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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    14 and Gen Li H 14 Date Tuesday October 8 2013 Time 4 00 PM Location Stanford Room Library Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract The dynamics of real life friendship networks are of interest to sociologists and psychologists for decades however very few mathematical models have been set up to explain statistical data In this project we use Watts Strogatz and scale free random networks to model the dynamics of college friendships In these models we use time shared between friends as the major measurement for friendship wellness among college students Assuming between each pair of friends the obligation of helping each other is reciprocal and that unfulfilled requests harm friendships we quantitatively studied to what extend friendships can help college students de stress how long do college friendships last and more importantly whether keeping many friends is beneficial The Actuarial Career Who we are and what we do Speaker Vincent Cassano 91 Date Thursday October 31 2013 Time 4 45 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served at 4 30 Abstract Being an actuary is a challenging interesting and rewarding career path The presentation will give some examples of what actuaries do on a day to day basis the benefits of being an actuary and some resources for those interested in the actuarial profession He will also look at the pension field and comment on the state of retirement policy in the US November 2013 Software development at Markit Speaker Joe Howe 14 Date Wednesday November 6 Time 4 30 PM Location Napier Hall Room 201 Refreshments will be served before the talk at 4 15 Abstract Joe will share the experiences from his summer internship He will discuss what projects worked on while he was at Markit and how he interacted with other departments of the

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaF13.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    Location Napier 101 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract In the futuristic film Minority Report the main character attempts to evade police by walking through a mall Unfortunately sensors abound and he finds himself targeted not only by the police but also by advertisements The world where sensors can read your personal traits and identify you is here Today face and iris images are used Tomorrow s technology may use heartbeats Thoracic biometrics refers to the use of cardiac signals for identification These signals can be measured by sensors in contact with the body for example a stethoscope or at a distance with the use of lasers and radars In this talk we will discuss the state of the art in thoracic biometrics our human subject experiment for recording cardiac signals our biometric identification software and future work in thoracic biometrics Design Pattern Based Extension of Class Hierarchies to Support Structural Invariant Testing Candidate s Talk Date Thursday February 28 Time 5 00 PM Location Eaton 110 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract In object oriented programming a class invariant is a boolean valued predicate that characterizes an object s legal states stating the constraints that must hold among an object s fields Although it is a powerful testing tool most mainstream languages lack native support for expressing class invariants In such languages a programmer must build all checks of these invariants manually which is difficult tedious and prone to errors In this talk I will describe the results of a project recently completed with one of my students in which we develop a method for automatically weaving structural invariant checking into a set of classes Using variations on existing design patterns we generate from the original source code a new set of classes that implement the interfaces of the original classes but with the addition of user specified class invariant checks Our work is notable in the scarcity of assumptions made It requires no modification of the original source code relies only on single inheritance and does not require that the object fields used in the checks be publicly visible We are able to instrument a wide variety of class hierarchies including those with pure interfaces abstract classes and classes with type parameters April 2013 Failed Zero Forcing Sets in Graphs Speaker Professor Bonnie Jacob National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Insitute of Technology Date Tuesday April 9 Time 4 15 Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract Zero forcing which can be considered to be a dynamic vertex labeling problem is a helpful tool for working on minimum rank problems This is because the zero forcing number of a graph G which is the minimum cardinality of any zero forcing set on G provides an upper bound for the maximum nullity of the matrix associated with G The usefulness of zero forcing sets has led to a thorough investigation of zero forcing numbers on different families of graphs However there are many interesting

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaS13.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    can approve as many candidates as they like in a multicandidate election This is the system which has been adopted by the Mathematical Association of America MAA the American Mathematic Society AMS and several other professional societies Brams argues that this system is a much simpler and more practical option than the plurality U S voting system In addition he will discuss other systems such as ranking systems and grading systems which have been widely discussed in mathematical fields Brams will touch on the Electoral College system about which he has written extensively In fact Bram s opinions on the system were recently published by the New York Times in the editorial section and elicited an enthusiastic response from readers across the country Steven Brams is a professor of Politics at New York University He is the author co author or co editor of 17 books and more than 250 articles His books include Theory of Moves Cambridge 1994 and co authored with Alan D Taylor Fair Division From Cake Cutting to Dispute Resolution Cambridge 1996 and The Win Win Solution Guaranteeing Fair Shares to Everybody Norton 1999 His newest books are Mathematics and Democracy Designing Better Voting and Fair Division Procedures Princeton 2008 and Game Theory and the Humanities Bridging Two Worlds MIT 2011 Brams holds two patents for fair division algorithms The Win Win Solution Guaranteeing Fair Shares to Everybody Professor Steven Brams New York University Date Wednesday October 3 2012 Time 4 00 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract Cutting up a cake dividing up the property in an estate determining the border in an international dispute such problems of fair division are ubiquitous Beginning with I cut you choose I will will illustrate how rigorous methods can be applied to the analysis

