archive-edu.com » EDU » I » IASTATE.EDU

Total: 30

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Welcome to the Self-Stigma Research Collaborative | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    self stigma and its relationship with the experience of mental illness and help seeking Another goal is to develop and test interventions that will help reduce stigma and increase the likelihood that people in need will seek quality mental health care services The purpose of this website is to organize the information regarding the self stigma associated with seeking help and to provide a useful tool for researchers and clinicians who wish to learn more about self stigma contribute to ongoing research in this area and implement innovative interventions that will assist those they work with Background In 2005 Drs Vogel and Wade had a conversation about the role of stigma on the help seeking process Informed by previous research the discussion turned to the potentially differential roles that public stigma and self stigma might have on one s willingness to seek help From that conversation the research on self stigma at Iowa State was born The first task was to create a reliable and valid measurement of self stigma for seeking help As a result they created the Self Stigma for Seeking Help Scale SSOSH Vogel Wade Haake 2006 Over the past 5 years requests for information about the

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/ (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Self-Stigma Information | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    as more emotionally unstable less interesting and less confident than those described as seeking help for back pain and than those described as not seeking help for depression Ben Porath 2002 As a result it seems that it is not just having a disorder but seeking psychological services that is stigmatized by the public Given the negative perceptions of those who seek psychological services it is not surprising that individuals hide their psychological concerns and avoid treatment to limit the harmful consequences associated with being stigmatized Corrigan Matthews 2003 Consistent with this individuals are less likely to seek helpfor issues that are viewed negatively by others Overbeck 1977 In addition surveys of undergraduate students have found that those who endorse stigmas of the mentally ill are less likely to seek psychological help Cooper Corrigan Watson 2003 Researchers have also found that perceptions of counseling stigma predict attitudes toward seeking counseling Deane Todd 1996 Komiya Good Sherrod 2000 Vogel Wester Wei Boysen 2005 as well as willingness to seek counseling Rochlen Mohr Hargrove 1999 Survey research with community samples has also found that the fear of being viewed as crazy is a common barrier to seeking professional help Nelson Barbaro 1985 and that participants who do not seek therapy are more likely to report stigma as a treatment barrier than those who do Stefl Prosperi 1985 Furthermore the stigma associated with mental illness has been linked to the early termination of treatment Sirey et al 2001 In all there is clear support that awareness of the stigma associated with seeking treatment has a negative influence on people s attitudes toward seeking help and keeps many people from seeking help even when they have significant problems The Role of Self Stigma Despite the awareness of the relationship between perceived public stigma and the decision to seek treatment the complex role that stigma plays in this decision making process is not fully known Corrigan 1998 2004 asserted that there are two separate types of stigma affecting an individual s decision to seek treatment The first public stigma is the perception held by others i e by society that an individual is socially unacceptable The second self stigma is the perception held by the individual that he or she is socially unacceptable which can lead to a reduction in self esteem or self worth if the person seeks psychological help Vogel et al 2006 In other words the negative images expressed by society toward those who seek psychological services may be internalized Corrigan 1998 2004 Holmes River 1998 and lead people to perceive themselves as inferior inadequate or weak Nadler Fisher 1986 As a result people higher in self stigma may decide to forego psychological services to maintain a positive image of themselves Miller 1985 Whereas the direct relationship of perceived public stigma on one s willingness to seek psychological services is well established the role of self stigma has only recently been addressed Related research however has shown that people can internalize negative

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=information (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • SSOSH Scale | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    T he Self Stigma Of Seeking Psychology Help SSOSH scale is free for use for research purposes To download the original or translated versions of the scale please click on the links below Self Stigma of Seeking Help SSOSH scale by Vogel Wade Haake 2006 Arabic Version translated by Fatima Rashed Al Darmaki Chinese Version translated by Hsin Ya Liao German Version translated by Agata Drabek Greek Version I translated by Elli Kouvaraki Greek Version II translated by Sotiropoulou Ifigeneia Italian Version translated by Aimone Pignattelli Japanese Version translated by Moe Ina Portugese Version translated by Marta Gonçalves Romanian Version translated by Alina Zlati Spanish Version translated by Francisco Collazos Sanchez Turkish Version translated by Nursel Topkaya Lithuanian Version translated by Dalia Nasvytiene Other Versions of the Scale Self Stigma of Academic Help Seeking adapted by Greta Winograd Military Stigma Scale by Skopp Bush Vogel Wade Sirotin McCann Metzger Abamukong Turkish Reanalysis of Original 45 Items Translated analyzed by Sevgi Sezer and Fatih Kezer Portugese Version adapted for children translated and adapted by Marta Gonçalves Related Help Seeking Scales Perception of Stigmatization by Others for Seeking Help PSOSH Vogel Wade Ascheman 2009 Disclosure Expectations Scale DES Vogel Wester 2003 If

