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  • Men of Color in Higher Education: New Foundations for Developing Models for Success
    endowed chair at University of California Los Angeles and Loni Pazich a PhD candidate in higher and post secondary education at New York University explore the flaws in most research on men of color in higher education specifically Asian men In particular the reduction of Asian populations to model minorities and how research often overlooks the numerous ethnic groups within that racial category essentially rendering them invisible or without needs or assistance Using the foundation of intersectionality they look at these differences and how they affect achievement and the kind of support needed for success despite stereotypes and assumptions that place Asian males as a population not in need of services The following chapter Ahistoricism in the Native American Experience was completed by LeManuel Lee Bitsoi and Lloyld Lee Bitsoi is an associate in the department of organismic and evolutionary biology at Harvard University Lee is an assistant professor of Native American studies at the University of New Mexico Bistsoi and Lee use this chapter to establish a foundation of understanding about Native American history in relation to their culture and the government They offer and explanation to why Native American men face challenges in traditional white university settings by recounting often disregarded history Finally using tribalCrit and Native feminism the authors offer suggestions of alternative ways to address and view what is seen by outsiders as a deficit in the Native American community In chapter 4 Masculinity Through a Latino Male Lens Victor Sáenz and Beth Bukoski PhD discuss the challenges Latino men face Similar to chapter one this chapter takes masculinity and interprets it through the concepts of Machismo and Familismo arguing that white heteronormative notions of masculinity in academia leave little room for men of color leading to competiveness or dropping out Sáenz an associate professor in educational administration at the university of Texas Austin and Buoski an assistant professor at University of Louisville build the foundation of their argument by explaining the framework of both the feminist and men s movement and how they are sometimes in opposition Using this historical context of men of color s relationship to patriarchy they suggest that men of color are not equipped with the social capital needed to succeed at institutions based in white masculinity and therefore tap into sometimes against their own interest pride and independence Most importantly they end by moving away from theorizing and examine a group of Latino males feedback using a Chicana feminist lens and provide suggestions for alternative ways to support these students beyond the scope of on campus programs The final chapter Re Setting The Agenda For The College Men Of Color Lessons Learned From A 15 Year Movement To Improve Black Male Student Success Shaun Harper Phd faculty in the Graduate School Of Education Gender Studies and Africana Studies at the University of Pennsylvania concludes this text by investigating similar themes to chapter four but focused on African American males Additionally he discusses the historical context of the black male crisis

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  • Women of Influence, Women of Vision: A Cross-Generational Study of Leaders and Social Change
    their male peers yet were still committed to women having equal access to education The next cohort referred to as the Instigators are vastly different from the Predecessors and represent a group of women in the 1960s and 1970s who challenged social structures and patriarchal systems through their work and research This group of women often referring to themselves as feminist blended their values and professional aspirations during a time of heightened social injustices and the rise of several equal rights movements In addition Instigators bonded with other women who had similar values and interest which led to a more collective approach to leadership since they were usually not they only female in their place of work like the Predecessors The third and most recent cohort is known as the Inheritors Astin and Leland 1991 describe this cohort as being the group most influenced by the cohort that came before them Inheritors often had the opportunity to study work and be inspired by Instigators They valued their friendships with other women and were committed to the work of the mentors who came before them and as such would use strength based approaches to their leadership strategies Focusing on leadership in the education sphere Women of Influence Women of Vision breaks down the seventy seven women leaders that where interviewed for the study in the aforementioned cohorts which allows the reader to see a clear connection between the historical context of the United States and the development of each cohort s leadership style Aside from societal and historical influences the authors also provide insight into other outside forces family role models etc that shape not only the involvement the women leaders had in leadership activities but also their commitment to social justice The first half of the book provides the reader with a clear understanding of the framework used for the study which was inspired by the 1983 Wingspread conference in Racine Wisconsin attended by authors Helen Austin a psychologist and professor of higher education at UCLA and Carole Leland a senior program associate for the Center for Creative Leadership in San Diego Moreover the first half of the book introduces the generational influences that formed and informed women leaders and their commitment to change and social justice The second half of the book utilizes the voice and experiences of the women to 1 Analyze the triggering events that led to the outcomes of their leadership efforts 2 Examine the dynamics of leadership and what strategies the women leaders took to create change 3 Describe how one maintained self care through the obstacles they faced and the cost leadership had on their lives 4 Review the accomplishments of the women leaders in the more recent cohort which are largely attributed to the contributions of the women in the early cohorts The book concludes with findings from the study and suggests implications for developing future cohorts of women leaders The authors even go so far as to include resource materials and the

