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  • IRIS Internship Program - Allante Harrison
    ve gotten the chance to work with have been amazing and my mentor has been great source of knowledge and advice Though I m physically leaving Georgia Tech today I will be sure to keep in contact with the people I ve met While I m sure that my research will extend into the upcoming semester I think there s a beach in my nearer excuse my poor grammar future Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Data Data and a Spike June 24th 2013 The past couple of days have been filled with data I ve spent the majority of my time downloading extracting filtering and organizing in preparation for the waveform cross correlation which will scan a template event against a period of continuous data in order to find the similarity of waveforms By running the cross correlation on my first period of continuous data I got the favorable result which is a seismograph with a single spike at 1 0 As in statistics correaltions can run from 1 0 to 1 0 with 1 0 being an identical match self detection This was reassurance that the correlation was working as expected I m not sure if I m able to upload pictures using this editor but believe me it looks pretty During our first period of continuous data which spanned 10 days we were able to successfully detect a number of events not listed in our earthquake catalog Which is pretty cool I am now in the process of determining the magnitude of the new events and expecting more good news very soon Short and sweet Link to Post Comment on this Post 2 Comments An Interesting First Week June 12th 2013 Last week 6 3 6 7 was one filled with mixed emotions On Monday I was given my first insight into what the focus of my research would be Honestly I had no idea what my mentor was describing to me but after reading a few papers it began to make more sense My project goals are To use Earthscope USArray data to detect more events in Texas from 2009 2011 To use the newly found events to study possible interaction with hydrofracturing Some accomplishments from last week Read related research papers by Frohlich and Horton Downloaded continuous station data for a 10 day period from the IRIS DMC 16 total stations Downloaded extracted and organized data for template events 67 total template events Made a Makefile Correction I made what I thought was a Makefile I actually wrote a bash script which was still very helpful and a lot quicker Began picking P and S wave arrival times in SAC for each template event And I guess I learned the difference between a Makefile a bash script if you want to count that lol My goals for the summer aren t too convoluted This is great opportunity for me to get some quality research under my belt By the end of the

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/75 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Rachel Marzen
    to steer the boat He was able to take this time to explain things to me because he had set the ship to automatically travel on a bearing oriented towards Point Loma In addition to multiple compasses and steering equipment he had a computer that showed water depths and could provide the bearing from the ship s current location to another selected location radar and other tools to detect nearby ships and data on sea floor depth directly beneath the ship from the ship sending down and receiving signals Right after his grand tour of the captain s area we saw a school of dolphins swimming right next to the ship I m so glad that there were members of the scientific party who took the time when I asked questions to explain things like how the boat operated how the instruments were designed and what processes they were running such as triangulating the location of the OBS s and monitoring the path of the glider in a 500 m radius circle around the OBS and other seismology related projects they were working on Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Chopsticks July 16th 2013 An interesting problem I was working with when designing methods to bin and average our anisotropy data into a grid format stemmed from the fast axis calculations the range of the arctan function and the fact that each trend representing the fast axis orientation can be described by two angles over azimuth range 0 360 Gabi and I thought through two approaches to this problem However because the first approach is best explained by visuals and the second approach requires a combination of visuals and equations it s a little unorthodox but the rest of this blog entry will be shown or described in the following figures Also this is a work in progress If you have interesting suggestions or see an error in logic I d be happy to hear about it and make adjustments to my current set of calculations which is based on the geometric explanation below Approach 1 Approach 2 Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Party in the USA July 8th 2013 Happy belated 4th of July After spending the weekend at the beach in LA I m ready to get back to business Three updates on the project 1 A comparison of the first term of the 2 Psi fit data I have collected compare well with the data from Laske et al 2011 in which measurements of shear velocity are also made but with a different method 2 station path averaged dispersion curves which makes us more confident