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  • Math Placement Test
    before attempting the test Y OU should not use a calculator mathematical software course notes textbooks the Internet or any additional materials or aids while taking the test You can use scrap paper to work out solutions Submission of the test indicates that you have not received help from anyone nor used any other aids during the test Note that you must answer all 30 questions before you can finish

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/placement/ (2016-02-07)
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  • Math Placement Test Information
    math course at Hobart and William Smith Colleges Students have a variety of backgrounds and goals and these determine which courses are suitable for particular students Math 100 Elementary Functions This is a pre calculus course that is designed to help students prepare to take calculus It is recommended only for students who are planning to take Math 130 Calculus I and who need to improve their skills before doing so Students who score below 20 on the Math Placement Test are advised to take Math 100 before taking Math 130 Students who score 20 or just a little higher might also consider taking Math 100 if they are not confident in their math skills Math 100 involves the study of basic functions polynomial rational exponential logarithmic and trigonometric Topics covered include a review of the real number system equations and inequalities graphing techniques and applications of functions If a student needs to take this course it is advisable to take it in the semester just before taking Calculus I Math 110 Discovering in Mathematics This course is designed to bring some of the experience of doing math to students who are not planning to major or minor in mathematics It is a study of selected topics dealing with the nature of mathematics with an emphasis on its origins and a focus on mathematics as a creative endeavor Math 110 is often taken by students in the education program to fulfill their mathematics requirement Note that this is a high demand course and entering first year students are generally discouraged from trying to enroll in it Math 130 Calculus I This is the first of two courses in the basic calculus sequence It covers the differential calculus that is the derivative and its applications This course is required for the

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/placement/info.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Javanotes 7.0 Preface
    the very beginning This is not the approach that I take The approach that I favor starts with the more basic building blocks of programming and builds from there After an introductory chapter I cover procedural programming in Chapters 2 3 and 4 Object oriented programming is introduced in Chapter 5 Chapter 6 covers the closely related topic of event oriented programming and graphical user interfaces Arrays are introduced in Chapter 3 with a full treatment in Chapter 7 Chapter 8 is a short chapter that marks a turning point in the book moving beyond the fundamental ideas of programming to cover more advanced topics Chapter 8 is about writing robust correct and efficient programs Chapters 9 and 10 cover recursion and data structures including the Java Collection Framework Chapter 11 is about files and networking Chapter 12 covers threads and parallel processing Finally Chapter 13 returns to the topic of graphical user interface programming to cover some of Java s more advanced capabilities The Seventh Edition of Introduction to Programming using Java is not a huge update from the sixth edition In fact my main motivation for the new version was to remove any use of applets or coverage of applets from the book Applets are Java programs that run on a web page When Java first came out they were exciting and it seemed like they would become a major way of creating active content for the Web Up until the sixth edition the web pages for this book included applets for running many of the sample programs However because of security issues and the emergence of other technologies applets are no longer widely used Furthermore the most recent versions of Java made it fairly difficult and unpleasant to use the applets in the book In place of applets I have tried to make it as easy as possible for readers to download the sample programs and run them on their own computers Another significant change in the seventh edition is that arrays are now introduced in Chapter 3 in a basic form that is used throughout the next three chapters Previously arrays were not introduced until Chapter 7 after objects and GUI programming had already been covered Much of the more advanced coverage of arrays is still in Chapter 7 Aside from that there are many small improvements throughout mostly related to features that were new in Java 7 The latest complete edition of Introduction to Programming using Java is available on line at http math hws edu javanotes The first version of the book was written in 1996 and there have been several editions since then All editions are archived at the following Web addresses First edition http math hws edu eck cs124 javanotes1 Covers Java 1 0 Second edition http math hws edu eck cs124 javanotes2 Covers Java 1 1 Third edition http math hws edu eck cs124 javanotes3 Covers Java 1 1 Fourth edition http math hws edu eck cs124 javanotes4 Covers Java 1

