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  • Majoring in Math or Computer Science
    Math 110 Math 111 Math 112 and Cpsc 100 However a student can count one of these courses towards a major in mathematics or computer science provided that course is the first course he or she takes in the department To be counted towards a major or minor in mathematics or computer science a course must be passed with a minimum grade of C the department strongly recommends that such courses be taken on a graded rather than a credit no credit basis The program required for a major in mathematics or computer science is the one listed in the catalogue for the year in which the student declares the major However no course that was acceptable at the time it was taken will be retroactively disallowed MATHEMATICS A major in mathematics consists of fourteen courses in the department with exceptions as explained above The following six courses are required unless exempted by previous experience Math 130 Calculus I Math 131 Calculus II Math 132 Calculus III Math 204 Linear Algebra Math 331 Foundations of Analysis I and Math 375 Abstract Algebra I The major must also include two additional mathematics courses at the 300 or 400 level The following computer science courses can be counted as electives towards a mathematics major Cpsc 124 125 221 227 322 324 329 and 371 Many students who major in mathematics go on to study mathematics in graduate school or to work in mathematically oriented professions But mathematics has always been one of the core subjects of a liberal arts education As a subject that develops rigorous thinking and problem solving ability it is very popular as a double major or a minor in combination with fields from all three of the Colleges academic divisions To meet the challenges opportunities and responsibilities which

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  • The Most Complex Machine
    all the programs for The Most Complex Machine to Java January 5 1996 I have posted the program xComputer including documentation and examples as a separate package See the downloading page September 14 1995 Hobart and William Smith Colleges have upgraded their connection to the Internet from 56Kbps to 128Kbps This means that downloading speed from this server should be improved August 15 1995 The Most Complex Machine is now in print Published by A K Peters Wellesley Massachusetts ISBN number 1 56881 054 7 August 3 1995 I have posted the program xTuringMachine as a separate package including documentation for downloading It joins xSortLab xLogicCircuits and the two xModels programs July 16 1995 I have written the final three of fifteen labs so the Lab Manual for Macintosh is complete and available for downloading from the downloading page About The Most Complex Machine If you would like to know more about the book you can read The Preface The Table of Contents Short chapter summaries And when you decide you ve got to have the book here is an order form but note that the book won t actually be published until July Software and Lab Worksheets Programs for Macintosh computer and lab worksheets are available for downloading For more infomation see A list of programs with a short descrition of each Short Summaries of all the labs More about how to download the software and labs Information for CS 100 Computer Science 100 Principles of Computer Science is the course in which I use The Most Complex Machine This information was put here mostly for the benefit of students who were taking that course which is now over Information for Spring 96 The course handout describing the course the schedule of tests grading policies etc Weekly Guides An

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  • New MacHTTP Home Page
    the MacHTTP Home Page run by BIAP Systems Inc for information about MacHTTP The MacHTTP Home Page contains the latest MacHTTP software versions examples tools announcements and links to other MacHTTP related sites Check here often MacHTTP Talk Mailing List The MacHTTP Talk Mailing List is the primary support forum for MacHTTP Users from all over the planet gather here to discuss the care and feeding of MacHTTP Support for Registered Users Registered users can always obtain support directly from BIAP Systems Inc by sending e mail to support biap com Be sure to send your license number as part of any correspondence Documentation Resources The Documentation folder contains important information about MacHTTP The MacHTTP technical reference release notes and a Questions and Answer list can be found there Tutorial Information Several detailed tutorials are available that describe how to use some of the more complicated features of MacHTTP in step by step detail All of this information is contained in the Tutorials folder Tools and Utilities for use with MacHTTP There are many tools and utilities that make working with MacHTTP easier The Tools html file in the Documentation folder lists a few of them and has pointers to