that these recent results are a good representation of the velocity structure beneath Hawaii Below is an image showing results from the method of Laske et al left and the results I have obtained so far right Phase velocity anomalies are measured relative to Nishimura Forsyth 1989 velocity values for Pacific plate between 52 and 110 Myr where red is slow and blue is fast I hope you feel the patriotic spirit behind these plots These plots may improve as we try to incorporate the differential pressure guage data from the SWELL pilot experiment and from Phase 1 of the the PLUME project to get better resultion close to the Islands 2 After looking through the results from various combinations of land OBS data my mentor and I have decided to discard the data from the land stations but counter balance the resulting decrease in geographic coverage of azimuthal anisotropy measurements by expanding the tolerance of triangle size to an average side length between 1 and 7 degrees The result will be a decrease in resolution especially in areas to the northeast where there aren t many smaller triangles that provide azimuthal anisotropy measurements over a smaller area I have generated 284 anisotropy measurements for which there are typically 80 180 events contributing to the 2 Psi fit to plot changes in azimuthal anisotropy in an 13x13 grid around Hawaii Below I show an image of a histogram of the number of events contributing to each anisotropy measurement and a sample of how the 2 Psi yellow line fit to the event data grey raw data red binned data are used to determine the direction of the fast axis the azimuth corresponding to a local maximum in phase velocity and the amount of anisotropy Now I m working on using the data from the 2 Psi fit of the phase velocities of azimuthal anisotropy to generate a map that shows how azimuthal anisotropy changes with frequency both in magnitude and direction Because there are so many measurements I plan on binning and averaging the fast axis directions after setting them all within a 180 degree range and plotting those over a smoothed grid of binned averaged anisotropy measurements I m currently not sure the best way to plot line segments representing the direction of anisotropy based on azimuth but looking through the manual it seems like tilted thin rectangles may be a good bet Vectors may be good as well except I don t want to get an arrowhead because that wouldn t be representative of the fast axis measurement I m open to GMT suggestions 3 Now that we have made these measurements I think we will be starting the inversion to measure azimuthal anisotropy with respect to depth from our measurements based on frequency soon Link to Post Comment on this Post 1 Comments Tools June 25th 2013 In my last few posts all my titles corresponded to names of songs but since I wanted to talk about the methods I was using in my research I couldn t think of a song off the top of my head that would be appropriate But no fear A quick google search revealed that there is actually a band called Tool http en wikipedia org wiki Tool band so I am able to keep the

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/76 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Alexis McAdams
    clear that when it comes to modeling seismic data and focal mechanisms GMT is the way to go GMT also gives so much flexibility with automating the process The series of graphs you see above represents the Chimbote megathrust earthquake but with quick command in Unix I can generate the same graphs for any and all large earthquakes in South America Knowing the power of Unix and Awk is important too but the heavy lifting is done within GMT Link to Post Comment on this Post 1 Comments 2 weeks down 8 to go June 19th 2013 Looking back on weeks 1 and 2 of my internship I can see already that I ve come a long way The first few days of my internship were primarily made up of tutorials on Unix and GMT and I m becoming more and more familiar with these tools every time I generate a stick plot or a basemap GMT especially looked like a foreign language but with a lot of help from the tutorials I m making progress I worked on making some example maps and using the awk command to sort the data for week two and I think I ve got the hang of that too I m really glad I took those Intro to Programming courses at Augustana when I had the chance During this internship I didn t expect to meet a lot of people My assignment sounded like I would be in a computer lab for most of the day which has turned out to be true but I ve met some really great scientists here My fellow interns Elena and Isabella are fun coworkers and I ve met Dr Emry and Dr Hardebecke two seismologists that are doing research somewhat related to mine Erica Emry is actually an alumnus from Augustana so we ve been in contact before she s actually the one who encouraged me to take those programming courses Yesterday Dr Hardebecke called in by way of Google Hangout and we had a great discussion on my research project and on her work at the USGS I really can t help but feel so privileged to be working with such a great team and support network Linda is of course the best resource for when any of us have questions but talking with the grad students Ying and Louisa gives good insight into what grad school work is like Already more than two weeks have passed and though it has been a blur of reading discussing and scripting I feel as though it is already going way too fast Some of my goals for this summer included meeting new people becoming familiar with the tools and having a good relationship with my mentor and I m making great progress on all of those For this first third of the internship I want to become a master of GMT I want to have a firm understanding of what work I m doing here and I

