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  • CC Book Reviews
    Studies Jon C Dalton ICSV Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook CC Book Reviews Filter Title Filter Spirituality and Campus Life A New Book for College Administrators Out on Fraternity Row Personal Accounts of Being Gay in College Big

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  • A Woman's Place is on the Campus: US Women's Progessive Colleges in the 1930s—Part 2
    to each other and all concerned in any adequate functioning of the person p 112 In order to put such curricula in place the faculty adviser was the primary feature of academic planning so that the college can bring about the greatest possible development of each student McHale 1936 p 114 An adviser met often with each student to aide her in selection of content to act as a clearing house on her problems and to guide her in correlating different fields of interest and study p 114 Students were not required to choose a major course of study Heinlein 1936 p 117 At the beginning of a student s educational journey however she made specific choices concerning her own curriculum which was to serve as a foundation of the her self directed learning Thus her studies were not imposed by organizational or logical structure of the subject matter or instructional or college resources but by her needs relating to interests personality present development and the society in which she lived Doerschuk p 113 Such selection of content methods and activities implied broadly defined and interrelated fields of study within which specific programs of work can be arranged for individual students p 113 Students conferred with faculty members representing three primary fields of study art science and literature At the close of two weeks of conferences with as many as seventy faculty or staff members the student was expected to become more aware of what her interests and abilities were Heinlein 1936 p 117 The student as an individual was well aware of the importance of her connection with the community of which she was a part In accepting the student as the unity and point of reference in an educational enterprise the progressive college recognizes that each person is fundamentally group formed a group member and individual within a community and is therefore concerned that the conditions of the community shall be such as will be conducive to the development of good individuals Doerschuk p 114 An example of a student s work record is shown in President Constance Warren s book A New Design for Women s Education 1940 A work record included a report of each project in which a student was involved Approximately fifty projects were recorded for this particular student whose primary interest was Native American culture In her freshman year she studied Introduction to Psychology by completing a general survey of Hopi culture showing the effect of culture and customs of the Hopi on his personality and Descriptions of various phases of Indian life including religion fetes and arts showing how the white man has changed the Hopi p 110 The student completed fifteen other projects that year including those categorized under the headings of biology mathematics and applied art In applied art the student built a small primitive loom p 113 Later she integrated two fields of study Bible and primitive arts to produce research on the religion of the Pueblo Indians One

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  • A Woman's Place is on the Campus: US Women's Progessive Colleges in the 1930s—Part I
    women s institutions participation in student forums political clubs and student branches of national organizations contributed to students awareness and understanding of world events Kathryn McHale director of the American Association of University Women wrote in 1935 that young women were becoming more acutely aware of the importance of their participation in a democratic society seeing themselves as contributing individuals with unique talents interests and abilities McHale argued that women in the new decade were being forced by the crowding impact of events to feel a greater responsibility for taking part in community national and international affairs and for understanding economic and social forces 1935 p 459 According to McHale the 1930 census figures showed that profitable employment of women was up 50 1 percent from 1920 an increase of 60 percent of those employed were married p 459 Women were beginning to move from slight participation in public affairs to greater involvement in industry service organizations education and government Increasingly women s institutions saw their role as preparing women to live in the modern world by promoting experiments and changes in college education which are almost revolutionary p 460 McHale explained that curricula in many leading women s colleges and coeducational colleges reflected the recognition that education must be an individual matter and that the college should not only consider the differences in abilities and interests of the individual but should capitalize on these very differences through a flexible program fitted to the students needs Social Responsibility Inspiring a sense of social responsibility was an important goal for many women s colleges for example McHale wrote that learning to live with other people is a crucial part of college life Educated people should not be aloof but should be dynamic members of society functioning as they give and receive and use ideas p 463 Students in several colleges participated in projects that enabled them to work closely with people in their communities Bennington was an example of a progressive institution where students took leave from college for two months to help alleviate social problems in their locales p 461 Mount Holyhoke women had opportunities to investigate the influence of work relief programs p 466 At Mills college students could major in The American Community which was designed to prepared students for civic engagement p 465 Residential life was beginning to be an important aspect of the curriculum Scripps College in California for example designed its residence halls in ways that would help to intersect students residential and academic life At Vassar three faculty members lived in each resident hall whose function was to develop nformal and helpful student teacher contacts to gather material on the intellectual interests and probable success of Freshmen and to advise students p 465 Intellectual Standards Contrasting the American to the German university McHale noted that US students were more prepared in ways to address contemporary problems than their German counterparts p 468 However McHale emphasized that the highest intellectual standards should always be demanded

