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  • CPSC 453: Artificial Intelligence
    language It describes algorithms and data structures in language neutral terms Implementations in various languages are available on the textbook s web site Traditionally a lot of A I programming has been done in LISP and Prolog languages that are appropriate for symbolic computation We will cover at least a little Prolog and we might also do a little LISP depending on the interests of the students in the class Homework and Term Project I will assign and collect homework throughout the course Some of the assignments will be programming exercises but the majority will be written assignments Many of these will be taken from the end of chapter exercises in the textbook You can always discuss homework with other students as well as with me but you should write your own programs and you should write up your own answers to written assignments In addition to the homework each student in the class will work on an individual term project You will design a project in consultation with me during the course of the term The project will most likely consist of a research paper together with a few demonstration programs Part of the project will be a presentation Presentations will probably be scheduled during the reading period after the end of classes Meet the Candidates The Math and Computer Science Department will be trying to hire another computer science professor this term We will be bringing three or four candidates to campus Each candidate will give a talk and will meet with students As part of the requirements for this course you should attend each candidate s talk or else go to that candidate s meeting with students In the event that you absolutely cannot meet with a given candidate it might be possible to substitute attendance at other departmental talks Part of your grade for the course is based on meeting this requirement Tests and Grading There will be three in class tests which will be given on Monday February 21 Friday April 1 and Friday April 29 Because senior grades are due at the same time as the scheduled final exam period for this course there will be no final exam Your grade for the course will be determined as followed First Test 18 Second Test 18 Third Test 18 Term Project 20 Other Assignments 20 Meet the Candidates 6 Attendance Policy This is a very small class and it is important for everyone to be at every class In the event that you absolutely cannot be in class please inform me in advance if possible Although I do not formally count attendance as part of the grade I reserve the right to lower your grade because of excessive absence Office Hours Email WWW My office is room 301 in Lansing Hall just next door to our regular classroom My office phone extension is 3398 I am on campus most days and you are welcome to come in anytime you can find me there I will

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/cpsc453_s05.html (2016-02-07)
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  • FYS 198: Mind and Machine
    really hard core philosophy The Mind s I Fantasies and Reflections on Self and Soul edited by Douglas Hofstadter and Daniel C Dennett A collection of essays and short stories that relate to the question What is the mind Some selections from this book will be assigned readings for the whole class Other selections will be read by individuals as part of their projects for the course The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks A collection of case studies by Sacks a neurologist who treats patients with a variety of mental disorders and brain dysfunctions We will read several selections from this book because one way to investigate how the mind works is to look at the ways it can break down Assignments Journal and Projects There will be a reading assignment for almost every class You should come to class prepared to discuss the reading This includes asking questions on parts you didn t understand as well as bringing up points with which you disagreed or which you found particularly interesting As a significant part of your work for the course you will keep a journal in which you will write about the class the readings your reactions to them and anything else you want to include I will collect journals in class every Tuesday and return them in class on Thursday I expect you to write at least a few pages every week Your journal should include at least the following A factual summary of the week s reading Your reactions to the reading and to class discussion Questions and comments that you would like to raise in class Notes about relationships that you find between one week s work and the rest of the course between this course and other classes you are taking between the course and outside material that you find in magazines and newspapers etc Notes about work you are doing for your writing projects for the course You can also include whatever else you want I will not necessarily read everything that you write in your journal If there is something in your journal that you would particularly like me to respond to in writing make sure you mark it conspicuously There will be four major writing assignments in the course These four papers will provide the major part of your grade for the course Except for the last paper which will be due at the end of the course you will have the option of rewriting any paper once to try to improve your grade I expect your papers to be reasonably free of spelling grammar and word use errors not more than about one per page A paper that does not meet this requirement is unlikely to receive a grade higher than C Two of the four writing assignments will be group projects Each project will involve a class presentation in addition to the paper For these projects the class will work in groups of two