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  • The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement
    errors and instead blame others Connecting Accomplishment With Effort and Persistence While much of the educational process is about learning from mistakes in order to develop and improve self absorption is an obstacle to such improvement Narcissists lack the motivation to improve because they believe they have already made it p 42 Such overconfidence can hinder performance and discourage real effort and persistence The culture of self admiration tells us to love ourselves unconditionally for what we are This is unfortunate because most personal change takes practice and time pp 284 285 Learning With Others Students with narcissistic tendencies most likely do not work well with their classmates Because they see themselves as superior to others they naturally see others as inferior and as a consequence treat others as inferior Making themselves look good is more important than working cooperatively with their peers in order for fellow group members to succeed or to contribute to a constructive learning environment The self is the primary source of value not the knowledge or skills that may be acquired through collaboration with others or the reward that comes with challenging assignments and supportive teamwork Social Networking While these three concerns are noted in the book and are not the only ones mentioned the authors particularly emphasize the second concern that is individuals not associating accomplishment and recognition with repeated effort and resilience A chapter is devoted to what the authors see as an increasingly powerful force against human persistence and hard work This is a force that has permeated society and helped to distort attitudes about one s self so that excessive self promotion is now perceived as normal behavior This force is the allure of attention and potential celebrity generated by social networks According to Twenge and Campbell narcissists thrive on social networking sites p 110 and social networking sites reinforce narcissists in an endless loop p 111 Promoting the self in order to create the image that one is popular and important by means of displaying pleasing photographs detailed descriptions of interests and activities and the largest number of Facebook type friends is fundamental to the structure and purpose of social media The authors report that college students who scored high on surveys measuring narcissistic behaviors were experts in focusing on their best qualities attracting and building a large collection of friends on their sites and more likely to interact with others who display similar behaviors p 111 The authors point to reasons for concluding that Internet sites such as these promote narcissism For one thing Facebook and blog authors are tempted to create distorted images of themselves because emphasizing only what they think are the most attractive elements of their personalities is easy to do The focus is often on superficial aspects which are conveyed in posts of their every move and thought The posts are justified they think because the reports broadcast aspects about themselves so they must be of great interest to others Often the superficial postings leave little room for subtle elements that characterize thoughtful face to face relationships In addition people who are desperate for attention have access to a huge potential audience on the Web via sites such as YouTube blogs newspaper comment boards and photo rating sties p 122 Anyone with a computer and an Internet connection can gain some amount of fame p 121 This new technology has done more than democratize entertainment it has given millions of people the opportunity to seek the attention and fame that they crave p 121 What Educators Should Do The following are suggestions that may be useful in helping young people temper tendencies to focus exclusively or mainly on themselves Learning How to Set Realistic Goals Teaching young people to set reasonable goals is an important educational task These goals should involve a certain degree of struggle and challenge that can help them build confidence in their abilities while also aiding them in awareness of their weaknesses and as a result help them to acquire humility Engaging in Activities That Help to Avoid Excessive Focus on Self Goals should include high level activities that motivate students to become so involved that they lose focus on themselves Such engagement often requires a connection between students and highly meaningful assignments Paradoxically a person can find an activity so interesting that she loses focus on her self This is the concept of flow Although the authors mention flow they do not go into detail about flow activities Csikszentmihaliyi 1993 indicates four characteristics that likely produce flow These activities have concrete goals and manageable rules make it possible to adjust opportunities for action to our capacities provide clear information about how well we are doing and screen out distractions and make concentration possible p xiv Learning to Concentrate Persons who have not been trained to discipline themselves to concentrate may be unusually distracted by thoughts centered on the self When their thoughts are disrupted their default button directs them to attend to details that relate to self Class activities that require