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  • A Position Statement from The Initiative for Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education
    laws and of an objective reality It only allows room for this kind of knowing This orientation rewards doing rather than being One way knowledge transfer is the mode rather than two way collaborative search for meaning understanding and community In contrast to this dominant orientation we believe that our most important contributions to our students our institutions our communities and our nation flow more from who we are and how we live than from what we know and preach Professional and Student Relationships In our experience the growing gap between our ideals and realities our espoused values and values in use and our conflicting paradigms weakens relationships among faculty between faculty members and administrators and between us all and our students The academy offers few safe and supportive environments where professionals can share and explore the deeper meanings of their lives with each other and with their students Professional roles and the dominant rewards do not value such reflection We are reminded of Boyerâ s findings in his 1987 land mark study of U S colleges which seem even more pertinent today than then Scrambling for students and driven by marketplace demands many undergraduate colleges â are confused about their mission and how to impart the shared values on which the vitality of both higher education and society dependsâ Is it too much to expect that even in this hard edged competitive age a college graduate will live with integrity civility â even compassion We believe that by concerted individual and collective efforts we can overcome the obstacles to creating caring and reflective colleges and universities Obstacles We recognize tough obstacles which make it difficult to address these problems with the sustained attention they require Institutional structural limitations and reward systems are bedrock issues There is little financial support for developing alternative approaches Discretionary time energy and emotion which need to be invested over extended time periods is scarce and not rewarded The prevailing cultural mindset works against open sharing and exploration In addition it is difficult to frame our malaise in ways that resonate with the diverse professionals working in our colleges and universities Framing Our Malaise For five years we have tried to find simple clear tight language to describe the concerns which draw us together to create this Initiative For some the decline in our sense of purpose and meaning describes our underlying concern For others difficulty in sustaining authenticity and a sense of personal identity puts it better And for another significant group the language of spirit of spirituality of spiritual growth which provokes dead silence and frowns in many contexts captures the essence Yet when we do workshops at professional meetings and create a safe space for open conversations about this malaise persons across many personal and professional backgrounds understand and resonate with our concern The Prevailing Mindset The exclusive emphasis on rational empiricism conceptions of truth as objective and external and of knowledge as a commodity de legitimizes active public discussion of issues