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  • John Vaughn's Home Page: College Stuff
    outskirts of Tokyo during International Week There we had a chance to exchange ideas with our hosts and experience different educational environments All too soon it was time to return home but the memories will always remain Current Happenings CPSC 226 Computer Architecture Winter term 1996 Text Mobile Robots Inspiration to Implementation by Jones and Flynn Published by A K Peters inc Topics in this class will be basic logic circuits microprocessors assembly language programming along with building mobile robots as a reality check We have now passed through the vale of tears usually called digital logic and are steaming on to our encounter with Rug Warrior No cause for alarm RW is just a small extremely non lethal autonomous robot whose design is found in the Jones and Flynn text My daughter has named mine Fred Anyway we will be building RWs and programming them to play tag avoid obstacles and generally act out the role of electronic beetles Check out this book you will like the easy introduction to microprocessor controlled robots You can order RW as a kit from A K Peters as well or take the plunge and collect the parts and assemble it all yourself CPSC 124 Pascal Programming I Winter term 1996 Text Oh Pascal by Doug Cooper Published by Norton Books We are plunging along with the syntax and semantics of Pascal Programming exercises are done in Think Pascal on Power Mac 7100 machines We have computed wind chill values brrrrrr drawn some logos in character graphics composed a simple animation using Quickdraw and are heading into more loops arrays and files Along the way we are reading Being Digital by Nicholas Negroponte and Silicon Snake Oil by Cliff Stoll Stay tuned Math 450 Independent Study Topic Galois Theory Winter term 1996 Text

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  • Stack Machine Info for CPSC 328
    FloatSubtract sm FloatTimes and sm FloatDivide Two values are popped from the stack They are interpreted as floating point numbers The operation is performed and the floating point result is pushed back onto the stack sm FloatUnaryMinus sm FloatAbs sm Sin sm Cos sm Arctan sm Sqrt sm Ln and sm Exp A single value is popped from the stack It is interpreted as a floating point number The operation is perfromed and the floating point result is pushed back onto the stack sm Trunc and sm Round A single value is popped from the stack It is interpreted as a floating point number The operation is performed giving an integer result That integer is pushed back onto the stack sm Random Nothing is popped from the stack A random integer in the range from 2 15 to 2 15 1 is pushed onto the stack sm IntToFloat A number is popped from the stack It is interpreted as an integer That integer is converted to a floating point number which is pushed back onto the stack sm FirstOpIntToFloat Similar to sm IntToFloat except that the number on the top of the stack is not affected Instead the value one down from the top is converted from integer to floating point Logical Operators sm And sm Or and sm Not These operators pop values from the stack that are interpreted as logical values The number zero represents false Any other value represents true but when a logical value is computed the number one is used to represent true Sm and and sm or pop two values from the stack sm Not pops a single value The result is computed and pushed back onto the stack sm IntEQ sm IntNE sm IntGT sm IntLT sm IntGE and sm IntLE Two values are popped from the stack They are interpreted as integers The comparison is performed and the result 0 to represent false or 1 to represent true is pushed back onto the stack sm FloatEQ sm FloatNE sm FloatGT sm FloatLT sm FloatGE and sm FloatLE Two values are popped from the stack They are interpreted as floating point numbers The comparison is performed and the result 0 to represent false or 1 to represent true is pushed back onto the stack Input Output operators sm WriteInt Two numbers are popped from the stack The first number popped is interpreted as a field width The second is interpreted as an integer That integer is written to the I O window using the specified field width as in write n w sm WriteFloat Two numbers are popped from the stack The first number popped is interpreted as a field width The second is interpreted as a floating point number That number is written to the I O window using the specified field width as in write X w sm WriteDecimal Three numbers are popped from the stack The first is interpreted as the number of decimal places desired in the output The second is interpreted as a field width The third is interpreted as a floating point number That number is written to the I O window using the specified field width as in write X w d sm WriteString A value is popped from the stack It is interpreted as a string descriptor The string is specifies is written to the I O window sm WriteChar A value is popped from the stack It is interpreted as the ASCII code of a character That character is written to the I O window sm WriteBoolean A value is popped from the stack It is interpreted as a logical value 0 representing false and anything else representing true The appropriate Boolean constant TRUE or FALSE is written to the I O window sm WriteNewLine Nothing is popped from the stack An end of line is written to the I O window sm Readln Has the same effect as a readln command in Pascal That is reads up to and including the next end of line encountered in input sm FillBuffer sm FlushBuffer You probably won t need these since they don t correspond directly to things in Pascal sm FillBuffer waits for the user to type in a line an puts it into the internal input buffer Sm FlushBuffer empties that buffer Nothing is popped from the stack sm Eoln Pushs a logical value 0 or 1 onto the stack indicating whether and end of line is the next character waiting to be read in the input buffer sm ReadInt Tries to read an integer from input and pushes the number read onto the stack May cause a run time error sm ReadFloat Tries to read a floating point number from input and pushes the number read onto the stack May cause a run time error sm ReadChar Reads a character from input and pushes it that is its ASCII code onto the stack sm LookChar Looks at the next character to be read from input and pushes it onto the stack without removing it from the input buffer Structure of the Stack Machine The stack machine that you will be using in this course has two major components the Main Memory and the I O Window It also has a few other pieces a Top of stack Register a Base Register and an I O Buffer and a String Storage Area The I O Buffer and I O Window are used by the stack machine s input output operators and you don t really need to know anything more about them The stack machine also has a program which you can think of as being stored in a separate set of memory locations if you like The instructions in the program are numbered 0 1 2 3 and so forth Instruction numbers are used in jump and subroutine instructions The String Storage Area is just an array of characters The characters are numbered 0 1 2 3 and so forth Strings are

