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  • D. Abbott Turner Program in Ethics and Servant Leadership Summer Internship
    says nothing about the program s goals and methods Preeminently the Servant Leader Summer Internship Program at the Emory University Center for Ethics is grounded on a particular model of education It is built on a view of education that focuses on the formation of the individual and emphasizes the role that responsibility plays in one s life as a human being as a professional and as a citizen It is as immodest as this may sound a school for a human life It confronts the students directly with the following question what kind of person ought you to be Education as formation is not about training it is about the shaping and developing of a human being It involves teaching mentoring and expectations It states that there are some ways of being in the world that are preferable to better than higher than other ways of being in the world It first of all has a doctrine of human being that is not merely instrumental but that is normative It pushes against the cultural norms that structure human value around money It proclaims that a person s worth is not co extensive with how much money she or he has or gets A person s value to the world is in how she comports herself it is in what she does and how she does it It rests in her interactions with others particularly those who cannot provide her with any benefits The Servant Leader Summer Internship Program like all the EASL programs is about building character It strives to shape individuals who have the courage to recognize that most of human life involves acting out of imperfect information with imperfect options and the courage to re evaluate their commitments in the light of new knowledge and to change appropriately It is about shaping and forming ethical individuals who are committed to doing the right thing who have the tools to effect it and also have the epistemic humility to acknowledge that their judgments could be flawed To build character means that we have to help students to begin to construct their lives and do so in the context of their professional lives It starts with the assumption that human beings are projects in process and that they can exercise agency in that process To exercise this agency however requires both an awareness of and reflection upon what one does and why Additionally one can learn a great deal through one s observation and reflection on others behaviors and practices Other people are sources of moral education they are texts of moral literature if we simply observe and reflect on them This is why so much of the programming focuses on reflection On pushing probing and questioning When a student critiques or questions a colleague s or supervisor s actions the first question to ask them is why What was wrong Why do you disagree These questions are followed by others What would you do or say differently And

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/readings/com-phocapdf-plugins/cc-best-practices/1041-summer-internship-emory (2015-06-03)
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  • D. Abbott Turner Program in Ethics and Servant Leadership, Emory University Highlight
    from our special CC Highlight of Emory s EASL program FACULTY DIRECTOR Edward Queen Edward Queen may be a professor of religion a center director a director of research a director of undergraduate programming and a public intellectual with a law degree but he still has time to challenge his students to think deeply about the complexities and responsibilities of living an ethical life that is directed toward the common good He shares his ideas about the purpose of education as the formation of a person an outlook he describes as an old fashioned view of education He maintains that just as cultural activities on campus are as important as coursework for the education of students so too are appropriately structured engagements with socio political realities with human pain and suffering with our shared lives together as human beings PROGRAMS Summer Internship The Servant Leader Summer Internship Program is made up of 25 to 30 undergraduate graduate and professional students who work in Atlanta area nonprofits governmental agencies and socially responsible businesses Students engage in weekly class time which includes reflection on successes and challenges and examination of lessons learned from their weekly field experiences The Forum The Ethics and Servant Leadership EASL Forum is a weekly interdisciplinary forum focused on service community building and leadership and character development The Forum brings together 15 undergraduate and graduate students selected through an application process in a year long collaborative learning experience that includes retreats skill building sessions outside speakers and student developed projects CURRENT AND FORMER STUDENTS Mariangela Mihai M ariangela Mihai a graduate of Emory and former participant in the EASL Forum and Summer Internship programs describes herself is as a daughter of a political refugee scholar human rights activist and artist She is studying anthropology at Cornell where she

