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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students—G. Paine
    planning to introduce or expand contemplative education and participation programs on your campus If so please describe those How would you characterize the type of reflection that students faculty and student affairs professionals need I ve only been on the campus at The University of Texas at Austin UT Austin for five weeks so I don t yet know what will make sense for this campus The workshop we did at Trinity University was different from the workshops and programs we did at the University of Texas at San Antonio UTSA It will be a while before I know what makes sense to bring to UT Austin In the same way I don t believe that there is a one size fits all for the kinds of contemplative and reflective programs that will work for all campuses There is no single type of reflection needed by students faculty and staff For example I like a style of reflection that is solitary and usually written Others are more comfortable thinking out loud and processing with a group Some people need some structure and find responding to questions helpful while others prefer a blank page or some other open ended style Others need to move and find running or walking most helpful But there is one element that I do believe is essential to contemplation and reflection silence and silence requires time and space Why is it so important In a workshop with Margaret Wheatley she asked a variety of questions and asked us to write down the answers because writing it down captures the thought That is as good an explanation of the importance of reflection as I know We need to take time to fully assimilate what we have learned from an experience and reflection helps us articulate and capture the learning for ourselves I find using multiple forms of expression helps as does using multiple sensory experiences That s why writing talking with others and moving through space are all useful methods for reflective practice But we have to create a safe space for ourselves and others We have to stop the busyness and take time to pay attention to the experiences we are having 4 How do you think social media Facebook Twitter etc have influenced students reflective time and quiet time Are there ways to integrate social media such that they can enhance students contemplative life How do you see contemplative practices helping to connect intellectual understandings with reflective experience in the educational process I wish I knew the answer to these questions I have found great benefit from connecting with students and other professionals through Facebook and Twitter Still it concerns me when I see students walk out of class and immediately put in the ear buds or check out the screen I wonder when they experience silence I know walking from class or from a meeting can be a time of reflection I know that when I have meeting after meeting after meeting and don

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/900-enlightenment-paine (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students—E. Storlie
    teachers that claim to be working on their behalf Teaching these practices encourages students to take charge of their lives very broadly and gives them tools 8 You were a professor of English for many years How can English professors and professors of other disciplines integrate meditation instruction in their courses Should they do you think Why or why not I can think of no course where five minutes of attentive silence wouldn t be a good way to begin Beyond that it would depend entirely on the professor and the subject matter how far in depth such work might go or what relationship it might have to the material In any case an open calm attention can promote creativity and spontaneity as well as intellectual insight 9 How do you think social media Facebook Twitter etc have influenced students reflective time and quiet time Are there ways to integrate social media such that they can enhance students contemplative life The destructive potential is obvious And I see it all the time and students talk freely about how addictive these media are But at the same time students have used these things to organize student mindfulness activities to stay in touch etc So there are possibilities These are useful tools But students need to recognize how quickly they become toxic 10 What are some of the greatest obstacles you have experienced in your Zen practice and teaching How have you coped with them The greatest obstacle is when the idealistic goal of achieving some exalted state of consciousness gets in the way of being fully in the present moment which is actually what meditation is all about But being fully in the present moment sounds easy It isn t There is an effort of attention an effort that can blossom into effortlessness a flow or zone state 11 What is your favorite teaching story of undergraduates I am always touched by the stories I get that are much like this one At the end of the semester a year or so ago a very bright shy serious young woman stood up and said words to this effect I paraphrase I didn t take this class intending to share my story I don t do those things and I m surprised that I m doing it right now I ve struggled my whole life with perfectionism with always having to be the best and always falling short and judging myself harshly Usually before I took any exam I knew I d spend the morning vomiting and barely able to function I didn t really think this class would help too much and during the semester things had been about the same but this week I got up in the morning and knowing I had a very important test I expected to be sick I watched my body fill with agitation and get ready to be sick But I could just watch it and it just went away in about ten minutes