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=SSOSH (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • People | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    galbraith wlv ac uk Sarahbeth Golden Assistant Professor Lasell College US sgolden lasell edu Marta Gonçalves Invited Assistant Professor Lisbon University Institute ISCTE IUL Portugal Marta Goncalves iscte pt Hsin Ya Liao Assistant Professor The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong hliao cuhk edu hk Alicia Lucksted Assistant Professor University of Maryland US aluckste psych umaryland edu Jason B Luoma Psychologist Portland Psychotherapy Clinic Research and Training Center US jbluoma gmail com Winnie W S Mak Associate Professor The Chinese University of Hong Kong Hong Kong wwsmak psy cuhk edu hk Akihiko Aki Masuda Assistant Professor Georgia State University US amasuda gsu edu Avril McCullagh Psychologist Ireland avril mccullagh1 hse ie Dalia Nasvytiene Psychologist Vilnius Pedagogical University Lithuania dalia nasvytiene vpu lt Jonathan Mohr Assistant Professor University of Maryland US jmohr umd edu Jesse Owen Assistant Professor University of Louisville US jesse owen louisville edu Mark Rubin Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle Australia Mark Rubin newcastle edu au Georg Schomerus Senior Lecturer University of Medicine Greifswald Germany georg schomerus uni greifswald de Zipora Shechtman Professor University of Haifa Israel ziporas construct haifa ac il Francisco Collazos Sanchez Servicio de Psiquiatría Hospital Universitari Vall d Hebron Spain pacocollazos hotmail com