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  • D. Abbott Turner Program in Ethics and Servant Leadership Forum
    weekly forum meetings In four groups the students design and implement service and educational projects These projects allow the students to grapple on a deeper level many of the questions raised inside of the forum Students present their projects to the larger group at the end of the forum Examples of previous projects include the following GA Justice Project This group explored the challenges ex felons face both in Georgia and nationally through a variety of educational mediums including documentaries a book related to the topic i e The New Jim Crow 2010 a visit to a support group for ex felons in Decatur and then through a service learning opportunity at Georgia Justice Project The Alif Institute The Alif Institute was established in 2004 by the Arab American Fund of Georgia Inc Atlanta Georgia Its mission is to foster understanding and appreciation of Arab culture as well as to forge human connections through the power of arts culture This group made art with children ages 4 12 who attend Arabic classes at the Alif for three hours over a two week timespan They asked the youth to consider attributes of a good person and then had them decorate cards with those attributes written in Arabic They also involved the parents who assisted in teaching concepts and ethical values to the children Many parents expressed that they were very glad that someone was introducing these ideas to their children especially at such a young age Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture Inc TLW is a 501 c 3 non profit organization based in Atlanta TLW uses quality local food production to connect people to their food and the land creating better communities through education economic development and environmental improvement Students volunteered at Visit Truly Living Well Garden or Wheat St Garden in Old Fourth Ward studied the Farm Bill interviewed leaders from the Emory Sustainable Food Initiative and engaged with community through health education classes Relation to Character Development Amidst declining civic involvement and growing cynicism toward public institutions universities must take seriously their role in cultivating and forming tomorrow s leaders Inherent in this work is the need to develop in those future leaders the required intellectual rigor ethical awareness character development and concern for the common good The Forum helps cultivate future leaders by operating through a model of servant leadership Servant leadership rejects a view of leadership that is about the self aggrandizement of the individual with positional authority It maintains that true leaders are those attuned to working in partnership with individuals and the communities in which they live in order to improve human thriving To advance its mission the EASL program advocates increased attention throughout Emory University to ethics and leadership studies theory practice learning community based research and volunteerism Whether in non profits businesses politics religion law or medicine EASL strives to animate encourage advance and support Emory s citizen scholars as they develop the power to serve and lead for the

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  • Achieving Meaning, Purpose, and Authenticity: A Glimpse into the FSU Spiritual Life Project
    Astin Coburn and her staff initiated a Student Spirituality Brown Bag Series in 2007 After several years of the brown bag discussions Kidwell alongside Bill Moeller and Tamara Bertrand Jones began to develop a mission statement Instrumental in the development was Jon C Dalton who assisted in the initial direction and focus of the Spiritual Life Project in the beginning stages through his guidance in work meetings and areas to consider in getting the program off the ground Here and Now After Moeller retired in May 2010 Kidwell took over as convener and has been in the role ever since As convener she makes space for this conversation by bringing together the ideas from students faculty and staff She oversees the Spiritual Life Project steering committee which consists of four other university faculty and staff members who volunteer on this project aside from any other professional obligations Jennifer Dascomb Craig Filar Laura Osteen and Kathleen Shea Smith Each brings a unique perspective to the SLP which all relate to the central values of meaning and authenticity Kidwell who serves as the program director for Global Pathways Certificate and Exchanges is interested in the interfaith dialogue between students and faith identity as a driving force of some students cultural identity Other members of the steering committee are driven by the leadership and service aspect that faith groups often provide the possibility for continued community engagement when students learn about others and branch out of one s own group as well as developing students purpose through their academic majors and career paths While each of the committee members brings something from his or her own experience each falls back on the mission of the Spiritual Life Project developing meaning purpose and authenticity Transformation through Teaching Awards Accomplishments Even in its short history up to now the Spiritual Life Project has already left a lasting mark on the Florida State University campus and students Other than impacting students in panel discussions on interfaith cooperation and spirituality a tangible success of the Spiritual Life Project is the meditation room located on the third floor of the Center for Global Engagement The space was dedicated as an all inclusive non denominational space for all students faculty and staff to take advantage of with directions marked on each of the walls for those who pray or meditate facing a particular way The only requirement is to bring any religious texts to and from the room and not to leave them behind as the room is used to respect all religions and their beliefs Another program that has been implemented by the Spiritual Life Project has been the Transformation through Teaching Awards Students are able to nominate faculty members who have helped them develop their meaning purpose and authenticity At the awards ceremony held at the president s house students and faculty are able to engage in conversations pertaining to the intellectual inspirational and integrative impact faculty have on students In its first year there was an