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/899-enlightenment-storlie (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students: Anne Carolyn Klein/ Rigzin Drolma
    skills meditation practices information wisdom tradition that could enrich others What has been your greatest challenge as founding director Connecting with the different wishes and needs of people who attend and the very different interests and levels of people who may gather together for any particular sequence of teachings or retreats 4 How do you see your feminist and Buddhist philosophy informing your teaching What are specific needs that young female students have that can be addressed by contemplative studies and practices Both feminists and Buddhists are interested in exploring the limits of ordinary styles of self conception in questioning the answers our cultures give us about who and what we are long before we even know enough to question these There s also a shared valuing of the kind of power that is not over and against divide and conquer but comes from simply being present seeing knowing and being deeply grounded in what one knows Young women and young men too definitely benefit from a chance to own who they are and that ownership comes when one is able to sense fairly deeply within to see what is there what is more and less authentic This is where the life skill of attention or what Buddhists call mindfulness becomes very central 5 How can recognizing that human beings are dynamic and impermanent selves no self according to Buddhist teachings help us to be more compassionate toward others How is it possible to be focused on an object replete with meaning and empty of content 1995 p 143 Both ideas seem counterintuitive They may be conceptually at odds but experientially they are not When it comes to lived experience they are in fact very compatible Think of the comfort of just looking out into space or at the ocean or gardening knitting simple sitting in the sun These things feel enriching But it s not because there is cognitive content there Also No self simply means no self as we ordinarily understand it It no way means that we don t exist We do and that existence is dynamic 6 Tell us about your Contemplative Practicum that you teach at Rice I teach it as a life skill focusing on the cultivation of attention Attention is really a way of caring and so provides a natural bridge to the cultivation of kindness We also take some time to contemplate the existential realities of life like impermanence death and the need for skillful use of one s time 7 Class sizes are becoming larger and many more courses are offered online Can teaching students to spend more time alone and to be contemplative and reflective increase their sense of isolation It can Even more important is when people see the benefit of meditating in a group sitting silently with others supporting contemplation by one s sheer presence At the same time learning to explore within helps connect one with oneself and this is the real key to connecting with others

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/898-klein-enlightenment (2015-06-03)
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  • Sources of Enlightenment: Faculty and Administrators Who Challenge and Inspire Their Students—Arthur Zajonc
    situations for which they are not prepared Some people can be overly sensitive to extensive and intensive meditation sessions As a result it is important that course instructors and student affairs professionals who have not had training and experience in meditation practice only teach basic meditation practices to their students These practices include focusing on the breath or on a simple object for short periods of time For those who want to know more about integrating meditation practice into their instruction and curricula there are many rich opportunities that faculty and others can utilize In fact there is an increasing number of professors and senior officers in the academy attending conferences and education sessions specifically on contemplative pedagogy CP For example each year at Smith College a week long session on CP is offered by the Association for Contemplative Mind in Higher Education This year s theme focused on curriculum development The 70 participants representing various disciplines and agencies engage in inquiry writing reflection and discussion and are led by scholars and educators who are experts in contemplative education Skepticism While Zajonc says that over 10 000 people have attended such sessions across the country and currently there are around 150 NIH funded research projects on mindfulness many of these individuals in higher education still say they feel isolated from other colleagues He agrees that there is a certain amount of professional skepticism about CP As a scientist whom colleagues might describe as having unconventional ideas Zajonc points to Galileo whose fellow scientists would not look into his telescope to view Jupiter s four moons he had recently discovered Four moons they said could not be possible according to the prevalent cosmological theories of the day Like Galileo Zajonc invites his skeptics to look at the evidence at hand Although some will ignore the research that strongly suggests that mindfulness training is associated with many different kinds of benefits he is pleased that interest in CP continues to increase For example a very small circle of scholars and other leaders began to meet at Harvard s Graduate School of Education in 2007 to discuss contemplative dimensions of leadership This year fifty persons attended the various meetings which is evidence that scholarship and teaching in the field are growing An Active and Contemplative Life As more persons discover the value of mindful living they also realize they are not forced to choose between a contemplative or an active life as many in the ancient world had thought To live mindfully does not mean withdrawal from the world escape from reality or a disconnection from family friends or society Attending to modern day problems including issues relating to social justice is a critical element in contemporary contemplative life Justice also involves consideration of the needs of all sentient beings so that each can flourish in a sustainable environment Zajonc writes in Meditation as Contemplative Inquiry 2009 Paying attention setting a selfless resolve finding others and working through the obstacles to success are