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/fys198_f97.html (2016-02-07)
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  • FYS 198: Mind and Machine
    and dangerous because it can make people think of themselves as machines In this recent and rather short book he applies his ideas to trends in education and use of the Internet Synaptic Self How Our Brains Become Who We Are by Joseph LeDoux This is a book about the physical structure and functioning of the brain and how it relates to thought emotion and consciousness Emergence The Connected Lives of Ants Brains Cities and Software by Steven Johnson Emergence refers to the way that complex behavior can emerge from the interaction of large numbers of simple parts or entities In the last ten years of so some people have begun to believe that the right approach to AI is not to program intelligence but to let it emerge from a suitably designed system of simple components This is the Artificial Life approach to AI This book is a popular account of emergence Assignments Quizzes and Grading Your major individual work for this course will be three papers The third paper which I will expect to be a little longer than the other two will be submitted at the end of the term in place of a final exam You will be given a chance to rewrite each of the first two papers if you aren t satisfied with the first grade that you get These three papers together will count for 50 of your grade with each of the first two papers counting 15 and the third paper counting 20 In addition to the three individual papers you will work with a partner on a project that will involve another paper and a class presentation For this project you will read all or part of a book or for one of the projects watch some movies You and your partner will have charge of the class for one period in which you present your project and lead a class discussion on it Part of the presentation will be a paper about the project The paper will be distributed to the class as part of the official readings for the course I have tentatively selected the following works for this project AI The Tumultuous History of the Search for Artificial Intelligence by Daniel Crevier Flesh and Machines How Robots will Change Us by Rodney A Brooks The movies 2001 A Space Odyssey Bicenteniel Man and A I Artificial Intelligence Mind over Machine The Power of Human Intuition and Expertise in the Era of the Computer by Hubert and Stuart Dreyfus or possibly some other philosophical discussion of AI Animal Minds by Donald R Griffin Descartes Error Emotion Reason and the Human Brain by Antonio R Damasio The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Anthropologist on Mars by Oliver Sacks Artificial Life by Steven Levy I will have more information for you about this project early in the term The project including paper and presentation will count for 20 of the course grade There will be quizzes which

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/fys198_f03.html (2016-02-07)
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  • FYS 198: Mind and Machine
    We will read several of these at various times during the course to help us learn something about the physical functioning of the brain ROBOT Mere Machine to Transcendent Mind by Hans Moravec Oxford University Press ISBN 0195136306 The author a robotics researcher at Carnegie Mellon University is a true believer in artificial intelligence He believes that people are in fact machines and that as computers increase in power they will inevitably become as intelligent as people In fact he believes that they will grow beyond us and replace us On the Internet by Hubert Dreyfus Routledge Press ISBN 0415228077 Dreyfus is one of the most famous critics of the artificial intelligence project He believes that AI will never succeed at least using its traditional approach to the problem and furthermore that belief in AI is dehumanizing and dangerous because it can make people think of themselves as machines In this recent and rather short book he applies his ideas to trends in education and use of the Internet The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks Touchstone Press ISBN 0684853949 A collection of clinical case studies by neurologist Oliver Sacks One of the ways to study the mind is to study the ways it can fail and we will read about several of Sacks patients to gain some insight into this Emergence The Connected Lives of Ants Brains Cities and Software by Steven Johnson Scribners Press ISBN 0684868768 Emergence refers to the way that complex behavior can emerge from the interaction of large numbers of simple parts or entities In the last ten years of so some people have begun to believe that the right approach to AI is not to program intelligence but to let it emerge from a suitably designed system of simple components This is the Artificial Life approach to AI This book is a popular account of emergence Assignments Quizzes and Grading Your major individual work for this course will be three papers The third paper which I will expect to be a little longer than the other two will be submitted at the end of the term in place of a final exam You will be given a chance to rewrite each of the first two papers if you aren t satisfied with the first grade that you get These three papers together will count for 50 of your grade with each of the first two papers counting 15 and the third paper counting 20 In addition to the three individual papers you will work with a partner on a project that will involve another paper and a class presentation For this project you will read all or part of a book You and your partner will have charge of the class for one period in which you present your project and lead a class discussion on it You will also be responsible for selecting a short reading for the rest of the class which they will read in advance

