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  • Character Clearinghouse
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    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&template=characterclearinghouse&link=5a2938ee6e970032a44899cdf18315d3f3382c38 (2015-06-03)
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  • The Red Flag Campaign
    key components of healthy relationships and abusive ones Data from initial focus groups with college students showed that students clearly understood and categorized physical forms of abuse but students required additional clarity around more insidious forms of violence such as emotional abuse coercive sexual relationships and isolating partners from family and friends As a result the campaign uses a bystander intervention model focusing its attention around peers and friends of victims and perpetrators of dating violence in a collegiate environment The campaign messaging encourages friends to say something and educates friends and peers about the red flags of dating violence Thus the campaign was named The Red Flag Campaign In 2006 The Red Flag Campaign introduced its message on ten Virginia campuses as a pilot program Of the ten campuses four received roughly 500 flags along with campaign posters to place in high traffic areas while the other six campuses received only posters Students were then surveyed in order to assess the significance of the impact the flags in combination with the posters made in comparison to campuses with posters only Out of 844 students surveyed on campuses with flags almost 430 students indicated they had heard of The Red Flag Campaign In contrast roughly 75 of the 282 students surveyed on campuses with only posters had not heard about the campaign This success prompted the full launch of the campaign in 2007 complete with posters flags and the Campus Planning Guide implementation toolkit on 18 Virginia campuses and has now grown to over 300 colleges universities and military installations in more than 45 states and into Canada Goals and Successes A unique eleme nt and goal of The Red Flag Campaign is utilizing the student voice to illustrate what warning signs sound like when spoken by a friend In efforts to achieve this goal the campaign implements posters of students representing different demographic populations that vary in race ethnicity and sexual orientation These posters serve as the face of The Red Flag Campaign and reflect authentic lived instances of students experiences and provide examples of language that college students can use when acting as an effective bystander McCord describes that through the student voice the campaign seeks to change social norms on college and university campuses Friends and peers are encouraged to step in when red flags of an abusive relationship appear and should no longer view abuse in relationships as a private matter McCord attributes the success of the campaign to the interdependence of student voice She finds that having student leadership within the launch programming and design implementation of the plan is what makes the campaign resonate so well with college students Additionally McCord states that campuses should use the bones of the campaign offered in the Campus Planning Guide and ask students to take the campaign and make it their own Future Leadership of The Red Flag Campaign envisions creating in person and online training tools for faculty and staff to help support messaging and promote

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-best-practices/1103-the-red-flag-campaign?tmpl=component&print=1&page= (2015-06-03)
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  • Character Clearinghouse
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    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&template=characterclearinghouse&link=531b70bde9918d058c056536e27f800b2f5be288 (2015-06-03)
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  • Men of Color in Higher Education: New Models for Success
    the United States Perpetuated in settler colonialism the modern history of Native Americans has been severely altered by European colonialism Chapter four is entitled Masculinity Through a Male Latino Lens written by Victor B Sáenz and Beth E Bukoski Following an extensive account of feminist theoretical frameworks including Chicana feminism Sáenz and Bukoski highlight the importance of analyses focused on the gender gap in Latin populations They also explore the educational and community based impact of patriarchy and masculinity that influence Latino male success in educational institutions The fifth and final chapter is entitled Re setting the Agenda for College Men of Color Lessons Learned from a 15 Year Movement to Improve Black Male Success The chapter written by Shaun Harper explores scholarly work produced over fifteen years that has centered on Black male students Harper questions why the greater attention on Black men has not yielded higher student success in their educational experiences He argues that new initiatives for men of color must be strategic and not implemented at the expense of women of color Though Harper s essay does mention the four minority groups it would have been useful to include a broader concluding essay that addresses action steps and frameworks for educators to who will use this book as a guide for practice On many campuses racial and ethnic minorities are included in the broad demarcation of students of color or multicultural students separate from the larger campus population Therefore it might have been useful include a few notes for practitioners who work with the broader students of color population However at the core of intersectionality race and ethnicity operate as intersecting oppressions and where race ethnicity and gender meet there are specific conditions that must be analyzed Such is the case in this text where there is a separation of identities into embodiments with unique circumstances Each chapter provides its own set of recommendations for best practices in higher education For example in Chapter 3 Bitsól and Lee suggest that administrators enter into dialogue with members of the Native American communities that send their children to the school so both know exactly what each can do for the students p 77 The specificity of this cultural remedy exemplifies why the structure of the text was necessary The volume is advantageous as a point of initiation into understanding the multifariousness of gendered and racialized experiences within the higher education setting Scholars and practitioners interested in developing and undertaking programs and practices have to be more intentional in their work Indeed Williams introduced new foundations in the subtitle providing an underlying directive that it is imperative that programs are sufficiently supportive of and attentive to the specific needs of men of color This is particularly important as they attempt to navigate a system that is often isolating at times psychosocially violent and rife with expectations and a persistent university structure designed for and largely still beneficial to white middle class heterosexual cis gendered men One of the messages

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-book-reviews/1105-men-of-color-in-higher-education-new-models-for-success?tmpl=component&print=1&page= (2015-06-03)
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  • Character Clearinghouse
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    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/component/mailto/?tmpl=component&template=characterclearinghouse&link=24badaa4d90fe014fe4ffb384fc2989b607ff18a (2015-06-03)
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  • Past Issues
    Awards Past Issues Institute Proceedings Archives Journal of College and Character Institute Live Blog Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook Past Dalton Issues Dalton Institute February 2013 Dalton Institute February 2012 Dalton Institute February 2011 Filter Title Filter June

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/issue-information (2015-06-03)
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  • Journals Relating to Character Development
    Jon C Dalton ICSV Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook Journal Relating to Character Development Journal of Moral Education In Character The Journal for Civic Commitment Journal of College and Character The Journal of Research in Character Education Michigan

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/resources/journals-relating-to-character-development (2015-06-03)
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  • Character Education Initiatives
    claim that widespread societal concern about ethics has led to many new educational and professional initiatives that constitute a return to ethics in the academy References Dalton J C Crosby P C 2010 How we teach character in college A retrospective on some recent higher education initiatives that promote moral and civic learning Journal of College Character 11 2 1 10 Kiss K Euben J P Eds 2010 Debating moral education Rethinking the role of the modern university Durham NC Duke University Press How we teach character in college A retrospective on some recent higher education initiatives that promote moral and civic learning Most colleges and universities are engaged in at least five types of educational activities or initiatives that are designed to influence the moral values and behaviors of college students The following five types of activities initiatives target different moral issues or concerns in college student beliefs and behaviors l Encouraging Civic Responsibility 2 Promoting Holistic Personal Development 3 Encouraging Intellectual Academic Values 4 Promoting Prosocial Attitudes Values 5 Combating Dangerous and Illicit Behaviors These institutional efforts have been rarely labeled as character development programs but often one of their implicit purposes has been to guide the personal

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/resources/character-education-initiatives (2015-06-03)
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