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  • HWS Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
    News Events Seen On the Web Students Department Prizes Majors and Minors Guide to Recommendation Letters Major Minor Audit Forms 3 2 Engineering First Year Advising Math Placement Info Some Of Our Work Programming Textbook Eck CS Theory Textbook Critchlow Eck Analysis Textbook Mitchell Belding Biostatistics Textbook Mitchell Other Publications Welcome to the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Lansing Hall 315 781 3586 bridgeman hws edu A combined Department

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/ (2016-02-07)
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  • Schedule of Courses for Spring 2016
    Analysis Textbook Mitchell Belding Biostatistics Textbook Mitchell Other Publications Courses for Spring 2016 Period 1 MWF 8 00 9 55 Math 110 Discovering in Mathematics Jacquelyn Rische Math 130 Calculus I Kevin Mitchell Lab Thursday 10 20 11 45 Math 131 Calculus II David Belding Lab Thursday 8 45 10 10 Period 2 MWF 9 05 10 00 Cpsc 124 Introductory Programming Carol Critchlow Lab Thursday 10 20 11 45 Math 130 Calculus I Joseph Rusinko Lab Thursday 8 45 10 10 Math 131 Calculus II Jacquelyn Rische Lab Tuesday 10 20 11 45 Period 3 MWF 10 10 11 05 CPSC 327 Data Structures and Algorithms Stina Bridgeman Math 130 Calculus I Yan Hao Lab Thursday 11 55 1 20 Math 331 Foundations of Analysis I David Belding Period 4 MWF 11 15 12 10 CPSC 124 Introductory Programming Carol Critchlow Lab Thursday 11 55 1 20 Math 130 Calculus I Yan Hao Lab Thursday 1 30 2 55 Math 204 Linear Algebra Kevin Mitchell Math 214 Applied Linear Algebra Joseph Rusinko Period 5 MWF 12 20 1 15 CPSC 120 Principles of Computer Science John Lsseter CPSC 226 Embedded Computing John Vaughn Period 6A MWF 1 25 2

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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    Seminar Schedule Spring 2016 This is the schedule of colloquia and seminars inthe Department of Mathematics and Computer Science for the Spring semester February 2016 Mathematics of Combinatorial and other Games Candidate s Talk Date Friday February 5 Time 4 00 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served at 3 45 Abstract People have been creating and playing games for millennia perhaps to satisfy our inherent drive for challenges that are fun and entertaining In this talk I will present the theory of two person games of perfect information starting from the classical game of Nim and other impartial games those where the players have the same set of moves available to partisan games like Chess and Go Mathematicians and computer scientists have studied models of game playing and have produced amazing results just last week a breakthrough was announced in championship level Go and I will also discuss some of these models Modeling in Mathematical Neuroscience Candidate s Talk Date Monday February 8 Time 4 30 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served at 4 15 Abstract Neuroscience is the study of the brain and nervous system In this talk I will discuss how mathematics can be

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaS16.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Math/CS Catalog Info
    students mathematics is popular as a second major or as a minor in combination with another major from any of the Colleges academic divisions To meet the challenges opportunities and responsibilities encountered after graduation mathematics majors are encouraged to obtain a broad but firm foundation in the discipline Majors acquire skill in the use of mathematical methods for dealing with problems from a variety of disciplines and complement these tools with some training in computer science The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers two disciplinary majors in mathematics B A and B S and a disciplinary minor in mathematics In addition to the specific courses listed below other courses such as bidisciplinary courses taught by members of the department may be approved by the department for credit toward a major To be counted toward the major or minor all courses must be passed with a grade of C or better the department strongly recommends courses be taken on a graded rather than a credit no credit basis The department also gives credit for one course toward the major for a score of four or five on an Advanced Placement test in calculus or in programming A student can double major in mathematics and computer science by completing the requirements for each major ABOUT COMPUTER SCIENCE Computers are becoming an increasingly integral part of today s society and understanding how to effectively use the power of computing is likewise becoming increasingly important The study of computer science also promotes rigorous thinking and problem solving ability beneath the technical knowledge necessary for working with computers computer science is at its core very much the study of how to solve problems Many students who major in computer science go on to graduate school or to work in related professions For other students computer science is popular as a second major or as a minor in combination with another major from any of the Colleges academic divisions Regardless of field students often find that the skills they have gained studying computer science are highly sought after by employers To meet the challenges opportunities and responsibilities encountered after graduation computer science majors are encouraged to obtain a broad but firm foundation in the discipline In a rapidly growing and changing field the department offers a range of courses that enable majors to use modern technology to understand its applications across a broad range of disciplines and to understand the fundamental and enduring principles underlying those applications The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers two disciplinary majors in computer science B A and B Sc and a disciplinary minor in computer science In addition to the specific courses listed below other courses such as bidisciplinary courses taught by members of the department may be approved by the department for credit toward a major To be counted toward the major or minor all courses must be passed with a grade of C or better the department strongly recommends courses be taken on a graded rather

