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  • More Than Coursework: Graduate Students Who Lead and Serve - J. Okumu
    in student affairs adminIstration Working with young adults in refugee camps in high poverty communities and military families transitioning into civilian life and embarking on college careers have given me a passionate desire to continue to explore and develop programs that assist in college student transitional experiences growth and development 6 You have many other interests and are involved in other types of activities Can you tell us about those I current serve as Graduate Associate for the College Adjustment Program at Ohio University The College Adjustment Program is funded by the US Department of Education TRIO programs I mentor first generation low income students on one to one conferences to ensure they are on the track to academic success and realization of their life goals Once a week I co teach courses and mentor students during their practicum experiences on Global Issues at the Global Leadership Center GLC of Ohio University The GLC offers a two year under graduate certificate program that focuses on global concerns such as poverty inter faith dialogue international relations environmental concerns and global trade with focuses on South East Asia India Africa and Europe The program entails experiential learning and engages both class work and field research in targeted countries 7 You are from Kenya Tell us a little about your background I was born and raised up in the coastal city of Mombasa Kenya I am the eldest in a family of 2 siblings I spent most of childhood with my grandparents who were professional traditional healers I studied philosophy education and humanities during my college years in Kenya and Zimbabwe I have done some social work in the Rwandese refugee camps immediately after the genocide in Rwanda and taught epace building and conflict transformation courses at the college level in Kenya for 3 years After graduating from Loyola University Maryland with an MS in counseling in 2008 I worked as a clinical counseling intern with the US Department of Defense at Fort Meade Maryland for a year and a half In 2009 I worked for the state of Ohio Department of Mental Health psychotherapeutic programs at the State of Ohio State Psychiatric Hospital in Columbus I am currently a licensed professional counselor in the state of Ohio 8 Describe your undergraduate experience What were some of the most influential experiences on your career and life paths Ignatian theoretical and pedagogical goal of faith that does justice propelled me to engage in experiential learning and hands on work experiences among the Rwandan refugee communities during the 1994 genocide and participate in the study abroad community immersion experiences in the high poverty communities in the Republic of Tchad These experiences vivified the adage I learnt from my late grandfather who always reminded me that a good life is not lived widely but deeply and that it is not in doing things but understanding what you do that brings meaningful joy and satisfaction Jacob with the former President of Botswana 9 Describe what you might

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  • More Than Coursework: Graduate Students Who Lead and Serve - April Winebrenner-Palo
    these questions in mind we pulled together a panel discussion of really stellar local resources Whittney Barth assistant director at The Pluralism Project Prof Francis Clooney director of CSWR Dr Jenny Peace author professor and interfaith leader at Andover Newton Theological School Latifa Ali the first African American Muslim woman leader of an interfaith organization Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries and Chris Stedman an atheist interfaith activist and member of the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard The event was well attended and we have received positive feedback we are already planning another collaborative event between the Project and CSWR for the coming months April Winebrenner Palo and fellow staff members at The Pluralism Project at Harvard University 3 Where do you go after you graduate from Harvard Divinity School where your academic focus is comparative studies with a particular interest in Celtic and Norse folklore mythology Interfaith work is one very important part of my life but the other half of my life is in Comparative Studies with a particular emphasis in Celtic and Norse folklore and mythology primarily in the early Middle Ages After I graduate in 2013 I expect I will take a gap year and work in the interfaith movement I would love to travel during this time After my gap year I anticipate that I will be applying to PhD programs in Comparative Studies Anthropology Folklore or possibly Celtic or Scandinavian Studies 4 College peer culture can have both positive and negative influences on students personal social and academic life What do you see as interfaith programs and initiatives that might moderate the negative influences of peer culture On campus interfaith groups and projects serve much the same purpose as other community building organizations and programs They provide safe healthy nurturing alternatives to potentially toxic campus or community environments I don t necessarily believe that interfaith organizations achieve this goal any more or less successfully than other campus groups 5 The interfaith spirituality and New Atheist movements are gaining momentum on college campuses today How do you see your activism addressing students religious and spiritual needs including both theistic and non theistic perspectives I suspect that the future of the interfaith movement will become less about divisions between different religious identities and more about the division between religious and non religious viewpoints Too often small groups of fundamentalist religious adherents and militant atheist thinkers seem to hijack the discussion each group making a conflicting dogmatic claim about the role of religion in public life Unfortunately I get the distinct impression