students to concentrate for blocks of time on tasks may aid them in strengthening their attention abilities As more online classes are added to the college curriculum an important challenge for teachers and institutions is to create an online environment demanding that students devote their full attention to tasks for long periods of time Working Hard and Being Persistent Even in Failure in Order to Improve Learning how to fail is a valuable skill and is much more complicated and difficult than one might think Coping with failure in ways that improve performance is especially difficult for many students especially when they see other students succeed with less effort Yet students who do poorly should be encouraged to try again Constructive encouragement is one of the most fundamental and essential aspects of good teaching It is also one of the reasons why effective teaching is a key factor in combating what the authors describe as the narcissism epidemic Good

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  • Review of Christianity and Moral Identity in Higher Education by Perry L. Glanzer and Todd C. Ream
    The authors argue that higher education leaders and faculty should make choices about policies programs and curricula based on a deep appreciation of the rich and complex concept of human flourishing that would result in offering a wide scope of human approaches p 3 with moral identity being an essential aspect of helping to shape the human identity of students For Glanzer and Ream universities perpetuate moral identities already such as educating good citizens successful professionals or athletic competitors by doing the following things Telling narratives that inspire and shape views about ends Teaching skills or virtues acquired by habitation and refined through critical thinking and practice Transmitting rules general principles and wisdom Cultivation of the above by studying role models listening to mentors continual practice and communal participation in those things associated with the perfection of the functional identity Teaching the learner to think critically and independently about his or her performance in light of all of the above p 21 According to the authors universities can help to encourage a much richer cultivation of human identity by creating and supporting the establishment of smaller communities that reinforce character values Thus teaching ethical decision making should not be restricted to academic programs and practices These sorts of communities or initiatives are common in co curricular and student affairs programs and practices in secular universities but the crucial connection to a particular social identity and moral tradition is often lacking In light of this gap the authors propose an integration model that emphasizes the need for students to acquire the necessary critical thinking skills to analyze their own and other moral traditions on the basis of a particular moral orientation The educational institution can aid students intellectual development by providing the means for them to have a greater understanding and appreciation of their own particular moral beliefs traditions and practices as well as to obtain a basic grasp of other prevailing moral traditions Not to do so argue Glanzer and Ream is to stunt intellectual growth p 162 In the final portion of their book the authors speak directly to administrators faculty and others interested in Christian higher education They present ways that various Christian traditions can provide context to the moral orientation of Christian institutions and zero in on institutions they consider to exemplify these traditions based on their empirical study The purpose of their empirical study was to identify Christian colleges and universities that endorse specific kinds of moral knowledge and are committed in their programs policies practices curricula and co curricular to a particular vision of the good life p 132 Glanzer and Ream surveyed 156 Christian colleges and universities associated with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities and the Lilly Fellows programs The authors selected these institutions for their study because Lindholm et al 2005 and Sax et al 1999 indicated that the faculty of these institutions supported encouragement of moral education and Kuh 2002 indicated that these institutions had substantial success with moral education outcomes Out of the 156 schools 64 were noted in Colleges that Encourage Character Development Templeton 1999 Glanzer and Ream identified five means for determining that educational institutions significantly value moral education in their practices and promotion clear moral mission the prevalence of appeals to moral ideals in marketing the school the integration of ethics into the curricular realm the integration of ethical ideals and language into the co curricular realm and an integration of efforts being made in the curricular and co curricular realms p 133 Based on information they gathered from examining such resources as academic catalogs admissions materials and student handbooks they selected nine schools out of the 156 that they concluded most indicated an inclusive attentiveness to moral education Bethel University in Minnesota Calvin College Eastern Mennonite University George Fox University St Olaf College Seattle Pacific University University of Dallas the University of St Thomas in Minnesota and Xavier University in Ohio p 133 Following this identification of the nine institutions the authors visited each school to interview site leaders who could explain in more specific ways that their institutions were committed to students moral development The leaders typically included the chief academic officer and student development officer as well as the officers in charge of general education residence life student discipline and religious life Based on the information they gathered from their studies the authors provide suggestions for ways