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  • Mathmatics Course Descriptions
    offers an introduction to the theory solution techniques and applications of ordinary differential equations Models illustrating applications in the physical and social sciences are investigated The mathematical theory of linear differential equations is explored in depth Prerequisites MATH 232 and MATH 204 or permission of the instructor Offered annually Typical reading Edwards and Penney Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems 278 Number Theory This course couples reason and imagination to consider a number of theoretic problems some solved and some unsolved Topics include divisibility primes congruences number theoretic functions primitive roots quadratic residues and quadratic reciprocity with additional topics selected from perfect numbers Fermat s Theorem sums of squares and Fibonacci numbers Prerequisites MATH 131 and MATH 204 or permission of the instructor Offered every third year Typical reading Burton Elementary Number Theory 313 Graph Theory A graph is an ordered pair V E where V is a set of elements called vertices and E is a set of unordered pairs of elements of V called edges This simple definition can be used to model many ideas and applications While many of the earliest records of graph theory relate to the studies of strategies of games such as chess mathematicians realized that graph theory is powerful well beyond the realm of recreational activity In class we will begin by exploring the basic structures of graphs including connectivity subgraphs isomorphisms and trees Then we will investigate some of the major results in areas of graph theory such as traversability coloring and planarity Course projects may also research other areas such as independence and domination Offered occasionally Typical reading Chartrand and Zhang Introduction to Graph Theory 331 Foundations of Analysis I This course offers a careful treatment of the definitions and major theorems regarding limits continuity differentiability integrability sequences and series for functions of a single variable Prerequisites MATH 135 and MATH 204 Offered annually Typical reading Belding and Mitchell Foundations of Analysis 332 Foundations of Analysis II This course begins with a generalization of the notions of limit continuity and differentiability developed in MATH 331 and extends them to the two dimensional setting Next the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus is extended to line integrals and then to Green s Theorem The course culminates with a brief introduction to analysis in the complex plane Prerequisites MATH 232 and MATH 331 Offered occasionally Typical reading Belding and Mitchell Foundations of Analysis 350 Probability This is an introductory course in probability with an emphasis on the development of the student s ability to solve problems and build models Topics include discrete and continuous probability random variables density functions distributions the Law of Large Numbers and the Central Limit Theorem Prerequisite MATH 232 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years Typical reading Ross A First Course in Probability 351 Mathematical Statistics This is a course in the basic mathematical theory of statistics It includes the theory of estimation hypothesis testing and linear models and if time permits a brief introduction to one or more further