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles/897-enlightenment (2015-06-03)
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  • Leadership Profiles
    the Action Persons of Purpose in the Profession Victor Kazanjian In the Heart of the Action Persons of Purpose in the Profession Larry Goldbaum In the Heart of the Action Persons of Purpose in the Profession Bonsall Harris and Barch Making a World of Difference Faculty Involvement in International Service The University of Louisville International Service Learning Program The VP Is In Vice Presidents Talk About Character Initiatives on Their

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles?start=10 (2015-06-03)
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  • Leadership Profiles
    Leadership Profiles Filter Title Filter In the Heart of the Action Persons of Purpose in the Profession K Harper In the Heart of the Action Persons of Purpose in the Profession A Heiselt Presidential Profile REBECCA CHOPP Colgate University Presidential Profile T K WETHERELL Florida State University Presidential Profile GORDON GEE Vanderbilt University President Profile LARRY SHINN Berea College Leadership Profile SCOTTY MCLENNAN Stanford University Leadership Profile ALAN WOLFE Boston

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles?start=20 (2015-06-03)
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  • Leadership Profiles
    Dalton ICSV Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook Leadership Profiles Filter Title Filter Presidential Profile ROBERT ODEN Carleton College Part II Presidential Profile ROBERT ODEN Carleton College Part I Presidential Profile ROBERT CAROTHERS University of Rhode Island Presidential Profile JOHN DIBIAGGIO Tufts University Part II Presidential Profile JOHN DIBIAGGIO Tufts University Part I Presidential Profile GRAHAM B SPANIER Pennsylvania State University Presidential Profile GREGORY PRINCE Hampshire College Letter from

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/leadership-profiles?start=30 (2015-06-03)
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  • Social Class on Campus
    chat It reasonably follows that that his broad approach to teaching and learning would inspire Dr Barratt to author a blog He characterizes the blogosphere as a new marketplace of ideas where the interesting and emergent things get posted Dr Barratt takes advantage of this format by sharing current varied content that need not align with the specific markets or messages that other media outlets consciously or unconsciously promote personal communication December 9 2014 Fundamentally the purpose of Social Class on Campus is to increase knowledge and awareness of about issues of class in higher education just as the author encourages his readers to do This blog originated as a means for soliciting feedback on Dr Barratt s class related manuscripts and has since evolved into a platform for inject ing interesting data or perspectives into the narrative about social class personal communication December 9 2014 With each post he seeks to provoke readers to think more or think differently about class The intended audience of this blog is as wide ranging as its contents Any reader would find value in the entries faculty members across disciplines student affairs professionals graduate or undergraduate students and non academics alike Even the header of the blog underscores the open nature of the audience by stating Comments and submissions are welcome if you have something to say about social class and social class in higher education Beyond the content generated by Dr Barratt and a few of his colleagues this blog also guides readers to many additional resources related to social class Most posts conclude with a long list of works cited within the entry Furthermore the right hand static margin identifies the most popular posts and highlights additional interesting resources including links to other blogs and a related non profit organization Class Action This blog stands out because of its emphasis on raising awareness of class issues for all students According to Dr Barratt current campus initiatives that focus on first generation and low income student support are important but draw from a deficit model of social class Instead by highlighting behaviors of a range of class backgrounds and challenging common misconceptions this blog seeks to spark conversation across difference Dr Barratt underscores the need for students in the social class majority to cultivate class consciousness in order to be prepared for success in a diverse workforce Code Switching Like all issues of diversity progress cannot be made if class related dialogue remains isolated to those in the minority Social Class on Campus contains several noteworthy strengths The earliest posts provide an accessible and insightful introduction to thinking about class then review and debunk common class related myths This content provides a useful foundation for individuals who are new to the subject or professionals who seek to educate students staff or faculty Secondly the entries are clearly written and presented in a scale that is easy to digest and simple to share with others For example 5 Things You Need to Know

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-book-reviews/1097-social-class-on-campus (2015-06-03)
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