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/fys198_f04.html (2016-02-07)
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  • FSEM 142 Syllabus, Fall 2013
    first paper and likely for the third I will require you to meet with me in my office to discuss your plans for the paper Also I hope that the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science will be able to sponsor a talk by a well known computer science researcher about The Semantic Web If that comes off you will be required to attend the talk or if that is absolutely impossible to make up the missed opportunity in some way These activities will be part of your participation grade Although it is not a requirement I hope that you will keep your eyes open for interesting news about technology and its role in the modern world You can bring what you find to class to tell the class about it and discuss it We can always take a few minutes of class time to do so Attendance and Participation This course relies on your participation for success and a significant part of your grade will be based on your participation Participation includes not just talking in class It also includes preparing for discussion by completing the reading and writing assignments and in some cases working with other students such as by reading and commenting on their papers Of course you can t participate in a class if you are not there Attendance is required I don t have any specific rules about how many classes you can miss or how many points I will deduct when you miss a class However missing class will certainly affect your participation grade and excessive absences will certainly lower your grade for the course I will warn you if you are in danger of this When you miss a class in this course or any course that you take it is good practice to contact the professor If you know in advance that you will have to miss a class talk to your professor beforehand If something comes up at the last minute that forces you to miss a class email an apology or explanation as soon as you can Quizzes and Tests Although this course is mainly about writing and discussion there is a certain amount of factual material that you are expected to master This includes material from readings lectures and labs I do not expect you to memorize everything that you read or hear in the course but I do expect you to retain significant points of information There will be two factual quizzes given in class on Wednesday October 2 and Friday November 8 There will also be a final exam which will take place during the official final exam period for this course Tuesday December 10 at 8 30 AM This is the first exam on the first day of exams for the Fall semester The final exam will include a factual quiz similar to the two in class quizzes It will also include some essay questions about the major ideas that have been covered in the class You will have at least some idea in advance about what the essay questions will be Grading It should be reasonably easy to get a B in this course not so easy to get an A and relatively hard to get a C or worse That is if you take the course seriously turn in the work and come to class you should do fine Here is how I plan to weight the various components of the final grade for the course Quiz 1 8 Quiz 2 8 Final Exam 14 First paper 10 Second paper 10 Third paper 20 Participation 30 Note that participation includes attendance the daily writing assignments and any work I ask you to do for computer labs as well as participation in class discussion This Course and the Eight Goals The HWS curriculum requires that you take courses to address eight goals Goal 1 Develop skills for effective communication including the ability to read and listen critically and to speak and write effectively and Goal 2 Develop skills for critical thinking and argumentation including the ability to articulate a question to identify and gain access to appropriate information to organize evidence and to construct a complex written argument are fundamental to learning and scholarly communication It is assumed that the courses that you take will inevitably address these goals This course certainly is designed to help you begin working on these two goals on a college level As for the other six goals you must certify at some point that you have addressed each one Usually this is done in consultation with your major advisor in your Junior year However you can also ask your current advisor to sign off on a goal at any time This course by itself does not fully address any of the six goals However it does address Goal 3 quantitative reasoning and Goal 8 ethical judgment to some extent It is even possible that you might fully address Goal 8 if you write a final paper does some deep analysis of an ethical issue Statement from the CTL At Hobart and William Smith Colleges we encourage you to learn collaboratively and to seek the resources that will enable you to succeed The Center for Teaching and Learning CTL is one of those resources CTL programs and staff help you engage with your learning accomplish the tasks before you enhance your thinking and skills and empower you to do your best Resources at CTL are many Study Mentors help you find your time and manage your responsibilities Writing Fellows help you think well on paper and professional staff help you assess academic needs Your are encouraged to explore CTL resources designed to encourage your very best work You can talk with me about these resources visit the CTL office on the 2nd floor of the library to discuss options with the staff or visit the CTL website https www hws edu academics ctl Study Mentors The CTL resource especially valuable

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/fsem142_f13.html (2016-02-07)
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  • BIDS 288: Chaos and Complexity
    The newer complexity theory shows how unpredictably complex behavior can result from the interaction of many simple well understood components Complexity of this sort can be modeled on a computer but it also exhibited by the economic and biological systems that will be the main focus of the course As the central text we will be using Complexity The Emerging Science at the Edge of Order and Chaos by Mitchell Waldrop We will also read some individual articles and all or part of the following books Wonderful Life by Steven Jay Gould Geography and Trade by Paul Krugman and Cities and the Wealth of Nations by Jane Jacobs Papers and Assignments The writing assignments for this course will include three short 2 to 4 page papers and one longer 7 to 10 page paper The short papers will be due on April 12 April 27 and May 17 The long paper will be due at the end of the term at the scheduled final exam period Sunday June 4 at 7 00 PM All papers will be read and graded by both instructors There will also be other short assignments and projects throughout the term For papers turned in late 1 3 letter grade will be deducted per day Quizzes There will be weekly quizzes based on readings and class discussion The two lowest quiz grades will be dropped A missed quiz will count as one of the dropped grades Grading Short papers will each count for 1 9 of the final grade for the course The long term paper will count for 2 9 of the grade Other assignments will contribute another 1 9 The average quiz grade computed after dropping the two lowest quiz grades will count for 2 9 of the final course grade The last 1