that too few on either side have bothered to pick up a book on the subject before spouting ignorant views Religion and secular communities are both equally valuable and useful components of our civic life Faith and science are both equally useful ways of viewing the world What really matters is one s commitment to community peace justice and freedom In my work I always try to emphasize these themes 6 Why is it important to get young people involved in the interfaith cooperation movement do you think The Pluralism Project has discovered that among dozens of interfaith organizations around the country engaging youth has emerged as one of the most significant areas of interfaith peacebuilding This is a powerful and important issue youth are among the most religiously diverse groups in the United States and with over thirty million Americans under the age of twenty four youth form a target demographic for interfaith engagement In a landscape characterized by rising religious diversity in which American youth are emerging as a challenging but essential demographic the need is growing for youth involvement in interfaith work The real question is not whether youth should be involved but how organizations can engage youth successfully 7 Do you think that persons who are much better at thinking writing and research and who primarily devote their time to publishing writing and speaking instead of organizing events and groups can be regarded as social activists Or does one type of work help to inform and enrich the other Should students prepare to do both as future activists Doing both is absolutely essential Our work at The Pluralism Project is very much oriented around thinking reading writing publication and public speaking but our research has provided absolutely crucial data for efforts on the ground Our reports and case studies have equipped local interfaith community organizers with essential statistics data and facts about their communities and demographics A community organizer can t apply for a grant build a project target appropriate audiences or manage a group if she doesn t understand the details of her own community or the history of local demographics Vice versa our research efforts are meaningless without the ongoing life and vibrancy of campus local state and nationwide interfaith efforts We depend on their experiences to help guide our research focus and we rely on a rich network of invaluable community affiliates to help guide our way 8 What were your responsibilities at Interfaith Youth Core As an alumna I am an occasional blogger with IFYC s Stay Informed page Previously I was a member of the Interfaith Youth Core s 2010 2011 Fellows Alliance cohort Through close in depth training experiences I successfully coordinated Hamline University s inaugural Better Together campaign We focused on interfaith refugee resettlement efforts collecting household goods and donating our time and resources toward helping local Somali Hmong and Karen refugees in Saint Paul and Minneapolis Before that I was involved in moderating IFYC s Ning website and before that I was selected as a scholar for IFYC s sixth major Leadership Conference in Evanston 9 How does your own faith contribute to your work research and commitment to interfaith I was not raised in and do not currently belong to any particular faith or religious tradition On the contrary my spiritual journey has been characterized by seeking experimenting trying things out and visiting new places Throughout this lengthy journey I came to understand the value of multiple different perspectives and ways of being in the world It s only natural that a spiritual seeker exposed to a variety of ways of life would dedicate herself to interfaith work In this sense I am both a social pluralist and a theological one 10 What has been your greatest challenge as founder writer activist speaker public intellectual 11 What is the downside And how do you best cope with problems that arise This question and Question 11 are pretty intertwined so I think I ll give a joint answer here Sometimes I struggle with words and phrases like common ground occasionally questioning that term s usefulness and limitations for the future as you can see this struggle greatly informed my work on Contours of Common Ground Sometimes I struggle with the interfaith movement s uncertain responses to atheistic humanistic and non religious approaches as I mentioned before I think this issue will become the future of interfaith work in the United States Sometimes I get confused about my role as a person without a particular faith tradition particularly in a group that frequently exhorts its members to clarify or tell stories from their faith Most importantly though I m cognizant that I am not alone in my struggles on these questions Many other interfaith and community activists go back and forth on their perspectives The important thing is to stay involved keep writing keep talking and push the movement toward a better and stronger future If I back out for any reason then the interfaith movement will lose my voice and perspective and I ll be giving up an opportunity to make this world a better smarter place 14 00 Normal 0 false false false EN US X NONE X NONE Questions Submitted to April Winebrenner Palo By Pam Crosby Character Clearinghouse Editor Name April Winebrenner Palo Position s Research Associate The Pluralism Project at Harvard University Publication s Crosses of Straw and Stone Saint Brigid and Irish Cultural Heritage Honors Thesis with Full Distinction Hamline University 2011 Saint Paul MN 2011 Educational Background BA Hamline University 2011 MTS Harvard Divinity School anticipated 2013 Year as Doctoral Student 1 st year MTS Degree Program MTS Masters of Theological Studies focusing in Comparative Studies Educational Institution Harvard Divinity School Please answer any or all of the other questions in as much detail as you would like You may also combine questions Our readers generally like to know how the interviewee solves problems and overcomes obstacles so readers can anticipate those types