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaF12.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    transmission for a population living in two locations cities towns or countries etc by generalizing the classic Kermack McKendrick SIR susceptible infectious recovered removed model to incorporate latency The model is given by a system of delay differential equations with a fixed delay accounting for the latency and non local terms caused by the mobility of the individuals during the latent period The model preserves some properties that the classic Kermack McKendrick SIR model possesses the disease always dies out leaving a certain portion of the susceptible population untouched called final sizes The ratio of the final sizes in the two locations is determined by the ratio of the dispersion rates of the susceptible individuals between the two locations We also show that the new model may have very rich patterns for the disease to die out E g unlike the classic SIR model it allows multiple outbreaks of the disease before it goes to extinction March 2012 How Randomness Controls Our Lives Candidate s Talk Date Monday March 5 2012 Time 5 00 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract Modeling and analysis of phenomena in the life sciences require techniques and tools from various disciplines Though deterministic models have been broadly used and proved to be a powerful tool in the study of mathematical biology stochastic models often complement them on capturing individual behavior and effects of noise molecular fluctuations and random environmental change for example In this talk I will present two examples to show when and how stochastic models can be applied to study biological problems In the first example an agent based model is used to study resource sharing rules among human populations under realistic ecological conditions and reveals that simple sharing is an effective risk reducing strategy that plays an important role in maintaining human populations In the second example Markov chains and stochastic differential equations are applied to model the dynamics of cardiac calcium that is crucial for cardiac rhythm regulation and is known to be the key to understanding many cardiac diseases Twists and Turns An Introduction to the Mapping Class Group Candidate s Talk Date Friday March 30 2012 Time 4 30 PM Location Eaton 110 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract The Mapping Class Group classifies continuous invertible functions from a surface to itself It is used by topologists to understand how 3 and 4 dimensional spaces are shaped and has many applications in other branches of mathematics The Mapping Class Group is easy to describe visually but its implications can be complicated and far reaching What exactly is this object Why is it so useful We will assume a willingness to draw pictures Illustrations of donuts will be provided April 2012 Continued Fractions A Tour Through The Ages Candidate s Talk Date Monday April 9 2012 Time 4 30 PM Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract We ll begin with the ancient division algorithm ascribed to Euclid which naturally leads to the notion

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaS12.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    bone has an annual turnover rate of about 10 percent Understanding the biochemical processes of bone remodeling is important to the development of treatments for the disease osteoporosis which is characterized by low bone mass and which puts those who have it at risk of bone fractures Osteoporosis results from an imbalance in the biochemical remodeling process when resorption the chemical breakdown of old bone outstrips the formation of new bone The most common cause of osteoporosis is age related hormone change the reduction of estrogen in women after menopause and the reduction of testosterone in older men Roughly 20 percent of women over the age of 50 have osteoporosis In this talk Professor Ross will discuss dynamical system models of bone remodeling that are used to simulate bone remodeling and to study the effects of various treatments for the condition He will focus on the ways in which the dynamical systems capture the important biochemical features of the remodeling process and he will discuss modeling methodology and the ways in which models are used November 2011 A Mathematical Model of T Cell Exhaustion Caused by HBV HDV Speaker Yaoxin Liu 12 Date Tuesday November 9th Time 4 30 pm Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract Abstract In patients with chronic hepatitis B infection the immune system becomes exhausted losing its effectiveness over time Co infection with another virus Hepatitis Delta reduces the amount of HBV in the blood and so may relieve the exhaustion During the Summer Research Program last summer Yixiao Sha Yaoxin Liu and Prof Jonathan Forde developed an ordinary differential equation model of the interactions of these two viruses and the immune system to study the effect of a second infection on immune exhaustion Sha Liu and Forde started by studying the four dimensional model with only HBV infection and then added the second virus HDV They also analyzed various steady states and their stability for both systems All the stability conditions are found for the four dimensional system with only HBV infection For the five dimensional system with HDV numerical simulations show the existence of positive steady states representing chronic coinfection The model suggests that co infection does not reduce the exhaustion level but increases damage due to general inflammation If Copernicus and Kepler Had Computers An Introduction to Model Building and Computational Science Speaker Charles Van Loan Cornell University Date Thursday November 17th Time 5 00pm Location Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract If you watch Mars against the backdrop of the fixed stars then night after night you ll see rather steady progress across the zodiac But every so often the planet appears to back up before continuing on its forward trek This periodic retrograde motion wreaks havoc with a model of the solar system that places each planet on a steadily rotating circle with Earth at the center Ptolemy did a pretty good job patching up the model by placing each planet on a small rotating circle