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/eck/courses/bids288_s95.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Introduction to Computer Graphics Preface
    in a Web browser The Web version of this book includes interactive demo programs that are integrated into the Web pages that make up the book The sample programs and demos use HTML canvas graphics in Chapter 2 or WebGL in later chapters Canvas graphics should work well in almost any modern browser WebGL is a newer technology and is more problematic It is implemented in modern desktop browsers including Internet Explorer 11 Edge Chrome Firefox and Safari It also runs in many browsers on newer mobile devices However each of those browsers have had some problems with some of my programs on some machines Firefox and Chrome seem to work most consistently I wish I could be more definite than that but the reality of WebGL at this point is that you might have to look for a combination of computer and browser that will work for you The sample programs and demos can all be found in the download of the web site version of this book which is available from its main page Look for them in the folders named source and demo Note that some Web browsers won t use images from the local file system in canvas and WebGL graphics Those browsers will have errors when they try to run some of the samples locally instead of over the Web For me Firefox can run such examples from the local file system but Chrome cannot This issue affects only some of the examples I have taught computer graphics every couple of years or so for almost 30 years As the field developed I had to make major changes almost every time I taught the course but for much of that time I was able to structure the course primarily around OpenGL 1 1 a graphics API that was in common use for an extended period OpenGL 1 1 supported fundamental graphics concepts in a way that was fairly easy to use OpenGL is still widely supported but for various reasons the parts of it that were easy to use have been officially dropped from the latest versions although they are in practice supported on most desktop computers The result is a much more powerful API but one that is much harder to learn In particular modern OpenGL in its pure form does not make for a good introduction to graphics programming My approach in this book is to use a subset of OpenGL 1 1 to introduce the fundamental concepts of three dimensional graphics I then go on to cover WebGL a version of OpenGL that runs in a web browser as an example of the more modern approach to computer graphics While OpenGL makes up the major foundation for the course the real emphasis is on fundamental concepts such as geometric modeling and transformations hierarchical modeling and scene graphs color lighting and textures and animation Chapter 1 is a short overview of computer graphics It introduces many concepts that will be covered in much

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/graphicsbook/preface.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Introduction to Computer Graphics Table of Contents
    5 3 Homogeneous Coordinates Section 3 6 Using GLUT and JOGL 3 6 1 Using GLUT 3 6 2 Using JOGL 3 6 3 About glsim js Chapter 4 OpenGL 1 1 Light and Material Section 4 1 Introduction to Lighting 4 1 1 Light and Material 4 1 2 Light Properties 4 1 3 Normal Vectors 4 1 4 The OpenGL Lighting Equation Section 4 2 Light and Material in OpenGL 1 1 4 2 1 Working with Material 4 2 2 Defining Normal Vectors 4 2 3 Working with Lights 4 2 4 Global Lighting Properties Section 4 3 Image Textures 4 3 1 Texture Coordinates 4 3 2 MipMaps and Filtering 4 3 3 Texture Target and Texture Parameters 4 3 4 Texture Transformation 4 3 5 Loading a Texture from Memory 4 3 6 Texture from Color Buffer 4 3 7 Texture Objects 4 3 8 Loading Textures in C 4 3 9 Using Textures with JOGL Section 4 4 Lights Camera Action 4 4 1 Attribute Stack 4 4 2 Moving Camera 4 4 3 Moving Light Chapter 5 Three js A 3D Scene Graph API Section 5 1 Three js Basics 5 1 1 Scene Renderer Camera 5 1 2 THREE Object3D 5 1 3 Object Geometry Material 5 1 4 Lights 5 1 5 A Modeling Example Section 5 2 Building Objects 5 2 1 Indexed Face Sets 5 2 2 Curves and Surfaces 5 2 3 Textures 5 2 4 Transforms 5 2 5 Loading JSON Models Section 5 3 Other Features 5 3 1 Anaglyph Stereo 5 3 2 User Input 5 3 3 Shadows 5 3 4 Cubemap Textures and Skyboxes 5 3 5 Reflection and Refraction Chapter 6 Introduction to WebGL Section 6 1 The Programmable Pipeline 6 1 1 The WebGL Graphics Context 6 1 2 The Shader Program 6 1 3 Data Flow in the Pipeline 6 1 4 Values for Uniform Variables 6 1 5 Values for Attributes 6 1 6 Drawing a Primitive Section 6 2 First Examples 6 2 1 WebGL Context Options 6 2 2 A Bit of GLSL 6 2 3 The RGB Triangle in WebGL 6 2 4 Shape Stamper 6 2 5 The POINTS Primitive 6 2 6 WebGL Error Handling Section 6 3 GLSL 6 3 1 Basic Types 6 3 2 Data Structures 6 3 3 Qualifiers 6 3 4 Expressions 6 3 5 Function Definitions 6 3 6 Control Structures 6 3 7 Limits Section 6 4 Image Textures 6 4 1 Texture Units and Texture Objects 6 4 2 Working with Images 6 4 3 More Ways to Make Textures 6 4 4 Cubemap Textures Section 6 5 Implementing 2D Transforms 6 5 1 Transforms in GLSL 6 5 2 Transforms in JavaScript Chapter 7 3D Graphics with WebGL Section 7 1 Transformations in 3D 7 1 1 About Shader Scripts 7 1 2 Introducing glMatrix 7 1 3 Transforming Coordinates 7 1 4 Transforming Normals

    Original URL path: http://math.hws.edu/graphicsbook/contents-with-subsections.html (2016-02-07)
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