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=people (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Research Studies | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    condition Participants completed measures pre and post intervention and at a 3 week follow up Those in the repeated exposure intervention improved significantly more than the single exposure and control groups on help seeking attitudes and perception of peer norms but not for stigma The effect of repeated exposures on attitudes and peer norms showed both immediate and longer term effects Effective empirically supported interventions capable of reaching large numbers of people are necessary to improve utilization rates of counseling services This study offers support for the use of repeated video interventions in changing attitudes and perceptions of counseling Skopp N A Bush N E Vogel D L Wade N G Sirotin A P McCann R A Metzger Abamukong M J 2012 Development and initial testing of a measure of public and self stigma in the military Journal of Clinical Psychology 68 1036 1047 doi 10 1002 jclp 21889 pdf Abstract This research developed and tested the Military Stigma Scale MSS a 26 item scale designed to measure public and self stigma two theorized core components of mental health stigma Method The sample comprised 1 038 active duty soldiers recruited from a large Army installation Soldiers mean age was 26 7 standard deviation 5 9 years and 93 6 were male The sample was randomly split into a scale development group n 520 and a confirmatory group n 518 Results Factor analysis conducted with the scale development group resulted in the adoption of two factors named public and self stigma accounting for 52 1 of the variance Confirmatory factor analysis conducted with the confirmatory group indicated good fit for the two factor model Both factors were components of a higher order stigma factor The public and self stigma scales for the exploratory and confirmatory groups demonstrated good internal consistency α 94 and 89 α 95 and 87 respectively Demographic differences in stigma were consistent with theory and previous empirical research Soldiers who had seen a mental health provider scored lower in self stigma than those who had not Conclusions The MSS comprises two internally consistent dimensions that appear to capture the constructs of public and self stigma The overall results indicate that public and self stigma are dimensions of stigma that are relevant to active duty soldiers and suggest the need to assess these dimensions in future military stigma research C 2012 Wiley Periodicals Inc J Clin Psychol 68 1036 1047 2012 Vogel D L Heimerdinger Edwards S R Hammer J H Hubbard A 2011 Boys don t cry Examination of the links between masculine norms and help seeking attitudes for men from diverse cultural backgrounds Journal of Counseling Psychology 58 368 382 doi 10 1037 a0023688 pdf Abstract The role of conformity to dominant U S masculine norms as an antecedent to help seeking attitudes in men has been established using convenience samples made up largely of college age and European American males However the role of conformity to masculine norms on help seeking attitudes for noncollege age men or for men from diverse backgrounds is not well understood To fill this gap in the literature the present study examined the cross cultural relevance of a mediational model of the relationships between conformity to dominant U S masculine norms and attitudes toward counseling through the mediator of self stigma of seeking counseling for 4 773 men from both majority and nonmajority populations race ethnicity and sexual orientation Structural equation modeling results showed that the model established using college males from majority groups European American heterosexual may be applicable to a community sample of males from differing racial ethnic groups and sexual orientations However some important differences in the presence and strengths of the relation ships between conformity to dominant masculine norms and the other variables in the model were present across different racial ethnic groups and sexual orientations These findings suggest the need to pay specific theoretical and clinical attention to how conformity to dominant masculine norms and self stigma are linked to unfavorable attitudes toward help seeking for these men in order to encourage underserved men s help seeking behavior Wade N G Post B Cornish M Vogel D L Tucker J 2011 Predictors of the change in self stigma following a single session of group counseling Journal of Counseling Psychology 58 170 182 doi 10 1037 a0022630 pdf Abstract One of the major obstacles to seeking psychological help is the stigma associated with counseling and therapy Self stigma the fear of losing self respect or self esteem as a result of seeking help is an important factor in the help seeking process In the present study college students meeting a clinical cutoff for psychological symptoms participated in 1 session of group counseling that either contained therapist self disclosure or did not In general participants reported significantly less self stigma following the session Working alliance bond and session depth significantly predicted the change in self stigma Furthermore self stigma as well as bond depth psychological symptoms and being female predicted the intention to seek help following the session Self stigma and session depth also predicted interest in continuing with counseling The therapist self disclosure condition however had no effect on the change in self stigma intentions to seek help or interest in continuing with group counseling Hammer J H Vogel D L 2010 Men s help seeking for depression Efficacy of a male sensitive brochure about counseling The Counseling Psychologist 38 296 313 doi 10 1177 0011000009351937 pdf Abstract Although depression among men is becoming better understood men still underuse counseling services Hence there is an important need for improved ways to reach out to depressed men This study examined the efficacy of a male sensitive brochure aimed toward improving attitudes about seeking counseling and reducing the self stigma of seeking counseling among 1 397 depressed men who had not previously sought help for their depression Results indicate that the male sensitive brochure which incorporated current knowledge from the psychology of men and masculinity and mental health marketing

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=research (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Participate in Research | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Directory Maps Contact Us Self Stigma Research Collaborative Department of Psychology Welcome to the Self Stigma Research Collaborative Self Stigma Information SSOSH Scale People Research Participate in Research Links Contact Participate in Research Coming soon Department of Psychology College of Liberal Arts and Sciences W112 Lagomarcino Hall 515 294 1742 psych tech iastate edu Copyright

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=participate (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Research Links | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    Research Participate in Research Links Contact Research Links National Consortium on Stigma and Empowerment Portland Psychotherapy Clinic Stigma Research and Action new journal focused on stigma research Other LInks International Mental Health Research Organization World Health Organization National Alliance for Mental Illness NAMI National Mental Health Association American Psychiatric Association Healthy Minds Health Lives National Mental Health Consumers Self Help Clearinghouse Mental Health Screening Its up to us Mental Health

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=links (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Contact Us: | Self-Stigma Research Collaborative
    N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Directory Maps Contact Us Self Stigma Research Collaborative Department of Psychology Welcome to the Self Stigma Research Collaborative Self Stigma Information SSOSH Scale People Research Participate in Research Links Contact Contact Us Phone 515 294 1582 Email dvogel iastate edu Department of Psychology College of Liberal Arts and Sciences W112 Lagomarcino Hall 515 294 1742 psych tech

    Original URL path: http://selfstigma.psych.iastate.edu/?q=contact (2014-01-21)
    Open archived version from archive



  •