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  • 2005 Institute Proceedings Archives
    Mind Heart and Hands through Intentional Community at Calvin College Jeff Bouman Don DeGraaf Mark Mulder Joy Van Marion Calvin College Grand Rapids MI 40506 The Hypothesis Calvin College Cultivating Spiritual Academics for Leadership A Presidential Perspective Thomas B Coburn Naropa University Preparing Students for Leadership in a Pluralistic World Diana Denton Peter Laurence The Multi Faith Imperative A new facility meeting the needs of 21st century students Andrea L

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/institute-proceedings-archives/188-2005-institute-proceedings-archives (2015-06-03)
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  • 2006 Institute Proceedings Archives
    Fallacy A Contribution from the Neurosciences Michael E Cavanagh Mount Olive College Living Lives of Integrity and Truth Rebecca S Chopp Colgate University Creating and Assessing Student Spirituality and Initiatives in Higher Education Jon C Dalton David Eberhardt Pamela C Crosby Florida State University Educating the Heart Head and Hands Servant Leadership as a Transformational Model for Student Success Tracy Y Espy Pfeiffer University Fostering Self Authoring Spirituality in College Women Gina Frieden Katharine Baker Amy Mart Vanderbilt University The Role of Spirituality in Purpose in Life and Academic Engagement Kimberly A Greenway University of North Alabama Joining Hearts and Minds A Contemplative Approach to Holistic Education in Psychology Peter G Grossenbacher Steven S Parkin Naropa University Introduction Jon C Dalton Florida State University Moral and Spiritual Inquiry in the Academic Classroom Scotty McLennan Stanford University Vincentians in Action An Interfaith Model for Civic Learning and Spiritual Growth Siobhan O Donoghue Karl Nass DePaul University Don t Build It and They Will Come Creating Space For Wholeness Meaning and Purpose in Higher Education Carole Robinson Glenn Sterner Trevor Johnson Michigan State University The Impact of Ministry Internships at Saint Louis University Leah M Sweetman Mary Beth Gallagher Saint Louis University

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/institute-proceedings-archives/108-2006-institute-proceedings-archives (2015-06-03)
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  • Institute Proceedings 2007 to Present
    Highlights Keynote Speakers Session Presenters Awards Past Issues Institute Proceedings Archives Journal of College and Character Institute Live Blog Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook Institute Proceedings 2007 to Present Institute Proceedings 2007 to Present Copyright 2015 Character Clearinghouse

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/institute-proceedings-archives/255-institute-proceedings-2007-to-present (2015-06-03)
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  • Videos of Past Speakers
    Insitute Highlights Keynote Speakers Session Presenters Awards Past Issues Institute Proceedings Archives Journal of College and Character Institute Live Blog Announcements Submissions Connect with Us Twitter Facebook Videos of Past Speakers Videos of Past Speakers Copyright 2015 Character Clearinghouse All

