplinary approaches to knowledge Let me begin with innovation Innovation is not only the capacity to discover new laws of nature and society It is sometimes defined and I think well defined as a change that creates new meaning for the stakeholders in a culture Our innovations therefore are in the re mix information laden culture we now live in as much in new combinations of information of data of social networks as in the discovery of new laws of nature Both forms of discovery are important for innovation to occur But we would have not included research into and about databases and thoughtful consideration of the economies of scale in data collection in our undergraduate students research plans twenty years ago Only a few of us would have considered such kinds of innovation as a skill which our students need to make everyday decisions in their lives We do now Additionally at the graduate level such skill in assessing and mining information is needed in almost all the forms of specialization Duke provides We are teaching our students to learn to innovate and put those innovations to use in the world The second is adaptation Adaptation is not only the ability to be flexible but the ability to imagine ways of thinking and working and living that have never existed before On the one hand this is a major challenge It is a challenge because of what Tom Friedman in a recent article also circulated by Provost Lange called the need for The Start up of You 2011 Students today need to respond to changing conditions more quickly than ever before I put Friedman s point slightly differently the life script for students both undergraduate and graduate is barely legible today In my parents generation in America there was a script and those who did not follow it were the clear exceptions In my own generation there were larger numbers of people who departed from the script but they knew the script from which they were departing Today it is harder and harder to discern what the script is When students graduate from college they increasingly must create their own job When they receive a PhD they increasingly must find ways to adapt their specialties into the marketplace that may not immediately see the relevance of that knowledge So adaptation becomes a paramount skill indeed a crucial one in a world where everyday decisions have consequences that we can predict less and less In the Arts Sciences we teach our students to imagine those

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/907-enlightenment-patton (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students—L. Rendón
    together reflection allows students to examine closely how the experiences influence them social action helps students connect purpose and meaning with recognition of the need to serve others Consequently student affairs and faculty says Rendón should develop a clear framework that connects contemplative education with intellectual development This requires a new way of looking at educating students in order that colleges and universities focus more attention to holistic student development that includes inner knowing which helps to balance the intellectual social emotional and spiritual aspects of the whole person While one of the goals of the college experience should be to educate a deeply reflective and socially responsible person the model that is often followed is one that focuses exclusively on conceptual knowing intense individualism and monoculturalism Rendón provides some sage advice for faculty to help achieve this important balance of student learning and experience The goal is to build a community within the classroom that is reflective of students backgrounds and needs and focuses on personal growth and voice care for the other and diverse ways of knowing First before teachers lead students in various forms of reflection they need to learn to adopt some form of contemplative practice in their lives so that they can authentically position themselves as reflective leaders and teachers Second they should also offer many different types of instructional activities that emphasize students active engagement while balancing reflective practice group work and service learning Rendón describes a specific assignment that she has found to help build a reflective and caring classroom community This activity was first introduced by University of San Diego professor Alberto Pulido In this activity students create a box called a cajita that contains artifacts representative of significant aspects of their lives These aspects include their perceived identity persons who have influenced them and their hopes in making a difference in others lives The cajitas are displayed in the classroom so that students may observe them in a quiet gallery walk Those students who want to share and describe the meaning of their cajita symbols present their project to the class In her course for student affairs professionals students display in their boxes representations of what type of student affairs professionals they want to be Often students recount lives of pain says Rendón but also of resilience This class assignment is always the students favorite she explains and helps to create a bonding community that grows out of balancing the personal and social experiences of her students Rendón realizes that such an assignment would be difficult in a large class environment made up of hundreds of students That is why it is very important that smaller communities be created within classes as well as in student organizations on campus she explains In addition she notes that with more and more online courses being added to the college curriculum teachers must be more inventive in trying to create time for face to face interaction among students and instructor Although Rendón knows that

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/906-enlightenment-rendon (2015-06-03)
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