by which Christian colleges and universities can improve their moral mission programs practices and curricula These suggestions are closely tied to the formation of the identity of the whole person and is the central focus in the Christian concept of the fall and redemption of human beings Thus the institution the student and human identity are bound together in the meta narrative of the Christian story that the authors argue should pervade all aspects of the Christian campus setting Glanzer and Ream challenge institutions and organizations to prove that their primary focus is on the moral development of students The authors five sources of evidence indicating that colleges and universities take moral education seriously p 133 as noted above provide a proposed starting point for schools to create specific goals and indicators to guide them in this mission These criteria also offer a basis for researchers parents students and others interested in students moral development to compare and contrast institutional efforts to promote moral education practices Readers interested in specific programs and practices in moral education can learn more about such initiatives by reading the section on the nine schools selected for in depth study The historical account of moral education in colleges and universities in the first sections of the book is a good beginning source for students faculty and administrators to use for tracing the shift of institutional roles of those responsible for students moral education This shift from faculty and administrators to student affairs leaders parallels the emerging profession of student development in higher education The authors take to task contemporary research in

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  • Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim, the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation By Eboo Patel
    in his words more radical than the Marxist intellectuals I knew more gentle than the social service types I volunteered with more intelligent that the professors who taught my classes and more effective than the activists I protested with p 52 Building an Interfaith Movement After graduation Patel turned his attention to teaching students at an alternative school in northwest Chicago Despite the pervasive gang violence in their lives many of his students experienced success as a result of his determination to teach them skills they needed while recognizing and helping them to overcome the obstacles they faced Yet he confessed that he was undergoing a lonely existence because he missed being part of a community of searchers like himself p 65 It is at the point in the book that two important projects in Patel s life are brought into clearer focus his search for a personal identity and the early formation of a groundbreaking grassroots interfaith youth movement His desire to share his experiences and ideas with those who had similar social justice goals led him to form a cooperative of activists who lived together in Chicago and pooled their resources A Catholic monk Brother Wayne invited Patel and a Jewish friend to speak at interfaith events where persons of diverse religious backgrounds came together to share their perspectives and seek common ground However Patel and his friend found that young people rarely attended the meetings where they spoke They were disappointed that the occasions were long and boring with no social action initiatives to energize and unite the participants Attending the United Religious Initiative URI Global Summit at Stanford University however proved to be an entirely different experience and helped to clarify his vision to create a project where religiously diverse young people come together for one year in a residential community where they would live together and take part in community service projects p 73 The vision materialized into the Interfaith Youth Corps soon to be the Interfaith Youth Core IFYC where three pillars of practice comprised the core of the movement intercultural encounter social action and interfaith reflection Following the summit 16 young adults representing four continents and six religions met in the Bay area to discuss the basic principles of the burgeoning IFYC movement For examples to follow Patel directed his attention to three exemplar movements Catholic Worker service learning and multiculturalism while incorporating the advice of URI conference facilitator Anastasia White articulate the core idea clearly develop a spread strategy and then identify and network the best people doing the work p 115 By June 2002 with an Oxford degree in hand and an eye toward expanding the movement to which fellow activist Jeff Pinzino had laid the groundwork Patel pursued the advice of Chicago s experienced social action leaders and thinkers The harsh reality of having to raise money was his greatest frustration Business and other community leaders were reluctant to support a religious rather than a secular cause and religious leaders were inclined to promote only their own faith because they lamented they had little time to reach their own young people and it was not a high enough priority to spend that precious time exposing them to others p 164 People were frightened Patel observed that mass conversions would occur as a result of youth s exposure to other religions p 160 Others feared that the goal of IFYC was to teach young people that all religions were basically the same To counteract those problems the aim of the IFYC model was to maintain faith identity in a religiously plural world p 166 How could this happen without one person trying to convince the other that his or her religion is the only right one To avoid these mutually exclusive discussions p 166 the IFYC model was designed to be a pluralistic one preserving the individuality of religious faith while learning from and sharing with other participants Young people from different faith communities would share