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  • Javanotes Source Code
    section Section 12 1 runs one or more threads that all perform the same task to demonstrate that they run simultaneously and finish in an indeterminate order ThreadTest2 java from section Section 12 1 divides up a task counting primes among several threads to demonstrate parallel processing and the use of synchronization DateServerWithThreads java and DateServerWithThreadPool java from Section 12 4 are modifications of chapter11 DateServer java Subsection 11 4 4 that use threads to handle communication with clients The first program creates a new thread for each connection The second uses a thread pool and it uses a blocking queue to send connections from the main program to the pool The threaded servers will work with original client program chapter11 DateClient java CLMandelbrotMaster java CLMandelbrotWorker java and CLMandelbrotTask java from Section 12 4 are a demonstration of distributed computing in which pieces of a large computation are sent over a network to be computed by worker programs Part 2 Graphical Examples from the Text The following sample programs use a graphical user interface GUIDemo java is a simple demonstration of some basic GUI components from the Swing graphical user interface library It appears in the text in Section 1 6 but you won t be able to understand it until you learn about GUI programming RandomCircles java from Section 3 9 draws a large number of randomly colored randomly positioned disks his simple graphics program is our first example of a GUI program It is meant both as an introduction to graphics and as an example of using control structures MovingRects java from Section 3 9 draws a set of nested rectangles that seem to move infinitely towards the center Both this program and the previous one are based on SimpleAnimationStarter java which can be used as a starting point for writing similar programs RandomMosaicWalk java a standalone program that displays a window full of colored squares with a moving disturbance from Section 4 6 This program depends on MosaicPanel java and Mosaic java RandomMosaicWalk2 java is a version of the previous example modified to use a few named constants From Section 4 7 GrowingCircleAnimation java from Section 5 3 shows an animation of growing semi transparent circles Requires CircleInfo java Used as a simple example of programming with object ShapeDraw java from Section 5 5 is a program that lets the user place various shapes on a drawing area an example of abstract classes subclasses and polymorphism HelloWorldGUI1 java and HelloWorldGUI2 java from Section 6 1 show the message Hello World in a window the first one by using the built in JOptionPane class and the second by building the interface by hand SimpleColorChooser jav used in Section 6 2 to demonstrate RGB and HSB colors This program uses techniques that are not covered until later in the text and it is not presented as a programming example You can run it to experiment with colors RandomStringsPanel java from Section 6 2 shows 25 copies of the string Java or some other string specified in it constructor in random colors and fonts The program RandomStrings java uses a RandomStringsPanel as its content pane And RandomStringsPanelWithMain java is a program that combines the main routine and the definition of the panel into one file Finally ClickableRandomStrings java from Section 6 3 is a modification of RandomStrings java with a mouse listener that redraws the panel when the user clicks on it SimpleStamper java from Section 6 3 lets the user place rectangles and ovals on a drawing area by clicking with the mouse SimpleTrackMouse java from Section 6 3 shows information about mouse events as the user moves and clicks with the mouse SimplePaint java from Section 6 3 lets the user draw curves in a drawing area and select the drawing color from a palette RandomArt java from Section 6 4 shows a new random artwork every four seconds This is an example of using a Timer KeyboardAndFocusDemo java from Section 6 4 shows how to use keyboard and focus events SubKiller java from Section 6 4 lets the user play a simple arcade style game Uses a timer as well as keyboard and focus events SliderDemo java and TextAreaDemo java small programs that demonstrate basic components used as examples in Section 6 5 BorderDemo java and BorderDemo java from Section 6 6 a very simple program that demonstrates six types of border SliderAndButtonDemo java from Section 6 6 shows how to create several components and lay them out in a GridLayout SimpleCalc java from Section 6 6 lets the user add subtract multiply or divide two numbers input by the user A demo of text fields buttons and layout with nested subpanels NullLayoutDemo java from Section 6 6 shows how to lay out the components in a container for which the layout manager has been set to null HighLowGUI java from Section 6 6 implements a GUI version of the card game HighLow java in which the user sees a playing card and guesses whether the next card will be higher or lower in value This program depends on Card java Hand java and Deck java MosaicDraw java from Section 6 7 demonstrates menus and a color chooser dialog This is used in a program where the user colors the squares of a mosaic by clicking and dragging the mouse It uses MosaicPanel java to define the mosaic panel itself and it uses MosaicDrawController java to create the panel and menu bar and to handle events SimpleDialogDemo java from Section 6 7 is a small program that demonstrates JColorChooser and some dialogs from JOptionPane RandomStringsWithArray java from Section 7 2 shows multiple copies of a message in random colors sizes and positions This is an improved version of RandomStringsPanel java that uses an array to keep track of the data so that the same picture can be redrawn whenever necessary SimplePaint2 java from Section 7 3 lets the user draw colored curves and stores the data needed

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/javanotes/source/index.html (2016-02-07)
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  • name are identical and you only need one copy of the file in your project COMPILE AND RUN ON THE COMMAND LINE If you know how to compile programs on the command line and if you have downloaded the examples you can easily compile and run all the examples Just change into one of the chapter directories inside sources and use the command javac java to compile all the examples from that chapter As long as your compiler supports Java 7 or higher there should be no errors You might see some warnings especially if you use a newer version of java but warnings do not stop a program from being compiled or executed You can then run individual programs using the java command For example java HelloWorld Several examples from Chapter 12 Section 5 and the Mandelbrot Set example from Chapter 13 Section 5 use packages The source files for these examples can be found in the directories chapter12 netgame and chapter13 edu Compiling and running programs from packages is a little harder see the discussions in the textbook in the relevant sections MAKE EXECUTABLE JAR FILES If you find it easier to run programs by double clicking you can can use executable jar files to run the examples but you need to create them If you are running Mac or Linux just open a Terminal window and change into the sources directory Run the script named make jar files sh To run it just use the command make jar files sh If you are running Windows just open a DOS command window and change into the sources directory Run the script named make jar files bat To run it just use the command make jar files bat These commands build all the executable jar files for the examples