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaF11.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Colloquia and Seminars
    architecture A VIREOS Larc system can either be simulated or run on a pre configured FPGA The VIREOS project is well integrated with an introductory computer architecture course using Larc and the assignments are structured in a similar fashion using a bottom up approach The project includes several resources available on the Web which help reduce the overhead of adopting VIREOS Finally VIREOS has been used in one operating systems course already and overall it was well received by students A Basic Introduction to Knot Theory Speaker Adam Giambrone 08 Tuesday March 8th at 4 45pm Room Napier 201 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract The two main unsolved questions in the field of knot theory can be described as follows Given a knotted loop of rope is there a way to untie it to make the loop just a circle Given two knots is there a way to deform the first knot to turn it into the second knot The goal of this talk will be to introduce the field of knot theory to a general audience beginning from the most basic foundations After defining what a knot is he will describe how to represent a knot by a two dimensional diagram in the plane and also describe what it means for two knots to be the same Giambrone will then describe the idea of using knot invariants to tell knots apart and if time permits he will define the property of knot tricolorability and sketch the proof that this property is actually a specific type of knot invariant Fractals The rough and rugged curves they don t teach in calculus Speaker Dr Jamison Wolf Friday March 25th at 4 15pm Room Gulick 206A Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract The term fractal is often used to describe a set of points that can be obtained through some recursive procedure Such a set of points could comprise a line or a surface or could be a disconnected dust The recursive procedure repeats on every level of the construction which tends to create patterns that are visible at every level of magnification Fractals also tend to have some rather bizarre properties that are almost paradoxical For example the von Koch curve has an infinite length yet the entire curve can be drawn inside a square of width one This talk introduces some of the core concepts and applications of fractals by discussing several examples ranging from the classic Cantor set to the more general random fractals Model Theory and Definite Forms An Elegant Solution to an Old Problem Speaker Dr Laurel Miller Sims Tuesday March 29th at 4 15pm Room Napier 101 Refreshments will be served beforehand Abstract A rational function F x p x q x is said to be positive definite if F x 0 for all real numbers x These functions were of interest to mathematician David Hilbert who in his 1900 address to the International Congress of Mathematicians proposed 23 problems to shape the development of

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/department/colloquiaS11.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Math/CS at HWS
    Department Prizes Majors and Minors Guide to Recommendation Letters Major Minor Audit Forms 3 2 Engineering First Year Advising Math Placement Info Some Of Our Work Programming Textbook Eck CS Theory Textbook Critchlow Eck Analysis Textbook Mitchell Belding Biostatistics Textbook Mitchell Other Publications Eric Nelson Visiting Assistant Professor Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Hobart and William Smith Colleges Mailing address Hobart and William Smith Colleges 300 Pulteney Street Geneva

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/faculty/nelson.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Math/CS at HWS
    Eck CS Theory Textbook Critchlow Eck Analysis Textbook Mitchell Belding Biostatistics Textbook Mitchell Other Publications Mark Radosevch Visiting Assistant Professor Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Hobart and William Smith Colleges Mailing address Hobart and William Smith Colleges 300 Pulteney Street Geneva New York 14456 Office Office Phone Fax science office Lansing 302 315 781 3607 315 781 3860 Email radosevich hws edu M ark Radosevich joined the department in

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/web/faculty/radosevich.html (2016-02-07)
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