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  • The Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship at Georgetown University
    CNDLS commemorative video Read the blog post New ITEL Award Recipients Announced CNDLS is delighted to announce funding decisions for the fifth initiative on Technology Enhanced Learning ITEL call including members of the four ITEL cohorts and recipients of both Open Track grants and GeorgetownX MOOCs See the awardees Read the formal announcement letter Teaching Our team of experienced educators facilitates a broad based program that promotes discovery engagement and diversity in an ever expanding conception of learning Technology Our mission is to bridge a historic gulf between pedagogy and technological advances Today CNDLS integrates a teaching and learning center with the latest educational technology Assessment How do we know our students are learning in the ways we hope and expect We can help faculty formulate questions about student learning and develop plans for gathering evidence Research The landscape of higher education is changing and we are engaged in advanced research on the pedagogical conditions and environments that best help students learn Twitter CNDLS Georgetown Join Georgetown s BeeckCenter for the final session of their seminar on Social Movements in the 21st Century https t co r2IU93rTQY Dec 1 2015 5 23 p m CNDLS Georgetown Happening today RSVP for the 4pm Georgetown Slavery Teach In incl presentations by DrMChatelain UVADeanKvD https t co 22LyKcG0qV Dec 1 2015 5 17 p m CNDLS Georgetown Can rethinking question design results analysis lend greater meaning to student evaluations highered chronicle https t co nY90NyVIzh Dec 1 2015 5 p m Visit our Twitter feed to read more Articles Well being Diversity and the University Community Engelhard Project Hosts Second Conversation in Series on Educating the Whole Person November 24 2015 On November 18 the Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning collaborated with the Doyle Engaging Difference Program to host a conversation

    Original URL path: https://cndls.georgetown.edu/ (2015-12-03)
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  • CNDLS: Projects
    Rebecca Kukla Madison Powers John Keown and Karen Stohr INFX523 01 Globalization s Winners and Losers Challenges for Developed and Developing Countries Course Instructor Theodore H Moran MEDX202 01 Genomic Medicine Gets Personal Course Instructors Bassem R Haddad Kevin Fitzgerald Alessandro Ghidini Eden Haverfield Anne Deslattes Mays Jeanne Meck Beth N Peshkin Reem Saadeh Luc Wathieu and Sheila Cohen Zimmet HUMX421 01 The Divine Comedy Dante s Journey to Freedom Part 1 Course Instructor Frank Ambrosio GUIX 501 01 Terrorism and Counterterrorism Course Instructor Daniel Byman Close ITEL We are pleased to announce the initial portfolio of faculty projects funded under the Initiative on Technology Enhanced Learning These projects represent interdisciplinary collaborations and innovative approaches to teaching and learning Digital Rome Tommaso Astarita History Josiah Osgood Classics Douglas Boin Classics Level 1 Tangible and Embodied Computing Evan Barba CCT Level 1 How Technology Can Enhance Writing Instruction at Georgetown Maggie Debelius Writing Program Level 1 National Security Crisis Law Automated Problem Sets and Web based Media Outlet Laura Donohue Law Level 1 Flipping Parts of the Public Finance Classroom Nora Gordon GPPI Level 1 The Virtual Bridge Bernie Cook Lilian Hughes Film and Media Studies Level 1 Use of Tablet Computer in Large Lecture Classroom Arik Levinson Economics Level 1 Incorporating Global Dialogue into Writing and Culture Seminars Using Web based Conferencing Technologies Sherry Linkon English Level 1 Using an E learning Authoring Tool for Developing Self Directed Learning Modules in the School of Medicine Taeyeol Park Medicine Level 1 Blending an Upper Division German Course Peter Pfeiffer German Level 1 Mind the Gap Elizabeth Stephen SFS Level 1 Filling the gaps Edward Van Keuren Physics Level 1 LING001 Introduction to Language Jeffrey Connor Linton Linguistics Level 2 Web based computer simulation exercises for the study of evolutionary genetics Matthew Hamilton Biology Pilot Using Technology to Enhance Teaching in Physician Patient Communication Stacey Kaltman Medicine Pilot Toward a partial hybrid curriculum for Spanish lower level courses Ronald Leow Spanish and Portuguese Level 2 CLED Flipped Grammar Project Jennifer Lubkin Andrew Screen CLED Level 2 Using the OLI Platform to Develop Online Materials to Support Teaching Quantitative Methods Statistics in International Politics Parina Patel and Oded Meyer SFS and Mathematics Level 2 Electronic Testing to Enhance Learning in the School of Medicine Dean Rosenthal Medicine Pilot The Evidence Game Tanina Rostain Law Level 2 Improving Computer Science 1 Clay Shields Mark Maloof Computer Science Level 2 Music and Public Policy in the Age of Modern Media Anna Celenza Performing Arts Pilot Multifunctional Scalable Application of Educational Technology to the Teaching of a Core Health Sciences Discipline Adam Myers Medicine Level 3 Close Doyle faculty projects Doyle faculty fellows embark to redesign their courses to include principles of diversity The aim of the Doyle fellows is to encourage students to think critically about diversity as it relates to their lives and surroundings Jazz and Human Relationships Doyle Fellow Ben Harbert wanted to create opportunities for his Jazz History students to make connections

    Original URL path: https://cndls.georgetown.edu/projects/ (2015-12-03)
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  • CNDLS: Apprenticeship in Teaching Program