of problems and learn how to deal with them how interviewees apply their programs to their overall mission and educational philosophy and what sorts of models and programs that interviewees have established and or leading that readers might want to initiate themselves Readers also like to get to know the human side of interviewees as being professionals who have had both successes and struggles Please send photos that you have permission to give me to publish online preferably candids of you with students who would authorize you to send them to me 1 You are a research associate at The Pluralism Project at Harvard University What is its purpose Our mission is to help Americans engage with the realities of religious diversity through research outreach and the active dissemination of resources We document the changing contours of American religious demography study religious communities and civic institutions explore America s new plurality through case studies and other projects and discern the emerging meanings of religious pluralism from a variety of perspectives What are your responsibilities there I conduct research on religious pluralism and religious diversity in the United States My research and reports have contributed to America s Interfaith Infrastructure A Pilot Study http www pluralism org interfaith as well as several online and social media projects I also work with campus and community interfaith resources such as the Center for the Study of World Religions and Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries Other responsibilities include regular shipping and clerical work How would you describe pluralism in the context of this program To me the best response to this question comes from The Pluralism Project s statement on religious pluralism written by the indomitable Dr Diana Eck First pluralism is not diversity alone but the energetic engagement with diversity Diversity can and has meant the creation of religious ghettoes with little traffic between or among them Today religious diversity is a given but pluralism is not a given it is an achievement Mere diversity without real encounter and relationship will yield increasing tensions in our societies Second pluralism is not just tolerance but the active seeking of understanding across lines of difference Tolerance is a necessary public virtue but it does not require Christians and Muslims Hindus Jews and ardent secularists to know anything about one another Tolerance is too thin a foundation for a world of religious difference and proximity It does nothing to remove our ignorance of one another and leaves in place the stereotype the half truth the fears that underlie old patterns of division and violence In the world in which we live today our ignorance of one another will be increasingly costly Third pluralism is not relativism but the encounter of commitments The new paradigm of pluralism does not require us to leave our identities and our commitments behind for pluralism is the encounter of commitments It means holding our deepest differences even our religious differences not in isolation but in relationship to one another Fourth pluralism is based on dialogue The language of pluralism is that of dialogue and encounter give and take criticism and self criticism Dialogue means both speaking and listening and that process reveals both common understandings and real differences Dialogue does not mean everyone at the table will agree with one another Pluralism involves the commitment to being at the table with one s commitments To sum up religious pluralism in America is the active engagement with religious diversity an active seeking of understanding across lines of difference an active approach to our commitments and an active investment in interreligious dialogue and service There is a certain paradox about inclusive worldviews for example some campus leaders and students might say that pluralism is only one interpretation of religion or worldview and being inclusive is actually having an exclusive worldview in that pluralism by its very definition excludes non pluralistic views How would you address a group of students and campus leaders who might bring up this paradox This is a tough question and I m fortunate that none of my campus and community partners have posed this problem to me Personally I think the interfaith movement of the twenty first century stands within the lineage of older social justice and multicultural movements including the ongoing quest for racial or gender justice among others None of these movements have actively excluded people who do not accept the premise of the movement on the contrary all of these movements have tried to reach out instead Antiracist work seeks to educate those who commit racist acts or participate in racist systems Gender justice work seeks to remodel the paradigms of those who enjoy the fruits of gender oppression Interfaith work seeks to build bridges toward religious totalitarians Essentially the act of building an interfaith campus or community depends on outreach to religious totalitarians If a particular religious totalitarian feels that such outreach is a conflict with their worldview then that religious totalitarian has every right to feel that way but they would be incorrect to call it an exclusion What is it like to work with famous author and thinker Diana Eck director of the Pluralism Project Dr Eck is an extremely capable supportive and enthusiastic leader of the team here at The Pluralism Project We see each other regularly for staff meetings and other events While she is obviously a very busy author and professor at Harvard she views her work with The Pluralism Project as a major priority She is constantly pushing us to think ahead and imagine more creative futures for our work here at the Project 2 You were one of the organizers of Contours of Common Ground at Harvard Divinity School Tell us about this event Contours for Common Ground was a collaborative effort between myself at The Pluralism Project and Lucia Hulsether my colleague at the Center for the Study of World Religions