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/javanotes/README-running-the-examples.txt (2016-02-07)
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  • Javanotes 7.0 Table of Contents
    and super 5 6 1 The Special Variable this 5 6 2 The Special Variable super 5 6 3 super and this As Constructors Section 5 7 Interfaces 5 7 1 Defining and Implementing Interfaces 5 7 2 Interfaces as Types 5 7 3 Interfaces in Java 8 Section 5 8 Nested Classes 5 8 1 Static Nested Classes 5 8 2 Inner Classes 5 8 3 Anonymous Inner Classes 5 8 4 Java 8 Lambda Expressions Programming Exercises Quiz Chapter 6 Introduction to GUI Programming Section 6 1 The Basic GUI Application 6 1 1 JFrame and JPanel 6 1 2 Components and Layout 6 1 3 Events and Listeners 6 1 4 Some Java GUI History Section 6 2 Graphics and Painting 6 2 1 Coordinates 6 2 2 Colors 6 2 3 Fonts 6 2 4 Shapes 6 2 5 Graphics2D 6 2 6 An Example 6 2 7 Where is main Section 6 3 Mouse Events 6 3 1 Event Handling 6 3 2 MouseEvent and MouseListener 6 3 3 MouseEvent Data 6 3 4 MouseMotionListeners and Dragging 6 3 5 Anonymous Event Handlers and Adapter Classes Section 6 4 Timers KeyEvents and State Machines 6 4 1 Timers and Animation 6 4 2 Keyboard Events 6 4 3 Focus Events 6 4 4 State Machines Section 6 5 Basic Components 6 5 1 JButton 6 5 2 JLabel 6 5 3 JCheckBox 6 5 4 JTextField and JTextArea 6 5 5 JSlider Section 6 6 Basic Layout 6 6 1 Basic Layout Managers 6 6 2 Borders 6 6 3 SliderAndButtonDemo 6 6 4 A Simple Calculator 6 6 5 Using a null Layout 6 6 6 A Little Card Game Section 6 7 Menus and Dialogs 6 7 1 Menus and Menubars 6 7 2 Dialogs 6 7 3 Fine Points of Frames 6 7 4 Creating Jar Files Programming Exercises Quiz Chapter 7 Arrays and ArrayLists Section 7 1 Array Details 7 1 1 For each Loops 7 1 2 Variable Arity Methods 7 1 3 Array Literals Section 7 2 Array Processing 7 2 1 Some Processing Examples 7 2 2 Some Standard Array Methods 7 2 3 RandomStrings Revisited 7 2 4 Dynamic Arrays Section 7 3 ArrayList 7 3 1 ArrayList and Parameterized Types 7 3 2 Wrapper Classes 7 3 3 Programming With ArrayList 7 3 4 Vectors Section 7 4 Searching and Sorting 7 4 1 Searching 7 4 2 Association Lists 7 4 3 Insertion Sort 7 4 4 Selection Sort 7 4 5 Unsorting Section 7 5 Two dimensional Arrays 7 5 1 The Truth About 2D Arrays 7 5 2 Conway s Game Of Life 7 5 3 Checkers Programming Exercises Quiz Chapter 8 Correctness Robustness Efficiency Section 8 1 Introduction to Correctness and Robustness 8 1 1 Horror Stories 8 1 2 Java to the Rescue 8 1 3 Problems Remain in Java Section 8 2 Writing Correct Programs 8 2 1 Provably Correct

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  • Javanotes 7.0, Chapter 1 -- Overview: The Mental Landscape
    in the Java programming language you ll want to know something about that language in particular and about the modern computing environment for which Java is designed As you read this chapter don t worry if you can t understand everything in detail In fact it would be impossible for you to learn all the details from the brief expositions in this chapter Concentrate on learning enough about the big

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/javanotes/c1/index.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Javanotes 7.0, Chapter 2 -- Programming in the Small I: Names and Things
    the overall structure of a program is what I call programming in the large Programming in the small which is sometimes called coding would then refer to filling in the details of that design The details are the explicit step by step instructions for performing fairly small scale tasks When you do coding you are working close to the machine with some of the same concepts that you might use in machine language memory locations arithmetic operations loops and branches In a high level language such as Java you get to work with these concepts on a level several steps above machine language However you still have to worry about getting all the details exactly right This chapter and the next examine the facilities for programming in the small in the Java programming language Don t be misled by the term programming in the small into thinking that this material is easy or unimportant This material is an essential foundation for all types of programming If you don t understand it you can t write programs no matter how good you get at designing their large scale structure The last section of this chapter discusses programming environments That section contains

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