    teachers The AT program offers graduate students the chance to participate in workshops and engage in authentic teaching related typical faculty tasks with mentorship from current faculty and CNDLS professional teaching staff These tasks are designed to give participants increased confidence and preparation for an academic position with teaching responsibilities Whom is the AT program for All interested graduate students in both masters and doctoral programs are eligible to participate Participation may range from attending occasional workshops to pursuing program completion There is no charge to students or their department to participate in the AT program Graduate students at any point in their careers are welcome to participate in the AT program However because of the number and variety of requirements it is recommended that the student preferably begin two years or at least one and a half years before graduating The AT program does not replace departmental teacher preparation courses but can be incorporated into a larger curriculum of professional development Program Requirements In order to receive a notation on the academic transcript students must complete the following requirements Email a scanned signed Program Registration Form to atprogram georgetown edu Attend an introductory workshop Introduction to Teaching Resources held at the beginning of each semester Note This workshop is NOT prerequisite to other workshops Attend an additional six workshops 4 core 2 elective Complete four authentic teaching tasks by submission deadline Note As of January 2015 only electronic submissions will be accepted Email atprogram georgetown edu with your intended graduation date and again once you have completed the AT program Program Completion Participants must finish the AT program within their graduate career to receive the transcript notation If you plan to complete or have completed all the requirements please email atprogram georgetown edu during your final semester at the

    Original URL path: https://cndls.georgetown.edu/atprogram/ (2015-12-03)
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  • CNDLS: The Doyle Engaging Difference Program
    Difference Program Deepening Georgetown s Commitment to Tolerance Diversity Program Materials Faculty Fellows Symposium Publications Film and Culture Series Doyle Diversity Grants Related Links Doyle Program Website I am grateful that the Doyle Program nudged me out of my comfort zone and forced me to rethink my teaching objectives and strategies Barbara Mujica The Doyle Program serves the entire Georgetown University community and is a campus wide collaboration between the

    Original URL path: https://cndls.georgetown.edu/doyle/ (2015-12-03)
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  • CNDLS: Georgetown ePortfolio Initiative
    scholarly achievements and goals This reflection can take place textually visually or multimodally What is the purpose and value of an ePortfolio Not only do ePortfolios serve a practical purpose by allowing students to collect archive and publish their work they also help students to draw connections among different projects and to integrate topics and themes across disciplines and semesters In selecting and organizing work to include in an ePortfolio students are encouraged to envision the big picture of their academic journeys and to reflect on their overall goals and accomplishments ePortfolios serve both a personal and a public function helping students to synthesize work for themselves and allowing them to share that work with others Additionally ePortfolios can benefit the university by allowing faculty and administrators to track student progress over time both individually and collectively Georgetown ePortfolio Initiative Reflective lifelong learning is at the core of Georgetown University s mission The University s founding principle to promote intellectual ethical and spiritual understanding has been a constant through our changing times As our enduring values continue to shape each generation of graduates we strive to improve the environments that help our students become thoughtful socially conscious learners who are responsible stewards of their education The Georgetown University ePortfolio Initiative builds coherence around three main principles making reflection an integral part of learning metacognition making connections across courses and programs integrative learning and highlighting the social component of learning social pedagogies The initiative s focus on principles that are consistent with the University s ideals and values is expressive of the unique character of the Georgetown University ePortfolio Initiative In the initial phase of Georgetown s ePortfolio Initiative ePortfolios are already being used in a variety of contexts For example Students in Betsi Stephen s STIA honors program in the School of Foreign Service create ePortfolios which allow them to synthesize the interdisciplinary work that they have done over the course of their degree at Georgetown Adam Rothman uses what we describe as the hub and spoke model in his history courses which combines a course blog and ePortfolios to encourage students through a synthesis of collaboration and ownership This integration of shared the course blog and individual each ePortfolio gives students a chance to participate on multiple levels as well as complete the course with an ePortfolio to continue to build up or share Example Robynne Mellor History grad student research portfolio blog As students in the Masters in Nursing Education program approach the end of their time in the program they are required to build a portfolio to document their nursing education credentials and reflect on their growth as practitioners While some students choose to create a traditional paper portfolio others like Katherine elect to create an ePortfolio for its accessibility Example Katherine Cargill Nursing CCNS For more examples of ePortfolios and a fuller description of some popular ePortfolio models please see the Commons page on ePortfolios ePortfolio Technology Tools for Creating ePortfolios ePortfolios can take a variety

    Original URL path: https://cndls.georgetown.edu/eportfolios/ (2015-12-03)
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  • CNDLS: GeorgetownX