Together we imagined an event where top campus and community leaders could discuss hard hitting problems facing the interfaith movement today What do we mean when we use the word interfaith What is common ground What are the edges limits or concerns with common ground as a goal How can the interfaith movement plan for the future be more inclusive or be more aggressive With these questions in mind we pulled together a panel discussion of really stellar local resources Whittney Barth assistant director at The Pluralism Project Prof Francis Clooney director of CSWR Dr Jenny Peace author professor and interfaith leader at Andover Newton Theological School Latifa Ali the first African American Muslim woman leader of an interfaith organization Cooperative Metropolitan Ministries and Chris Stedman an atheist interfaith activist and member of the Humanist Chaplaincy at Harvard The event was well attended and we have received positive feedback we are already planning another collaborative event between the Project and CSWR for the coming months 3 Where do you go after you graduate from Harvard Divinity School where your academic focus is comparative studies with a particular interest in Celtic and Norse folklore mythology Interfaith work is one very important part of my life but the other half of my life is in Comparative Studies with a particular emphasis in Celtic and Norse folklore and mythology primarily in the early Middle Ages After I graduate in 2013 I expect I will take a gap year and work in the interfaith movement I would love to travel during this time After my gap year I anticipate that I will be applying to PhD programs in Comparative Studies Anthropology Folklore or possibly Celtic or Scandinavian Studies 4 College peer culture can have both positive and negative influences on students personal social and academic life What do you see as interfaith programs and initiatives that might moderate the negative influences of peer culture On campus interfaith groups and projects serve much the same purpose as other community building organizations and programs They provide safe healthy nurturing alternatives to potentially toxic campus or community environments I don t necessarily believe that interfaith organizations achieve this goal any more or less successfully than other campus groups 5 The interfaith spirituality and New Atheist movements are gaining momentum on college campuses today How do you see your activism addressing students religious and spiritual needs including both theistic and non theistic perspectives I suspect that the future of the interfaith movement will become less about divisions between different religious identities and more about the division between religious and non religious viewpoints Too often small groups of fundamentalist religious adherents and militant atheist thinkers seem to hijack the discussion each group making a conflicting dogmatic claim about the role of religion in public life Unfortunately I get the distinct impression that too few on either side have bothered to pick up a book on the subject before spouting ignorant views Religion and secular communities are both equally valuable and useful components of our civic life Faith and science are both equally useful ways of viewing the world What really matters is one s commitment to community peace justice and freedom In my work I always try to emphasize these themes 6 Why is it important to get young people involved in the interfaith cooperation movement do you think The Pluralism Project has discovered that among dozens of interfaith organizations around the country engaging youth has emerged as one of the most significant areas of interfaith peacebuilding This is a powerful and important issue youth

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  • More Than Coursework: Graduate Students Who Lead and Serve - Simran Jeet Singh
    and relating to the world I make this process of expanding and opening my students minds the centerpiece of my teaching methodology and structure my courses around challenging my students to empathize and connect with the communities that we study I believe a responsible study of religion requires the scholar to develop a deep appreciation and broad openness for the outlooks of diverse traditions and I try to facilitate this development in relation to each and every religious tradition 5 What do you write about in the Huffington Post For those student activists who would like to write for a publication such as the Huffington Post what advice would you give them I have so far limited my Huffington Post pieces to my area of expertise religion I aim to write these pieces for more general audiences and introduce them to key issues faced by the minority communities to which they can relate For example I recently wrote a piece about the challenges of negotiating multiple identities and the ways in which human rights violations connect with feelings of national identity I have also discussed issues relating to the violent mistreatment of minorities in post 9 11 America and I am currently working on a piece that relates specifically to civil rights violations faced by Sikhs in the United States For those who aspire to write for similar publications I would make a few basic suggestions Write about something that inspires you A writer s voice is much more powerful and compelling when addressing a topic that hits close to home Readers pick up on this and engage much more when the writer is engaged Connect with your audience Chances are that your topic directly pertains to a particular subset of readers Broaden your audience by presenting your material in a way that every reader can relate and empathize Be critical yet constructive Too much of modern journalism seeks to divide and inflame and I find it amazingly powerful when one uses writing and media as vehicles for progress It s always easy to point out problems but it s more useful to suggest possible solutions In his travels abroad Simran enjoys interacting with other people of faith Here he shares a magic moment with a monk in Thailand 6 You recently participated in Odyssey s Town Hall meeting What was the purpose of the meeting What did you talk about The Odyssey Town Hall was an excellent program in which a number of professionals came together to discuss the various ways in which religion and media can work together to create positive change A variety of individuals shared their unique experiences and successes and their stories reminded me of the important role that each of us can play in cultivating a more peaceful and productive society I served on a panel that related to blogging and I spoke specifically on my experiences as a blogger for the New York City marathon As I mentioned previously I was selected as