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  • Notes for CPSC 124: Java Programming, Main Index
    not claim credit for them or sell them without my permission Note If you are interested in downloading this on line text for use on your own computer see the links at the bottom of this page You might want to look at the labs that I used in the course These are available separately for download A second edition of this text covering Java 1 1 instead of Java 1 0 is now available for downloading and for use online Please see that version at http math hws edu eck cs124 notes Chapter Links Chapter 1 Overview The Mental Landscape Chapter 2 Programming in the Small Variables I O and Control Structures Chapter 3 Programming in the Large I Subroutines Chapter 4 Programming in the Large II Objects and Classes Chapter 5 Applets HTML and the Web Chapter 6 Components and Events Chapter 7 Arrays Chapter 8 Advanced Input Output and Exceptions Chapter 9 From Java to C Also Available Source code for applets in this on line text Tests and quizzes given during the Winter 1998 course based on these notes Quizes with answers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Tests with answers 1 and 2 Tests

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  • Notes for CPSC 124: Java Programming, Main Index
    edu eck cs124 A set of labs that were used in the course is available online at http math hws edu eck cs124 labs To learn more about this on line text including usage restrictions please read its preface This is the second edition of a text that was used previously in Fall 1996 and Winter 1998 This version uses Java 1 1 If you read this text with a Web browser that only supports Java 1 0 most of the applets in the text won t work See the preface for more information on Java 1 0 and Java 1 1 The first edition of this text which used Java 1 0 is still available at http math hws edu eck cs124 notes98 Short Table of Contents Full Table of Contents Preface Chapter 1 Overview The Mental Landscape Chapter 2 Programming in the Small Variables I O and Control Structures Chapter 3 Programming in the Large I Subroutines Chapter 4 Programming in the Large II Objects and Classes Chapter 5 Applets HTML and GUI s Chapter 6 Components and Events Chapter 7 Arrays and other Data Structures Chapter 8 Advanced Input Output and Exceptions Chapter 9 From Java to

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  • Java Programming, Main Index
    contained in the text require Java 1 1 or higher Links for downloading copies of this text can be found at the bottom of this page To learn more about this on line text please read its preface Search this Text Although this book does not have a conventional index you can search it for terms that interest you Note that this searches the version of the text book at its main site at math hws edu Search Introdution to Programming Using Java for pages Containing all of these words Containing any of these words Short Table of Contents Full Table of Contents Preface Preface to the Second Edition Chapter 1 Overview The Mental Landscape Chapter 2 Programming in the Small I Names and Things Chapter 3 Programming in the Small II Control Chapter 4 Programming in the Large I Subroutines Chapter 5 Programming in the Large II Objects and Classes Chapter 6 Applets HTML and GUI s Chapter 7 Advanced GUI Programming Chapter 8 Arrays Chapter 9 Correctness and Robustness Chapter 10 Advanced Input Output Chapter 11 Linked Data Structures and Recursion Appendix 1 From Java to C Appendix 2 Some Notes on Java Programming Environments Appendix 3 Source code for all examples in the text News and Errata This is a free textbook As of Version 3 1 it is published under the terms of the Open Publication License Version 1 0 The latest edition is always available at no charge for downloading and for on line use at the Web address http math hws edu javanotes This edition the third is also permanently archived at the address http math hws edu eck cs124 javanotes3 Downloading Links Use one of the following direct links to download a compressed archive of this entire textbook You can use this material

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