    worlds Its focus is on exploring the relationship and responsibilities of the individual to authorities both civic and divine It pursues these issues through the lens of some of the major genres of Classical literature including epic history tragedy and comedy and philosophy The course emphasizes the common interests in all these forms but also takes note of their particular approaches Students will pay particularly close attention to the ways in which the texts they are reading offer a particular vision of the relationship of human beings to one another and to the gods in the process they will be introduced to the ways in which these texts both reflect and respond to the broader cultures of which they are a part Course Instructor Charles A McNelis and Alexander Sens Platform Canvas GUIX 501 01 Terrorism and Counterterrorism Launched October 1 2014 Relaunches September 24 2015 Course length 8 weeks Watch course intro video Register Terrorism has gone from a persistent yet marginal security concern to one of the most important security problems of our day indeed there are few countries that do not suffer from some form of terrorism Though many terrorist attempts fail some groups wage lengthy and bloody campaigns and in exceptional cases kill hundreds or even thousands in pursuit of their ends Course topics include the nuances involved in defining terrorism the nature of Al Qaeda Hamas and other important groups the effectiveness of different counterterrorism tools like detention and military force linkages or the lack thereof between terrorism and world religions like Islam terrorist recruiting counterterrorism and the rule of law the political context in South Asia and the Middle East and emerging issues like cyber terrorism Course Instructor Daniel Byman Platform edX INFX523 02x Globalization s Winners and Losers Challenges for Developed and Developing Countries Launched October 7 2014 Course length 7 weeks Watch course intro video Register Who are the winners and losers of globalization What should be done to improve outcomes for all This course will examine how the spread of trade investment and technology across borders affects firms workers and communities in developed and developing countries It investigates who gains from globalization and who is hurt or disadvantaged by globalization The course will explore difficult questions such as How can developing countries avoid the resource curse What are some possible methods to deal with possible sweatshop abuses How can emerging market economies take advantage of supply chains from local firms into developed country markets How might globalization contribute to wage inequality in developed countries Should developed countries protect or promote manufacturing jobs Is China becoming an economic superpower Is the United States in economic decline Course Instructor Theodore H Moran Platform edX HUMX421 01 The Divine Comedy Dante s Journey to Freedom Part 1 Launched October 15 2014 Course length 6 weeks Watch course intro video Visit the course page Register Jorge Luis Borges the great Argentine writer said that no one should deny themselves the pleasure of reading Dante s

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  • CNDLS: Teaching & Technology
    going out into the community and being civically engaged offers a perfect context within which to raise issues related to mental health how does one cope when confronted with injustice and the knowledge that one cannot solve all the problems of the world What do we do when we realize that our own privilege is inextricably linked to privileges that have been denied to others through no apparent fault of our or their own Through the Engelhard component of the class students focus directly on managing the stress and conflict that accompanies recognition of individual responsibility and social injustice With the help of a campus mental health professional and via their own personal reflection students learn about effective strategies for coping with confrontation in discussions about controversial issues with others including violence and race related prejudice Professor Voke explains that when she incorporates mental health and wellness themes throughout the entire course she finds that her students are more engaged and reflective about material Additionally Engelhard has positively influenced her students in that it has continuously fostered an atmosphere of openness in her classroom Engelhard Goal My main goal in this course is for my students to develop an appreciation of the complexity of the context of teaching and learning I want them to understand that schooling and education are for better and for worse about much more than the transmission and absorption of factual information within the classroom I want them to see that teaching and learning are inextricably connected to the social political and moral context in which they find themselves And I want them to understand that education and schooling affect not only the facts we come to know but also how we feel how we treat others what we believe to be true and good what we do in the world and ultimately the kind of world we create for ourselves and others I want to empower them to become active agents within their own educational process and by extension within their communities PHIL 157 Community Based Learning Civic Engagement Public Education This course focuses on the relationships between civic engagement and education in a society that seeks to be a liberal democracy Specifically the course focuses on two central dichotomies 1 the role that education ought to play for a society to function as a liberal democracy as opposed to the role that education actually does play in our society and its consequences for our democracy and 2 the role that the public ought to play in education in a liberal democracy as opposed to the role that the public does play in education in our society and its consequences for our democracy As part of a Community Based Learning curriculum students will participate in the surrounding community and learn