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  • More Than Coursework: Graduate Students Who Lead and Serve - Joshua Stanton
    a gathering where he helped to bring 75 Jewish leaders current and future rabbis cantors and certified educators to Park51 to stand in solidarity with it in September 2010 7 You won the Bridge Builders Leadership Award from the Interfaith Youth Core IFYC How were you nominated for this award and what has been your most rewarding and challenging work with IFYC I am not entirely sure how I was nominated for the award but I was quite honored and frankly surprised to receive it Since I began working with it five years ago the IFYC has done an incredible amount to support my work and learning I am truly indebted to its staff and leaders for mentoring me and encouraging me to follow the sense of calling I have to at once be a leader rooted in my own tradition and one dedicated to better relations with other traditions The only challenge I have experienced in working with the IFYC is its consistently high standards At times I am unsure I can live up to them but certainly do aspire to 8 You are editor of the Journal of Inter Religious Dialogue In its description on the website one of the objectives of the Journal is to contribute to a more tolerant pluralistic society Can you explain in more detail what sort of society this means and how do you see educational initiatives and programs in colleges and universities playing a role in this goal The Journal of Inter Religious Dialogu e engages thought leaders in discussion about the challenging issues that exist between religious communities those related to violence gender norms competing historical narratives theology and praxis to name but a few Without a place in which to study these topics at greater depth it would be difficult to garner lessons from inter religious interactions and apply them in our work within non profit advocacy and governmental organizations It s our belief that careful rigorous thought can support and sustain effective action for the common good 9 For those student activists who would like to write for a publication such as The Huffington Post what advice would you give them I would suggest that they begin by writing in a journal or diary to see what exactly it is that most inspires them to write Is it an issue of social justice Religion The confluence of the two Politics Once a student knows what s he is most passionate about gathering an audience for one s blog and ultimately writing for a more public forum is likely to be smoother In fact I wish I had done this myself I might have learned a bit sooner about ways in which to be a more effective writer 10 There is a certain paradox about inclusive worldviews for example some campus leaders and students might say that pluralism is only one interpretation of religion or worldview and being inclusive is actually having an exclusive worldview in that pluralism by its

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  • Hardee Doctoral Advisees
    and Dreamer of Dreams 2009 pp 352 354 a dissertation by Sally Evelyn Click dean of students at Butler University Titles and general subjects of their dissertations are from the Current Research Florida State University database Filter Title Filter Hardee Advisees 1987 Hardee Advisees 1986 Hardee Advisees 1985 Hardee Advisees 1984 Hardee Advisees 1983 Hardee Advisees 1982 Hardee Advisees 1981 Hardee Advisees 1980 Hardee Advisees 1979 Hardee Advisees 1978 Hardee

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  • Dr. Pamela Crosby
    Her most valued undertaking may have been interviewing student affairs professionals When you look at programs and you look at the character initiatives you look at the people and the leaders behind them That s why I like to interview people The journal of College and Character looked at the research but we didn t go into depth about authors interest in what they did and how it translated into programs Many of her day to day pleasures were related to tasks the Character Clearinghouse required such as interviewing student affairs professionals including presidents of universities learning about various programs describing best practices and writing book reviews Dr Crosby thrived on the responsibilities associated with the Character Clearinghouse expressing Some people when they retire like to network with women s clubs or play golf but I enjoyed working with the website By communicating with vice presidents of student affairs at other institutions she created opportunities for hardworking staff members who might not otherwise have gained deserved recognition to be featured on the Character Clearinghouse Dr Crosby found reward in creating these opportunities recalling I have found that after I recognized unsung student affairs professionals I started seeing them achieve many more successes It gives people a lot of confidence when their program is highlighted Many professionals who have worked with her value the dedication and commitment evident in her work Dr Dalton reflected upon her efforts by saying She took this project and really developed it into a significant national resource It took a lot of pride energy and dedication It is very much her creation that reflects the hard work that she really put into over the years She does not do things halfheartedly Vice President of Student Affairs at Florida State University Dr Mary Coburn describes her flawless

