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  • Buy Now, Pay Later: Credit in a Consumer Society
    century it also had to adapt to the rise of a mature industrial economy toward the end of the century The spread of large scale mechanized production meant the availability of new consumer durables farm equipment sewing machines and other appliances that were almost but not quite within financial reach of the mass of the consuming public New credit practices like the installment plan helped to bridge the gap New

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/credit/credit4a.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Buy Now, Pay Later: Research Links - Manuscript Collections
    1795 1813 Collection Record Daniel Douglas a general storekeeper of Freetown Mass recorded his customer s credits and debits in this leather bound account book The account book is representative of business practices and bookkeeping techniques current in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries Baker Library Historical Collections contains numerous account books of small proprietors dating from the late seventeenth to the mid nineteenth centuries Dun Bradstreet Corporation Records 1831 1990 Collection Guide The Dun Bradstreet Corporation Records contain a vast array of materials that document the history and evolution of America s first credit reporting firm Coverage extends from the firm s first iteration as the Mercantile Agency then becoming B Douglass Co R G Dun Co and finally Dun Bradstreet A separate series covers the firm s biggest rival Bradstreet Co until the two firms merged in 1933 The records include correspondence legal financial administrative records and some visual material pertaining to the company R G Dun Co Credit Report Volumes 1840 1895 Collection Guide Guide to Using the Collection The collection contains 2 580 volumes of credit reports from the first American commercial reporting agency Reporters in the field initially collected information on the net worth duration of business source of wealth and character and reputation of individuals and firms Clerks copied the information much abbreviated into the ledgers which were organized by state and then by county The collection is notable as a source for social history as well as business history small entrepreneurs many of them women African Americans or recent immigrants are extensively covered Hancock Family Papers 1712 1854 Collection Guide The business papers of Boston s Hancock family contain many examples of the credit instruments that early American merchants devised to circumvent the scarcity of cash in the colonial economy The collection

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/credit/credit5a.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Buy Now, Pay Later: Credits
    J Gunnar Trumbull Associate Professor of Business Administration Harvard Business School Exhibit Staff Priscilla Anderson Katherine Fox Mary French Benjamin Johnson Laura Linard Tim Mahoney Melissa Murphy Christine Riggle Abigail Thompson Editing Julia Collins Katherine Fox Catalog Design Eleanor Bradshaw EB Fine Design Website Design Production Aaron Carmisciano Subluxed Cliff Moreland Knowledge and Library Services Harvard Business School Digital Photography Boston Photo Imaging Printing Ram Printing Inc Lenders to the

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/credit/credit6a.html (2016-02-18)
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  • A New Vision – The Human Relations Movement – Baker Library | Bloomberg Center, Historical Collections
    on the question of the link between financial incentives and output the Hawthorne researchers found that a worker might feel rewarded if she had pleasant associations with her co workers and that this might mean more to her than a little extra money Indeed the researchers found that many workers resisted incentive plans because they felt they would be competing against people whose good will and companionship they valued To take another example of the broader conception of human beings uncovered by the researchers consider for instance an entry about a test room operator who was asked If given three wishes what would they be Health to take a trip home at Christmas time and to take a wedding trip to Norway next spring she replied By noting these and other responses the researchers highlighted that their conceptual blurring of person and organization was not a weak surrender of the possibility of applying science to administration but an actual scientific working through of the nature of human behavior based on careful empirical observation A second definition of vision is when one talks about a vision of the future Here vision operates in the realm of possibility not actuality creating in effect a new vocabulary of human motives Confronted with the chaos and human suffering of the Depression even the most avowed scientific scholars like Roethlisberger and his colleagues felt a moral imperative to identify what the right pattern of an society should be Like most great researchers the possibility for developing an imaginative reordering of life through the careful observation of a subject was part of the original impulse for why they studied these workers for so long Consequently we must ask what did they hope to gain in the way of describing the patterns of organizations as systems and human beings with sentiments and connections As Fritz Roethlisberger later revealed in his autobiography his aim as well as that of Elton Mayo and others working in the organizations group at Harvard Business School was nothing less than an absolute commitment to lessen the gap between the possibilities grasped and the actualities illuminated through the application of theory and careful observation Whereas scientific management made the simplification of work and the indifference of workers to anything but a financial reward seem almost both inevitable and desirable the Hawthorne researchers identified that much of what individuals found meaningful in work was their association with others The economic rewards of work were potentially picayune compared to the feeling of solidarity and worth created among individuals working together toward a common end A manager s effectiveness therefore could be measured on the extent to which those in the organization internalized a common purpose and perceived the connection between their actions and the organization s ability to fulfill this common purpose Management then was not about controlling human behavior but unleashing human possibility By viewing the organization as a rationally engineered machine scientific management had perverted the social character of work and thereby negated