from those experiences Throughout the semester students will have opportunities to make connections between theory and direct experience apply theory to the world outside the classroom and use experiences gained in the community to evaluate theory in the classroom In the fall semester of 2008 the Engelhard module of the course focused on moral responsibility and the psychological response to injustice within the community Maia Shanklin a representative from Peaceoholics spoke to the class about violence and conflict resolution at Ballou High School the public school in Southeast D C where students volunteered Close x Medical Anthropology In her Medical Anthropology course Sylvia Önder wanted to push students to think about difference in new ways Specifically she focused on the experiences of those with diverse abilities and of students who are veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Önder organized the course around two new pedagogical strategies embodied experiences and anonymous posts to the class website The embodied experiences presented students with tasks that forced them to move outside their comfort zones through a series of dramatic enactments Activities ranged from transgressing social norms like eye contact to taking on a disability and observing how it impacts one s interactions on campus to participating in a mini boot camp to simulate the physical and mental conditioning of student veterans The anonymous assignments were designed to give students the opportunity to share their honest reactions to their experiences without worrying about how their thoughts would be perceived by the professor or their classmates These posts as well as student reflection essays revealed the impact the Doyle approach had on student experiences in the course Embodied experiences present students with tasks that force them to move outside their comfort zones through a series of dramatic enactments Önder believes that communicating the Doyle inspired goals of the course with her students was essential to deepening their engagement with the theme of diversity In her words This made it possible to go much farther in one semester than the normal approach and made students feel alert to differences and similarities between themselves and others in the class Close x Center for Language and Education Development Jennifer Lubkin wanted to expose her international students to different perspectives and to help them develop critical thinking skills as preparation for eventual success in U S university programs The students engaged with local Deaf culture through a reading assignment the memoir Deaf in D C by Madan Vasishta a discussion with the author events at Georgetown s DiversABILITY Forum and a field trip to Gallaudet University Lubkin was gratified to be able to share in an authentic learning experience with her students as she herself gained a new perspective on Deaf culture Close x Global Climate Change Ecology Gina Wimp Biology began her teaching career by emulating her own professors who had largely relied on traditional lectures and textbooks However she soon realized that there were better ways to ignite students interest in the rapidly changing field of ecology Wimp challenges her Global Climate Change Ecology students to dive into primary sources and teaches them how to approach both popular and scientific literature with a critical eye By comparing articles from different sources students learn how to evaluate data representations and experimental designs Wimp finds that students take satisfaction in scrutinizing articles for inconsistencies or misrepresentations as they develop these new critical skills and become more active readers Students Wimp stresses need to be able to differentiate good science from bad science Taking advantage of the controversial nature of the course subject Wimp encourages students to follow news items on the topic and to write letters to the editor further engaging them in debates on environmental policy Wimp also involves her students in citizen science initiatives such as Project Budburst which asks participants to monitor the phenology of a particular tree over time Again drawing on what she feels was lacking in her own educational experience Wimp wants her Ecological Analysis students to be able to apply the statistical concepts they are learning to their own research She sends her students out into the field early on so that they can practice working as research scientists Students have to deal with the real world and real data As an ecologist the sooner they can learn that the better Gina Wimp Students also learn the skills of a research scientist by working directly with Wimp who strives to develop collegial relationships with her students She brings her students to the muggy salt marshes of New Jersey and North Carolina to conduct fieldwork on the changing ecosystems there While Wimp s students are motivated by her expertise in the field of ecology Wimp in turn is inspired by the excitement her students bring to the topic and is committed to empowering them as scientists Close x Wikipedia Education Project At a time when so many educators are discouraging students from relying on Wikipedia for assignments a few are taking a different approach encouraging their students to become active participants in the process of knowledge production on Wikipedia It s part of the Wikipedia Education Program WEP which aims to have students and professors engage with the online encyclopedia as a teaching and learning tool For Professor Adel Iskandar an adjunct professor in the Communication Culture and Technology CCT program Wikipedia provides a malleable platform for knowledge production that reflects the current period of social change especially in the Arab world All three of his courses last year Embattled Media Conflict and War Journalism New Media Innovation Community Dissidence and Media Communications in the Arab World involved students working collaboratively on Wikipedia articles about media and politics Iskandar