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  • Spirituality Comes to College
    their condemnation of Galileo and positivism by apologizing for its actions in the case This conflict vividly portrays the centuries old separation between the Western paradigm of empirical positivistic objective valueâ free knowledge so cherished in traditional academia and the spiritual issues of faith hope and love Palmer 1993 considered the antithesis of scientific thinking While perhaps not as in open conflict as the past this dichotomization of world views science versus spirituality continues to pervade American society and culture The separation of church and state and of public and private higher education are based in part on this dichotomy And it is a dichotomy that has served us well The focus on verifiable truth spurred the Industrial Revolution and has contributed much to the quality of life throughout the world The ability to produce large quantities of food and the many other conveniences products and services that we take for granted e g electricity computing transportation medicine owe their existence to the principles of science underlying modernity However not surprisingly modernity was not without its flaws or critics The pursuit of knowledge outside of the boundaries and influence of values ethics and morality also led to questionable uses of inventions and discoveries e g nuclear weapons and to outright abuses and atrocities e g the Tuskegee Syphilis Study perpetrated in the name of science Throughout this century and especially accelerating after World War II the modern era has come under attack as its flaws and limitations have become evident and it has been accepted that during the last several decades society entered a postmodern era This breakdown was fueled by many sources not the least of which were the limits of knowing discovered by physicists perhaps the hardest of the hard sciences and the atrocities of World War II Postmodernism therefore is a reaction against the rationalism scientism and objectivity of modernism Its purpose is to induce skepticism of universal truths Postmodernism rejects the assumption that through reason we will be able to achieve agreement about the nature of truth With the emergence of postmodernism the hegemony of modernism and its counterparts positivism empiricism and universal generalizable truth has been ruptured Postmodernism rather than trying to replace one set of truths with another instead encourages multiple voices and multiple perspectives It is clear that academe is moving increasingly toward this postmodern perspective a perspective in which values assumptions and beliefs play a central role in the social sciences Tierney Rhoads 1993 There are those who complain that postmodernism falls into nihilism that if there is no single truth there must be no truth at all Others complain that postmodernism eliminates epistemological and ethical foundationsâ that there are no common understandings upon which communities can be built To me these criticisms miss the point Postmodernism does not hold that decisions on epistemological and ethical issues are not valuable or that they are useless Instead it challenges the notion that these foundations can be externally imposed In a way it removes

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  • Differentiating Spirituality from Religion
    are issues of religion Other areas of apparent overlap actually differ in character One such area is the issue of action Both definitions have a focus in activity However in religion the action is embodied in rituals prayers and exercises whereas each of the descriptors of spirituality includes words that connote action and movement including process transcending developing deriving and exploring Closely related to action is the static dynamic aspect of the two concepts Sharon Parks is the author of Big Questions Worthy Dreams Mentoring Young Adults in their Search for Meaning Purpose and Faith 2000 and she like James Fowler before her speaks of faith development as the central aspect of spiritual development Of course faith is another word with multiple meanings especially in the context of religion Parks recognizes that faith can be a negatively charged word and this differentiates the notion of faith from belief While faith development is a dynamic and active process of meaning making that undergoes transformation across an individual s life span a belief is more static and is accepted as true resulting in a condition where the holder is free from doubt In the context of this discussion spirituality is the dynamic process of faith development whereas religion provides adherents with beliefs Parks argues that at its core faith or spirituality is a process of meaning making which is the process of making sense out of the activities of life seeking patterns order coherence and relation between and among the disparate elements of human living It is the process of discovering and creating connections among experiences and events That is faith is trying to make sense of the big picture trying to find an overall sense of meaning and purpose in one s life Additionally both definitions make reference to external and internal dimensions However religion begins as and is for the most part an external phenomenon Its primary concern is external to the visible world it is centered on the existence of a supreme being or eternal principle and includes an agreed upon set of beliefs and practices that are external to the individual Religion can exist separate and apart from the individual not so for spirituality Spirituality begins and is perpetually an internal process though there is the moving outward from oneself through self transcendence connectedness to self and others and relationship with that which lies beyond the known and knowable world In a way the inner world expands to include the outer world Parks views spirituality to be more of a personal rather than a public search for meaning transcendence wholeness purpose and apprehension of spirit or Spirit as the animating essence at the core of life She describes spirituality as both immanent within the individual and transcendent beyond the individual That is in the experience and activity of faith it both lies beyond the range of ordinary perception and experience and thus is ultimately unknowable and it remains within us and the particulars of our experience Beyond the