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  • Computer Science Course Descriptions
    projects are emphasized such as designing building and programming a microprocessor controlled mobile robot Prerequisites CPSC 225 or permission of the instructor Offered alternate years 229 Fundamentals of Computation This course introduces students to some of the mathematical and theoretical foundations of computer science and to their practical applications to computing Topics include propositional and predicate logic sets and functions formal languages finite automata regular expressions grammars and Turing machines CPSC 229 is a required course for the major in computer science Prerequisite CPSC 124 Offered annually 271 Topics in Computer Science Each time this course is offered it addresses a topic in computer science that is not covered as a regular course The topic is covered at a level that is appropriate for any student who has successfully completed an introductory programming course Possible topics include web programming human computer interaction and Linux system and server administration This course may be repeated for credit by permission of the department Prerequisite CPSC 124 or permission of the instructor Offered alternate years 327 Data Structures and Algorithms This course continues the study of data structures and algorithms focusing on algorithm design and analysis and the relationships between data representation algorithm design and program efficiency Topics include advanced data structures key algorithm design techniques analysis of the time and space requirements of algorithms and characterizing the difficulty of solving a problem Concrete examples will be drawn from a variety of domains such as algorithms for graphs and networks cryptography data compression strings geometric problems indexing and search numerical problems and parallel computation This course is required for the major in computer science Prerequisites CPSC 225 CPSC 229 is recommended Offered annually 329 Software Development This course continues the study of programming by focusing on software design development and verification the skills beyond fluency in a particular language which are necessary for developing large reliable programs Topics include object oriented design the use of APIs and testing and verification Techniques common in modern software development will also be studied Specific techniques may include GUIs and event driven programming multi threading client server networking fault tolerant computing stream programming and security This course is required for the major in computer science It includes a required lab component Prerequisite CPSC 225 Offered annually 336 Robotics An advanced study of the electronics mechanics sensors and programming of robots Emphasis is placed on programming robots which investigate analyze and interact with the environment Topics may include mobile robots legged robots computer vision and various approaches to robot intelligence Prerequisite CPSC 226 or permission of the instructor Offered alternate years 343 Database Theory and Practice Computer databases are used to store organize and retrieve large collections of information This course introduces the theory and practice of relational databases and relational database management systems RDBMS Topics include data modeling and database design the relational algebra and relational calculus SQL and elements of RDBMS implementation such as file structure and data storage indexing and query evaluation Additional topics may include

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  • HWS Math and CS Faculty
    Department Chair Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 2001 Ph D Vanderbilt University 2002 M S Vanderbilt University 1998 A B Smith College 1995 Telephone 315 781 3355 Office 304 Lansing Hall David Belding Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 1980 Ph D Dartmouth 1980 M A Vermont 1974 A B Amherst 1971 Telephone 315 781 3618 Office 307 Lansing Hall Stina Bridgeman Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 2004 Ph D Brown University 2002 M S Brown University 1999 B A Williams 1995 Telephone 315 781 3614 Office 312 Lansing Hall Carol Critchlow Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 1991 Ph D Cornell 1991 M S Cornell 1990 B A Amherst 1985 Telephone 315 781 3617 Office 301 5 Lansing Hall David Eck Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 1986 Ph D Brandeis University 1980 M A Brandeis University 1977 B S Allentown College 1975 Telephone 315 781 3398 Office 313 Lansing Hall Jonathan Forde Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 2007 Ph D University of Michigan 2005 B S University of Texas Austin 2000 B A Univsity of Texas Austin 2000 Telephone 315 781 3814 Office 303 Lansing Hall Yan Hao Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 2012 Ph D The College of William and Mary 2011 M S The College of William and Mary 2009 B S Tsinghua University 2006 Telephone 315 781 3595 Office 306 Lansing Hall John Lasseter Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 2013 Ph D University of Oregon 2006 M Sc University of Oregon 1998 B A Earlham College 1992 Telephone Office 300 Lansing Hall Kevin Mitchell Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 1980 Ph D Brown 1980 A B Bowdoin 1975 Telephone 315 781 3619 Office 305 Lansing Hall Jacquelyn Rische Visiting Professor of Mathematics

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  • Math/CS at HWS
    3 2 Engineering First Year Advising Math Placement Info Some Of Our Work Programming Textbook Eck CS Theory Textbook Critchlow Eck Analysis Textbook Mitchell Belding Biostatistics Textbook Mitchell Other Publications Erika L C King Associate Professor and Chair of the Department Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Hobart and William Smith Colleges Mailing address Hobart and William Smith Colleges 300 Pulteney Street Geneva New York 14456 Office Office Phone Fax

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