s students not only learned but also contributed new material to Wikipedia to teach others Each of Iskandar s courses has had two Wikipedia components article creation and in class group edits Creating articles means that the students have to become explorers discovering legitimate sources on emerging social movements and technological advancements Iskandar guides students to write creatively but neutrally about technological phenomena as they unfold stating the facts without taking sides He also reiterates the need to make articles relevant for the Wikipedia community and the public at large To edit students have to think critically about what would be worth adding to the articles Here Iskandar encourages his students to collaborate and find a balance with multiple perspectives Such guiding principles help augment high impact learning outcomes such as media and information literacy critical thinking and writing skills development How has Iskandar ensured that this online collaboration will continue even after his courses end For one thing he has helped transform the program into a transnational initiative supporting a WEP in Cairo Egypt Not only did his students create new articles for the English Wikipedia but they fostered a new incentive for translation as the Arabic language Wikipedia develops Adel Iskandar s efforts in his courses and this international partnership will encourage students to be active collaborators and engage with Wikipedia as a platform for knowledge production as well as curricular learning Close x Biology and Biochemistry Over the past fifteen years Anne Rosenwald Biology has come to realize that the collective brain power of her students is a much more powerful teaching tool than the stand and deliver lecture format Why not use that collective power by getting students involved in teaching each other and in independent research as much as possible asks Rosenwald There is so much to learn that it is probable students will not remember even ten percent of the facts My job is to sift through the material emphasize the main points and give students a hierarchy on which they can hang the facts Anne Rosenwald Even in a large course like Biochemistry with a hundred students Rosenwald integrates genuine research projects in the curriculum expecting her students not only to design experiments but to interpret the results and evaluate their methodology Rosenwald champions the idea of giving undergraduate students a real flavor of what being a research scientist is like and doing so as early as possible in the students time at Georgetown She works with two national groups the Genome Consortium for Active Teaching GCAT and the Genome Education Partnership GEP which are dedicated to bringing cutting edge research techniques to undergraduates Specifically these efforts take advantage of dramatic innovations in genomics proteomics and bioinformatics Rosenwald equips her Biochemistry students with free online tools for protein and DNA analysis By using those web tools the students are able to see first hand what investigation is all about Additionally as part of Biology s department s initiative to shape Georgetown undergraduates into more adept communicators of science Rosenwald incorporates one on one writing assignments She works to increase students aptitude for fluent expression of scientific terminology and stresses that students must first know their audience Rosenwald emphasizes that precision in science writing is just as important as precision in lab work This is an ongoing process one that students engage in at the beginning of their undergraduate careers and continue through their senior thesis experiences As she continues to find new ways for her students to practice research and writing skills Rosenwald is committed to giving her students a lasting approach to the material Close x Introduction to the US Political System For his class Introduction to the US Political System a course that boasts an enrollment of nearly 150 students Mark Rom turned to a course blog to help stimulate class discussion and personal interaction among students Because class discussion can be intimidating in such a large class Rom decided to integrate a course blog into his curriculum in order to ensure that all students had the opportunity to engage in meaningful discussion about American politics Because Rom s course fulfills a major requirement for government majors and a general education requirement for the College Introduction to the U S Political System is guaranteed to draw a crowd With the majority of his students studying in their first or second year at Georgetown Rom believes that it is especially important for students to interact both with each other and as a class through dynamic conversation I see student engagement with the course blog as a really constructive form of activism where people write their ideas and putting them out there for public consumption Mark Rom In order to move discussion beyond the handful of outgoing students brave enough to speak in front of 150 people Rom requires students to write three posts per week on the course blog Posts can range from an entry on almost any aspect of American politics to a response to another student s post Rom is impressed with the length depth and breadth of discussion that has grown within the blog Although many students began the semester with shorter less analytical pieces Rom has seen a major increase in quality of conversation and in the quality of writing seen in the blog posts throughout the semester Rom believes that students improve their writing and analytical skills through repeated practice which is another reason why the blog has been a useful pedagogical tool for Rom s large class Although students are only required to write three short posts per week Rom notes that if he took all of the students posts and put them into the format of formal papers many students would find that they had written the equivalent of twenty page papers over the semester Because it is all too easy