how common values in diverse faith communities such as hospitality cooperation compassion mercy p 166 would be uniquely treated in their distinctive religions The IFYC model was also designed to incorporate a service learning approach not only were young adults to discuss how their religion would speak to a particular religious value but they would also bring action and faith together with their involvement in a service project that would incorporate that value These projects could be for example helping to build a house for an unfortunate family or tutoring refugee children Roots The meaning of the title of Patel s book Acts of Faith can be interpreted as underscoring the union of a profound journey and exploration of faith with the powerful expression of social action However the title Acts of Faith can also denote as Patel clearly conveys to his readers an obsessive devotion to faith by means of brutal acts Patel s chapter on youth programs argues that two kinds of organization can provide young people with a sense of groundedness and connection along with purpose and meaning one that is altruistic and pluralistic and the other a destructive and totalitarian one Every time we read about a young person who kills in the name of God we should recognize that an institution painstakingly recruited and trained that young person And that institution is doing the same for thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of others like him In other words those religious extremists have invested in their youth programs p 149 It is his own personal faith journey as a youth so intertwined with the development of the IFYC and which is a symbol of others religious treks that must be emphasized as the foundation of the interfaith movement he helped to establish Patel s yearning for a religious identity symbolizes how crucial it is for any society to invest its resources and efforts in youth programs and education so that young people can pursue their own faith journeys For example while

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  • Review of The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal by Parker J. Palmer
    his critics For example one criticism is the alleged lack of a coherent theoretical foundation instead some argue integrative education is a grab bag of techniques and an assortment of pedagogies p 23 In reply to this criticism Palmer and Zajonc present what they identify as a philosophy of integrative education based on ideas of philosophers such as process thinkers James and Whitehead and discoveries by new science pioneers such as Einstein and Bohrs The unifying element of integrative education they underscore throughout the book is the lived human experiences of complex interrelations including cognitive emotional physical spiritual and social which significantly influence thought learning behavior values and so on A philosophy of integrative education therefore is about the interconnectedness of reality and its multiple dimensions which includes different types of knowing contemplative aesthetic and moral as well as the ethical dimensions of our way of knowing p 122 Two other criticisms of integrative education Palmer mentions are that a its implementation is messy and b involves emotions which some say have no place in the classroom Palmer argues that order and rationality give us direction and grounding However placing too much value on order simply because we fear what we cannot completely control can lead to what he calls a purity obsession p 37 This obsession with order forces teachers and administrators to rely on a top down approach which allows for little spontaneity and exploration and discounts the importance of many types of relevant knowledge such as relational bodily institutive and emotional p 36 To those educators who maintain that they are not qualified to handle the problems that accompany emotional situations Palmer says emotional connections to learning are unavoidable Denying these connections is ignoring crucial pedagogical research p 42 As an educator I would like to learn more about how to deal with these emotions for example some teachers express concern about students emotipnal reactions they observe in and out of the classroom but feel powerless to help them Welch 2010 For those who seek practical examples of integrative education Zajonc offers stories from his experiences as a professor as well as those from other colleagues Palmer provides a chapter on strategies that he has found work well in creating a context and method for effective conversations and about which he writes extensively elsewere Palmer 2004 In the appendices readers can read about programs and practices that incorporate the principles of integrative education through the stories of professors administrators and others The sections are titled In the Classroom Beyond the Classroom and Administrative and Campuswide Initiatives For example Jon C Dalton former vice president of student affairs at The Florida State University describes his once regular practice of being there at his The VP Is In table during weekly Market Day a popular flea market at the Student Union Plaza This ritual helped to foster the type of conversations that Palmer and Zajonc advocate while creating among students and student affairs administrators as well as others a

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  • Review of Books by Baxter Magolda, Part I