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/hawthorne/anewvision.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Guides to Archival Collections – The Human Relations Movement – Baker Library | Bloomberg Center, Historical Collections
    biochemistry and in history of science as well as the doctoral program in the history of science and learning His papers include memos correspondence lecture notes speeches reviews certificates and financial records as well as documentation regarding the effects of fatigue on productivity and the need for cross disciplinary exchange in academia George F F Lombard Papers Online finding aid George Lombard s teaching and research interests focused on Human Relations and Organizational Behavior He taught courses at both Harvard College and Harvard Business School His office files cover his activities as administrator researcher and professor of Industrial Research and Human Relations at Harvard Business School from 1937 1990 Documentation includes correspondence minutes research materials teaching materials conference papers articles and administrative materials Elton Mayo Papers Online finding aid Elton Mayo became head of the new Department of Industrial Research at Harvard Business School in 1926 His papers contain personal correspondence articles and speeches notebooks from his student days at the University of Adelaide teaching notes and committee records from Harvard Business School correspondence with Harvard Business School dean Wallace Donham and materials regarding his interest in sociology philosophy anthropology and psychology Also included are interviews and reports on industrial relations and efficiency studies conducted at various locations as well as extensive documentation of his involvement in the Hawthorne Studies including correspondence interviews research reports and statistical analyses Fritz Roethlisberger Papers Online finding aid The papers of Fritz Jules Roethlisberger cover his activities as researcher and professor of Industrial Research and Human Relations at Harvard Business School from 1927 to 1974 Documentation associated with his role as a key member of the Hawthorne Studies includes extensive transcripts of interviews with employees at Western Electric as well as administrative files speeches writings and correspondence with colleagues on the project His papers

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/hawthorne/rl-guides.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Credits – The Human Relations Movement – Baker Library | Bloomberg Center, Historical Collections
    Melissa Burton and Sara Grant Web and Intranet Services Digital Photography Boston Photo Inc Imaging Services Harvard College Library Editing Karen Bailey Katherine Fox Joan K O Donnell Exhibition Design Chris Danemayer proun Design Exhibition staff Rachel Wise Priscilla Anderson Martha Kearsley Melissa Murphy Print Design Eleanor Bradshaw Mary Lee Kennedy Executive Director Knowledge and Library Services Laura Linard Director Historical Collections Baker Library Supported by the de Gaspé Beaubien

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/hawthorne/credits.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Bubbles, Panics & Crashes – Historical Collections – Harvard Business School
    an earlier particularly volatile century of economic history These four crises were so far reaching that they affected virtually everyone involved in the U S market economy Yet each was so complex that their causes and consequences remain subjects of debate generations later Baker Library holdings reveal the voices actions and experiences of individuals who played a role in precipitating a crisis those who suffered its ill effects and those

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/crises/intro.html (2016-02-18)
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  • Bubbles, Panics & Crashes – Historical Collections – Harvard Business School
    overvalued and both banks failed 3 Developments in banking compounded the crisis The money supply swelled when the Bank of the United States lost its charter and each of the nation s 850 banks could again issue banknotes a private form of currency with little restraint This paper money then depreciated rapidly when President Jackson s Specie Circular of 1836 mandated payment for government land in gold or silver Ten months later banks refused to redeem their notes in specie bringing commerce to a standstill New England escaped the worst of the crisis thanks to Boston s conservative banking establishment which led by the Suffolk Bank curbed the excesses of the rural banks 4 The 1837 crisis and the six year depression that followed had lasting effects on the American economy The credit ratings industry for example has its origins in the hard times of the late 1830s and early 1840s So many businesses failed that Lewis Tappan a prominent opponent of slavery founded a company that offered subscribers up to date and comprehensive credit information on the businesses in their communities Tappan s firm the Mercantile Agency built on his abolitionist connections to create a nationwide network of credit reporters that was the direct predecessor of today s credit ratings firms 5 The effects of the Panic of 1837 also were felt far from home Global trade with China factored into and was transformed by the crisis Rapid credit expansion and avid speculation in tea silk and other products of the Celestial Empire contributed to the failure of merchant houses from London to New York and Boston in the late 1830s In the aftermath of the crisis many New England traders like J P Cushing redirected their capital from the China trade to American railroads 6 Bray Hammond Banks

    Original URL path: http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/crises/1837.html (2016-02-18)
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