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/institute-proceedings-archives/256-videos-of-past-speakers (2015-06-03)
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  • Drs. Alexander & Helen Astin, University of California, Los Angeles
    he organized and conducted and a madrigal group which he organized and conducted for his senior recital While all this musical activity was not directly related to his later work as a researcher the fact that he was also involved in organizing and directing musical ensembles helped to prepare him for his later role in founding and running large scale research activities such as the Cooperative Institutional Research Program CIRP ACE s Office of Research and UCLA s Higher Education Research Institute HERI Lena as a new immigrant from Greece who did not know any English and had little money was primarily focused on survival learning the new language quickly enough to pass her college courses she eventually graduated with honors and holding down several part time and summer jobs Acculturation was also a major challenge Astin Oseguera 2004 find that students from wealthier families were increasingly overrepresented in elite institutions while students of lower socioeconomic statuses have been underrepresented for the past twenty years What factors have contributed to this under representation and how can higher education increase access for low income students In trying to pursue simultaneously the twin goals of equity and excellence American higher education has created a dilemma for itself On the one hand colleges have traditionally defined their excellence in terms of selectivity and exclusivity the most excellent institutions are assumed to be the ones where it is most difficult to gain admission and whose students earn the highest test scores On the other hand admitting more poor students tends to lower test scores given that poor students on average earn lower school grades and lower scores on admissions tests than do more affluent students The pursuit of equity thus constitutes a threat to selectivity while the continuing pursuit of excellence makes it more difficult to achieve greater equity When addressing the inequality of access in the United States do you think higher education institutions are narrowing the disparity or exacerbating the problem Is there anything that can be done so that colleges and universities can help address the inequality issues As long as colleges and universities insist on defining excellence in terms of the admissions test scores and or school grades of their entering students the goal of greater equity will be in conflict with the pursuit of excellence Sandy s suggested resolution of this dilemma see Achieving Educational Excellence Jossey Bass 1985 is to redefine excellence in educational terms i e as the capacity of an institution to educate its students to their fullest potential He has called this the talent development approach to defining excellence Under this definition one institution s success in educating its students in no way detracts from the success of any other institution and all institutions can achieve a high level of excellence regardless of their level of selectivity However given how strongly committed most institutions are to maintaining and enhancing their selectivity and exclusivity prospects for achieving significantly greater equity seem dim How do you think

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/249-2015-keynote-speakers/1064-drs-alexander-helen-astin-university-of-california-los-angeles (2015-06-03)
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  • Dr. Shaun R. Harper, University of Pennsylvania
    Africana Studies and Gender Studies at the University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education Professor Harper s research examines race and gender in education equity trends and racial climates on college campuses Black and Latino male student success in high school and higher education and college student engagement He is author of over 90 peer reviewed journal articles and other academic publications Review of Research in Education Journal of Higher Education Journal of College Student Development The Review of Higher Education and Teachers College Record are some journals in which Dr Harper s research is published His 12 books include Student Engagement in Higher Education 2009 2015 College Men and Masculinities 2010 and Advancing Black Male Student Success from Preschool through Ph D 2015 The American Educational Research Association presented him its 2010 Early Career Award and 2014 Relating Research to Practice Award He also received the 2008 Association for the Study of Higher Education Early Career Award The New York Times Los Angeles Times Washington Post USA Today Wall Street Journal Sports Illustrated Chronicle of Higher Education Inside Higher Ed and numerous other media