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  • College and University Foodbank Alliance
    Students Really Food Insecure Because food insecurity poses threats to student success CUFBA provides support for these students What is the College and University Food Bank Alliance The College and University Food Bank Alliance envisions alleviating the barriers and challenges associated with food insecurity and hunger so that college and university students can remain in school and ultimately earn their degrees The College and University Food Bank Alliance strives to achieve one of its goals of supporting upcoming and existing food banks on college campuses Goals The Alliance is a digital community connecting individuals across the country on college campuses with the mission of alleviating food insecurity hunger and poverty among students of higher education Through the CUFBA website the alliance works to provide support training and other resources for student serving campus food banks and pantries CUFBA asks little of its members except that as you become able to teach and to share that you do so Why join CUFBA History CUFBA was co founded by Clare Cady Director of the Human Services Resource Center at Oregon State University and Nate Smith Director of the Michigan State University Student Food Bank Clare and Nate individually sought out colleagues involved with food banks on their respective campuses and through networking used one another s resources to develop the College and University Food Bank Alliance Clare Cady describes her initial efforts of finding individuals who understood working with food banks on college campuses Because the work I do is unique and there are very few people who do it having colleagues who understood the work that I did doesn t happen much I was really hoping to just find other people Nobody on my campus was doing this type of work so I thought there must have been others on other campuses doing the work I knew there were other campus food pantries so I began calling folks and collecting information I came across another person who was doing the exact same thing at Michigan State University Nate Smith He and I started chatting He had some funding and I had person power So we put those together and started the Alliance With funding and the personnel available the Alliance originated with two universities and grew to over 100 universities across the nation Our Members How to join CUFBA seeks individuals on campuses of higher education engaged in work surrounding food insecurity as well as seek individuals who wish to develop a food bank or work with an existing program Members of the alliance experience networking opportunities review institutional best practices for food banks and programming innovations as well as learn about educational enriching opportunities involving food insecurities and college campus food banks The Alliance continues expanding each day with outreach and educational opportunities such as webinars drive ins and social media initiatives For more information on how to join please visit the CUFBA website About and Join page Reference Cady C L 2014 Food Insecurity as a Student Issue Journal

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  • Campus Compact
    more would join if provided with the right tools encouragement and supporting structures Who We Are Here and Now Today thir ty four state affiliates and one national office in Boston support the work of over 1 100 member colleges Campus Compact has a wide variety of initiatives and resources that assist students faculty and staff in understanding and fostering the interception between academics and community service One of their most popular resources is a database of syllabi from every discipline that incorporates extra curricular activities The idea is that the more students leave campus the more they will be able to have a wider perspective and become well rounded citizens Another useful resource published by Campus Compact is Making College Happen This guide aims to increase the number and diversity of entering students especially first generation and minority students Meanwhile Campus Compact s Connect2Complete C2C is a program that uses peer mentoring and service learning to support the most vulnerable students in achieving academic success and civic engagement Another very valuable Campus Compact resource is Creating a Culture of Assessment It is an annual survey that measures campus based civic engagement across Campus Compact s members It offers insight into how campuses can make the most of the survey s processes and results to guide their own work Accomplishments I know of no other educational organization that has a track record like Campus Compact s over the past 20 years It is a phenomenal success not just in terms of growth in numbers but in terms of the impact it s had on communities on campuses and on individual lives Frank Rhodes Former President of Cornell University What people are saying about Campus Compact Campus Compact accomplishments are numerous and wide ranging they tell a story of continuing growth in support structures for campus engagement leading to notable levels of engagement with students faculty and community partners For instance 98 of Campus Compact member campuses have at least one community partnership and 9 out of 10 include service or civic engagement in their mission statements In 2012 campuses offered an average of 66 service learning courses per campus 64 in 2010 68 of campuses rewarded faculty for service learning and community based research 42 in 2008 and 64 in 2010 and 62 required service learning as part of the core curriculum of at least one major 51 in 2010 Campus Compact also assists its alumni Support for alumni entering public service includes informational programs on public service careers offered by 83 of campuses 41 in 2010 networking channels offered by 58 23 in 2010 and student loan deferment or forgiveness offered by 17 and 14 of campuses respectively 9 and 6 in 2010 Student participation in serv ice continues to increase at Campus Compact member colleges and universities even as the Corporation for National and Community Service and other federal sources report an overall decline Campus Compact s increase demonstrates that community service mechanisms produce a deep commitment to

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