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  • 2013 - Melvene Hardee
    of Dreams 2009 by Sally Evelyn Click dean of students at Butler University In her ongoing research Alicia Peralta graduate assistant for Educational Programs NASPA Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education will provide information on the works of authors who won the NASPA Melvene D Hardee Dissertation of the Year Award The first section to be posted contains names of Hardee s doctoral advisees Click 2009 and the titles and

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  • 2012 - Merze Tate
    contact she had with them Her mother rarely left the farm and I have no photos of them together at any of her graduations So the challenge may have been the distance and willingness to get other family out of their comfort zones to visit her on campus She was a boarder and maybe there was no opportunity for such a visit e What persons did she get to know I don t have any record of any particular person she may have grown close to for the record of a friendship I also have not seen any mention of even the only other African American boy from her graduating class having been a friend either f Who were her mentors Merze had the mentorship of administrators at the university some of whom have college buildings named for them on WMU s campus to this day Her most influential mentor however was Dr Dwight Waldo the president of the university during her education there His belief in her led to helping her gain employment as a teacher in Indianapolis after setting up three total interviews for her Indianapolis St Louis and Cleveland When she could not get a job in Michigan he made sure she had a place somewhere to use her talents and skills Also after she became a teacher in Indianapolis they corresponded about students Tate provided scholarships to to attend the school She left more than 1 million to the university which shows how its foundation and those who supported her played an important in her life g What sorts of difficult decisions did she have to make before during and soon after her college days I don t think anything was difficult to Merze Tate She seemed to take everything as a challenge I perhaps the most disheartening was being a pioneer in her family for education and travel something not many others embraced or followed She had to decide early if she was living a life for herself or others and chose to further her own opportunities in order to be a benefit to others h How did she exemplify personal and or social responsibility as a student With so few African Americans on the campus it was not hard to recognize Tate and the others However it may have been just as easy to neglect them as well Tate s tenacity and drive were seen to those such as Dr Waldo as a trait worthy of cultivating Because of her academic responsibility and goals her student career was admired by administrators She felt education was the key to so many doors opening and did whatever she could to get as much of it as she could 8 She received a master s degree at Columbia Teacher s College in 1930 What type of experiences did she undergo there She did this during the summers while teaching at Crispus Attucks High School The teachers at Attucks were encouraged to take on courses which would add to their educational resumes I have yet to research her experiences at Columbia Merze Tate being introduced in Africa 9 She earned a Bachelor of Literature Degree from Oxford becoming the first Black American man or woman to receive that degree What type of life was it like for her at Oxford The students of my Travel Club interviewed the historian David Smith at Oxford and asked him the same thing for their documentary on her life Smith said the women in those days didn t have dorms on Oxford s campus and lived in homes off campus with a housemother Tate met many friends who she would later meet in their home countries such as Russia and Australia She attended the school s yachting competitions boat rides down the river with friends and they rode their bikes everywhere One famous photo of Tate is her posed in front of Oxford on her bicycle She met with her advisor Sir Alfred Zimmern who also was an expert in the area of world politics During her summers at Oxford she worked as a tutor in France for the daughter of a countess During her time at Oxford it seems she took many opportunities to travel through Europe as her photos so elegantly display While Tate was the only African American there she was not the only person of a different ethnicity as Oxford students were from many places around the world This may have been a plus for Tate during this era of Jim Crow in the United States Europe has always been a safe haven of sorts for African Americans particularly those in the arts I believe Tate too felt good there In her later years as she suffered from Dementia one relative stated that she often talked as if she were still at Oxford She kept in contact with advisors there over the years and even sent programs from graduations and other accomplishments throughout her life From what I have gathered she loved Oxford and her experience there 10 She also studied German at the University of Berlin As an African American woman in the 1930s this is an interesting story What can you tell our readers about her experiences in Berlin at this volatile time in history Tate saw this time in history as one of great importance She has several clippings from her time at the U of Berlin One relative told of a story of a letter she sent home during her time there He said the letter stated how Tate visited why I have yet to discovered a rally of Hitler s She spoke five languages so understood German She wrote how if this many comes to power it s going to be like nothing we ever seen 11 What was it like for her to be one of the first African American women to earn a doctoral degree at Radcliff Harvard and the first African American woman to earn a PhD in government One

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