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  • The International Service Learning Program at the University of Louisville
    police engineering or other specialized agencies hospitals clinics or other groups identified by community leaders http louisville edu student isl Program History Barbados 1997 1998 Gales Point Belize 1999 2007 Belmopan Belize 1999 2007 Dangriga Belize 1999 2007 Red Bank Belize 2000 present Punta Gorda Belize 2002 2005 Cebu Philippines 2009 present Bridgetown Barbados 2010 Gaborone Botswana 2010 present Charlotteville Trinidad Tobago 2011 present Sisak Croatia 2012 The faculty for the program has grown from three to over 23 professors and staff representing 13 different departments and six colleges divisions The programs vary in size and time offered each year Belize and Trinidad Tobago program participants travel over spring break and include delegations of 40 students faculty and staff Botswana and Croatia participants travel during May with a delegation of 30 and the Philippines participants travel during winter break with a delegation of 30 Participating students may have majors in any discipline Currently courses are offered in communication education justice administration nursing college student personnel higher education business sport administration psychology civic leadership and dentistry Obstacles and Opportunities for Growth ISLP has had many opportunities for growth since its inception What started as a small university project in one country has grown into a multi disciplinary multi country program With that type of growth comes many opportunities to reflect discuss and tweak different aspects of the program Three notable aspects of growth are support from university administration available times to travel and the interdisciplinary model Under the leadership of Dr Thomas R Jackson Jr ISLP has expanded and become a prominent program on campus His vision which includes quality student ISLP opportunities in multiple countries and his leadership have been crucial in maintaining an increasing university wide administrative support With growth comes previously unanticipated questions and discussions For example a frequent question is Why do you have multiple programs offered in the spring and only one program offered in the fall The answer because of the available times to travel by students and faculty We need adequate time built into the trip in order to get to the work site to flights to vans to the communities etc to do the work for cultural activities and for reflection In addition there are more available times to travel in the spring semester We also have to be mindful of other courses students are taking we want to enhance their educational experience not detract from other classes Other factors we must consider are the weather conditions of the host country costs for the students and program and other university obligations of the students faculty and staff We have found that being mindful of how ISLP fits into the university calendar has resulted in increased support from students faculty and administrators Being mindful of the experience students have when working in a host country led us to develop an interdisciplinary educational model The creation of this model which is now used with every ISLP trip began with the discussion that students in the

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  • Ethics of Ecotourism and Sustainable Development – Costa Rica
    in rural communities They go to these communities prepared for one form of engaged practice teaching English as a foreign language and the partners discuss with us what they have in mind for that teaching However the students are expected to negotiate the ultimate form this work will take what days each week the location the curriculum the content etc We briefly visit each community in which students are placed at least two times during this period Otherwise the students are on their own to work with the communities Students understand that they are representing themselves the program and the university and they take personal responsibility for how things go They want to contribute and realize that it is largely up to them to make that happen The intensity of the group experience and living in communities with host families also facilitates the development of personal responsibility Students in the U S tend to be considerably independent but such independence is not true to the same degree in Costa Rica culture When students do not uphold their responsibilities to their host families for example they can often witness the anxiety that their irresponsibility may cause for others Having a student initiated discussion about accountability within the group accountability to other members of the group and accountability to the host families is an important learning experience Finally and this is connected with personal responsibility students often develop a renewed sense of passion and personal commitment As instructors we spend a lot of time talking about whether or not one can teach passion and we have not come to a conclusion However what is clear is that the combination of cultural immersion and civic engagement can ignite passion in a profound way Learning becomes concrete and personal There is an opportunity for personal investment and commitment that goes well beyond what we can normally do in a classroom Some students are resistant to this but many students embrace it At least three of the students out of 22 who have participated in the program thus far have gone on to apply to the Peace Corps One starts her assignment this fall the other two are still in the application process Obstacles and Opportunities for Growth The brevity of the program is an obstacle An 8 week program is on the long side of a short term study abroad program but the short side of a long term study abroad program This shows up in two places First four weeks of intensive Spanish instruction is sufficient for more advanced students but for many students it is insufficient to prepare them for the type of engagement we would like them to do They can get by with daily business but language barriers limit their depth of involvement Second three and a half weeks for community engagement limits the types of projects in which students can be engaged A longer period of engagement would be beneficial to both the students and communities However a longer

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  • CC Best Practices
    CC Best Practices CC Case Studies Jon C Dalton ICSV Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook CC Best Practices Filter Title Filter TRIPS Program St Norbert College Character University First Year Experience at DeSales University Interfaith Youth Core EXPLORE Pacific Lutheran University Still Speaking Conversations on Faith Elmhurst College Women s Studies Program University of Central Florida Student Interfaith Scholars DePaul University SERVE 101 Philadelphia University Start Prev 1

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  • Picking a President – Revisited
    65 of the Democrats agreed with the Republican platform statement The most plausible reason for this is that respondents picked the Obama statement regardless of its substance The findings are identical to those from 2008 students chose the candidate over the content Picking a President Candidate Over Content Personality Over Platform PDF from Journal of College Character Abstract In the week leading up to the 2008 presidential election brief excerpts from the Democratic and Republican Party platforms on Higher Education were presented to undergraduate students N 244 at a major HBCU Historically Black College University along with a web address which included the presidential candidate s name However unknown to the respondents the web addresses had been swapped so that the McCain web address headlined the Democratic platform statement and the Obama web address headlined the Republican platform statement The students 80 of whom identified themselves as affiliated with the Democratic Party claimed to agree most with the so called Obama platform statement by a margin of 3 to 2 In other words 63 of the Democrats claimed to agree most with the Republican platform statement The percentage differences were greater than the margin of error The most plausible reason

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