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/249-2015-keynote-speakers/1063-dr-shaun-r-harper-university-of-pennsylvania (2015-06-03)
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  • Dr. Andrew Seligsohn, Campus Compact President
    civic engagement plays in higher education Colleges and universities exist to serve the public good That is why private institutions are non profits and are granted a tax exemption because they are serving a public interest It is the reason we have public universities at all because our states and cities identify our public interests The obligation of these institutions is to identify which public goods they can effectively advance One obvious answer is that colleges and universities teach students and produce research and knowledge to benefit society But we have the opportunity to do much more than that in a number of ways We can bring people together to focus on the important issues in communities We can leverage the enormous human capacity that in embedded in our institutions to address local and national needs we can even think about colleges and universities as purchasing agents employers real estate developers and we can ask how to connect those roles in a way that serves the community around us In addition to the direct experiences we can create for students we need to think deeply about the model that the institution is for the students who are within it We cannot teach our students to be engaged citizens and expect them to ask questions about how they can serve the needs of the community if our institutions are not themselves asking that question If our institutions step back and say we are only here to do particular things and not concern ourselves with broader public goods I don t think we can expect students to get the message that it is really important for them to concern themselves with such things Is there a curriculum that you find best facilitates service learning with students I would characterize it as an approach rather than a curriculum and I would describe that approach as engaged civic learning I think of that as a category that is larger than just service learning which is just one form of engaged civic learning but there are others For example you might engage students in advocacy work which isn t exactly service but it engages them in the community and gets them asking questions We ve learned a lot through research that has been done in the field There needs to be a strong experiential component meaning we need to put students in real settings where they are seeking to achieve real goals The more students feel like it matters the more powerful the experience We need to focus on preparing them for the work specifically with skills and information they need in the particular setting But I also think it is very important that we provide students with an understanding of the broader context in which the work is situated For example when I was at Rutgers a colleague and I developed a course we called Rutgers Camden Civic Scholars Our Civic Scholars were very engaged in the city of Camden and we also taught a course called Making Social Change that was their introductory seminar to the program We framed it around the theme of inequality and we examined the growing economic inequality in the United States for two reasons First we wanted students to understand that virtually every movement for social change is grounded in a claim that there is some inequality that needs to be rectified We also did it because we knew at the practical level that Camden is one of the poorest cities in the United States If our students were going to be out working in a context where many of the people they work with are struggling with getting by on very low incomes we want them to understand why that is It s one thing to know about someone s particular situation it s something else to understand that this is a structural reality You might be seeing one school family or health clinic but that fits into a broader picture that needs to be understood if you want to make change in the long run That creates an opportunity to interpret analyze critique to try to make sense of the experiences you are having in addition to asking questions about claims you ve read on literature of inequality Are the things you re seeing matching up with what you ve read Is there experience based knowledge that you are able to bring to the table that may cause you to reevaluate what scholars are saying about these issues It shows students that they can become creators of new knowledge if they get themselves into the world I ve seen it be a very powerful thing for students to recognize that They become creators of new knowledge as they put themselves in situations where they are seeing things that no one has seen in that particular way That changes their learning and it changes the questions that are putting on the agenda for all the students in their classes In 2004 when we took the students up to New Hampshire we stopped in Cambridge MA on the drive back to New York for a panel at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard There were experts on the panel and one of the students asked a question in which he referred to the field work the students had been doing All of a sudden all of the panelists turned the table and began asking the students questions about what they had seen and what voters had said when they knocked on their door They wanted to know how people were responding and engaging Suddenly the students saw that because they had been out there doing the work they had knowledge to contribute that was unique and valuable Can you talk a little bit about the importance of research to the future of civic engagement and what areas of research do you find most promising for moving forward in the field As a practitioner in this area I

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/249-2015-keynote-speakers/1062-dr-andrew-seligsohn-campus-compact-president (2015-06-03)
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  • Clare Cady, Oregon State University
    another person who was doing the exact same thing at Michigan State University Nate Him and I started chatting He had some funding and I had person power So we put those together and started the Alliance It s currently a digital community that is focused on connecting folks across the country on campuses In 2012 we launched at the national conference in Orlando and we have been slowly building Right now a lot of it is just folks being able to call Nate and I and us being able to connect people We are about to open a new section of the website for people to talk directly to each other and we are hoping to continue from there with other things such as social development maybe Around 100 institutions are now a part of the College and University Food Bank Alliance 3 What role do you think higher education plays in combating poverty and hunger If you have a college degree you will earn 33 more throughout the time that you are present in the work force So we know that getting a degree is going to be very important to people s economic advancement So creating and developing access is going to be very important for campuses When we think about who in our country is most likely to be experiencing poverty we are talking about people of color queer folk people with disabilities just groups of people who are already disenfranchised in society So it is very important that we think about socioeconomics as well as social support for people who are seeking a degree We need to think about ways we can help people transition to our campuses and ways that we can make the campus climate comfortable In addition when people experience emergencies not receiving a cold shoulder I think that is what a lot of students experience Sometimes students don t take anything from us They just need someone to say I see your pain and I m here for you There is a retention issue which deals with retaining students coming from low income backgrounds or those who hit economic crisis for whatever reason 4 What is the most rewarding experience when working with students experiencing poverty homelessness and food insecurity One of the students who worked in my office for three years from a generational poverty background took 8 years to complete a four year degree because she regularly needed to take time off to make money Her goal was to be a pharmacist As she was working to serve students she was one of those students at the same time When she graduated it was into a pharmacy school which she deferred for a year so that she could save money She said to me I don t think I would have stayed in school if it hadn t been working with you Those are the moments where you realize the work you do on a day to day basis

    Original URL path: https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/249-2015-keynote-speakers/1061-clare-cady-oregon-state-university (2015-06-03)
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