    and social commitments learning is also a shared experience mutually constructed with others Preface p xviii Individuals interpret the world through an individual consciousness but they are related to others for survival knowledge construction and evaluation and support Thus mutual autonomy and dependence equal interdependence LPM directs faculty and student affairs leaders to provide conditions for learners to engage in challenging problem solving and creative tasks while these leaders also offer learners support so that they will have confidence and tools to meet these challenges These two aspects make up the learning partnership between learners and educators LPM centers on three dimensions of development epistemological intrapersonal and interpersonal p 8 The epistemological dimension concerns the ways that individuals make claims to knowledge based on their basic assumptions and views about nature and reality Intrapersonal refers to ways persons view and construct their identities Interpersonal focuses on ways persons view and create relationships Self and Others Although the term construction is used often when the authors refer to knowledge and reality they point to stubborn facts of the world that stand as challenges with which we must deal that is self authors must construct knowledge and act within a limited context life is not a blank slate upon which one writes one s life story with oneself as sole character Furthermore while self authorship might seeem to connote isolation and radical independence the authors in Learning Partnerships emphasize that knowledge is mutually constructed with others with whom we experience the world In fact we can only be responsible citizens if we are independent thinkers with the confidence to trust our inner voice in order to lead and serve others in times of conflict and challenge Creating an internal voice involves cultivating the ability to pay attention to the thoughts beliefs and values that one holds dear while examining them closely in light of past and new experiences Preface LP p xxii The internal voice although viewed as foundational is always growing and changing and is open to novel possibilities Its resilience helps to offset desires to win others approval yet at the same time it provides the person enough confidence to take into serious account what others hold dear without fearing that one s own values will be compromised One constructs one s inner voice by considering others needs and values in addition to one s own in an ongoing process of growth As a result individuals can contribute to the common good by being able to value mutual multiple perspectives and needs Students voices from interviews presented in various studies chapters of the book illustrate the powerful influence of simultaneously encountering one s self and others in profound ways For example in An Urban Leadership Internship Program Egart Healy Student Raymond recalls that his experiences influenced his decision to serve others in situations where he can be on the front lines in life p 145 Jessica relates that her intense experiences with self and others helped to bring about a

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  • Review of The Heart of Higher Education By Palmer and Zajonc
    example one criticism is the alleged lack of a coherent theoretical foundation instead some argue integrative education is a grab bag of techniques and an assortment of pedagogies p 23 In reply to this criticism Palmer and Zajonc present what they identify as a philosophy of integrative education based on ideas of philosophers such as process thinkers James and Whitehead and discoveries by new science pioneers such as Einstein and Bohrs The unifying element of integrative education they underscore throughout the book is the lived human experiences of complex interrelations including cognitive emotional physical spiritual and social which significantly influence thought learning behavior values and so on A philosophy of integrative education therefore is about the interconnectedness of reality and its multiple dimensions which includes different types of knowing contemplative aesthetic and moral as well as the ethical dimensions of our way of knowing p 122 Two other criticisms of integrative education Palmer mentions are that a its implementation is messy and b involves emotions which some say have no place in the classroom Palmer argues that order and rationality give us direction and grounding However placing too much value on order simply because we fear what we cannot completely control can lead to what he calls a purity obsession p 37 This obsession with order forces teachers and administrators to rely on a top down approach which allows for little spontaneity and exploration and discounts the importance of many types of relevant knowledge such as relational bodily institutive and emotional p 36 To those educators who maintain that they are not qualified to handle the problems that accompany emotional situations Palmer says emotional connections to learning are unavoidable Denying these connections is ignoring crucial pedagogical research p 42 As an educator I would like to learn more about how to deal with these emotions for example some teachers express concern about students emotipnal reactions they observe in and out of the classroom but feel powerless to help them Welch 2010 For those who seek practical examples of integrative education Zajonc offers stories from his experiences as a professor as well as those from other colleagues Palmer provides a chapter on strategies that he has found work well in creating a context and method for effective conversations and about which he writes extensively elsewere Palmer 2004 In the appendices readers can read about programs and practices that incorporate the principles of integrative education through the stories of professors administrators and others The sections are titled In the Classroom Beyond the Classroom and Administrative and Campuswide Initiatives For example Jon C Dalton former vice president of student affairs at The Florida State University describes his once regular practice of being there at his The VP Is In table during weekly Market Day a popular flea market at the Student Union Plaza This ritual helped to foster the type of conversations that Palmer and Zajonc advocate while creating among students and student affairs administrators as well as others a closer campus community

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