to forget class content once a course is completed Rom believes that the blog will become a part of the way students think and communicate on a daily basis even after the class is over Rom hopes that constant engagement with the blog will allow students to construct their own meaning of American politics that will remain with them indefinitely as opposed to passively absorbing lectures that will be forgotten when the class is over Close x Dante and the Christian Imagination In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination Frank Ambrosio found it difficult to teach students to move beyond basic levels of interpretation and to relate Dante s Divine Comedy to their own lives Inspired by medieval illuminated manuscripts Frank Ambrosio envisioned a digital version of Dante s Divine Comedy which would allow students to create personalized annotated versions of the poem With the help of CNDLS Eddie Maloney and Bill Garr Director and Assistant Director for Research Development this project known as MyDante became a reality Our goal is to introduce Dante to a whole new generation of readers in a way that makes Dante at home in our world and us at home in his Frank Ambrosio MyDante teaches contemplative reading through a combination of digital tools and pedagogical resources The site acts as a guide through the Divine Comedy leading readers through a cohesive interpretation of the text through commentaries by Ambrosio and other materials It enables collaboration among students by providing a structured virtual space for discussion At the same time it makes the reading experience profoundly personal by allowing readers to create their own annotations images and reflective journal entries MyDante builds on Ambrosio s commitment to convincing students that the texts they read are significant to their own lives In class Ambrosio helps to make Dante s poem meaningful by relating it to poetry by Pablo Neruda sculptures by Michelangelo and the film Dead Man Walking Students enjoy and remember his courses Ambrosio has been selected by students to receive both the Edward Bunn and Dorothy Brown teaching awards Ambrosio is currently at work on a public version of MyDante which will allow students teachers and researchers across the world to join a diverse interdisciplinary community of Dante readers Due to our engagement with MyDante the course became far more than a philosophy course It became an interactive journal a colloquium a journey and a cross disciplinary synthesis of scholarship Rob Begin student Close x Mathematics Probability Statistics Mahlet Tadesse wanted to give students in her Probability Statistics course MATH 040 as much feedback as possible while ensuring that their assignments were sufficiently rigorous despite the logistical difficulties associated with teaching a large class Tadesse finds that students need to do a lot of practice problems to reinforce the statistical concepts learned in the classroom However grading the work of two hundred students every week is impractical In order to give students timely feedback Tadesse introduced a web based technology called MathXL which offers multiple choice and free response questions tutorials and instant evaluation of student answers Students were assigned MathXL problems weekly in addition to biweekly traditional textbook exercises In addition when Tadesse taught MATH 040 in Spring 2009 she continued to incorporate the i clicker system in her lectures as Kimberly Sellers had done when teaching the course in Fall 2008 Like Sellers Tadesse finds that the use of clickers increases student engagement and helps identify statistical concepts students may not have grasped well Based on the mid term evaluation Tadesse conducted both the i clicker and MathXL technologies were quite popular among students About fifteen percent of the students

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  • CNDLS: Online Programs
    tradition of excellence and innovation in teaching and learning We offer the same academic rigor as our on campus programs and provide our online students with both student and academic services to support their learning Georgetown s institutional approach to online programs ensures that online education at Georgetown is part of the institution s systems of governance and academic oversight ensuring the integrity of our online offerings What are some considerations for developing an online course Fully online courses allow students to take courses from geographically remote locations without any need to come to campus Hybrid courses on the other hand take advantage of both the on campus and online learning space Depending on the programmatic approach whether the program is fully online or whether it offers both on campus and online learning opportunities for students the considerations for developing an online course will vary However the considerations generally fall within the following categories Curriculum mapping and assessment Course level alignment outcomes content assessment Learning space and technology Student and academic support services Faculty support services Faculty and student development Monitoring and evaluation including institutional and learning analytics What is our approach and methodology The CNDLS approach to online programming connects the learning process and learning outcomes at multiple levels institutional curricular course and individual This integrative approach to our online programming enables students faculty and staff to explore intermediate process outcomes With this approach adjusting the direction of the teaching and learning strategies during a course of study becomes intentional and visible To implement this approach we follow an attentive and structured learning design process for the development of new online programs and or re design of existing ones This process focuses on the examination of the affordances of the learning space itself across the institutional curricular and course

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