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/77 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Monica Poletti
    tea and the dog sits on it it s totally my fault The raw data thing is kind of a major responsibility but I m excited to see what I can find Just for fun let s try another number dump Using pattern matching code one template on one channel of one day of data gave me 600 potential matches and another gave me 360 To make this fair let s underestimate a bit and say the average pattern will find 300 matches per run That means running my 290 templates over all the channels over the course of the month could potentially find 54 810 000 events or more That was really just for fun though because there s no way I m letting that happen As if there s even enough heap memory to allow for all those plots am I right Back to work on the code I go Is it normal for all the wiggles to start moving after a while Link to Post Comment on this Post 1 Comments California Dreamin June 12th 2013 With my first week of frustrating network issues and slow data downloads under my belt I ve begun to finally understand what it is I m supposed to be doing here I still feel like a complete newbie but I have an outline of a real project in my mind and the support of the amazing community here at Stanford Earth Sciences and I m ready to start making some progress My project entails working with a month s worth of contiuous seismic recordings from various stations in southern California in an area where seismic swarms are not uncommon After just a few days of data collection I was able to see that detecting events in this huge mess of information wasn t going to be an easy task and it became much more daunting when my advisor told me he anticipated possibly thousands of events to show up in the data I m a math and computer science student but that doesn t mean I won t get overwhelmed by 600 plots of potential earthquakes blowing up my monitor just from one run of a pattern matching program That by the way just happened Goals for the Summer Learn how to ride a bike with no hands Improve my ability to create clean codes with efficient processes Find direction with my project and actually present some results to my advisors and peers Gain a better understanding of real current geophysical research topics and their everyday relevance Discover ways to relate my background math CS to overcoming common obstacles in earth science research Perfect head handstand meditation techniques Not spend all my money on blueberries from the Palo Alto Farmer s Market William Shakespeare said The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream I m starting to see what he meant Whether or not my some of my goals are actually too lofty for one to

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/78 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Aaron Prunty
    Then again I ve never heard a scientist say You have too much data When an earthquake occurs sometimes it is preceded by a couple of foreshocks and it is always followed by many many aftershocks many many many aftershocks Most people s attention understandably would be drawn to main event itself the big climax of the earthquake story the epic event that causes all the buildings to sway and bridges to collapse with power plant explosions and fires and other exciting things assuming the earthquake is large enough of course As implied these big events usually only occur once in the story of an earthquake and once it has passed most normal people usually lose interest and resume with their day Seismologists on the other hand are not normal people Oh no we haven t seen the end of the story yet The plot goes on If we were to analyze the story of a typical earthquake we would see a relatively short period of small rumblings a big jump in activity and then a much longer period of continued smaller rumblings However all earthquakes are unique in some manner or another For example some earthquakes exhibit detectable foreshocks whereas others do not Or perhaps the earthquake has two or three large events instead of just one Using this story timeline as an analogy my dataset focuses on the small rumblings after the big event except there s a twist On November 5 2011 a magnitude 5 0 M5 0 earthquake ruptured the Wilzetta fault in Oklahoma Less than a day later a M5 7 earthquake occurred less than 2 km away from the first On November 8 another M5 0 earthquake occurred Each earthquake generated thousands of its own aftershocks In this sequence of events the first earthquake is classified as a large foreshock the second the main event and the third a large aftershock The story of the Oklahoma earthquake sequence therefore has a large event in each section of the timeline and each earthquake is thought to have activated a separate portion of the Wilzetta fault system My dataset consists of the thousands of aftershocks recorded by 47 seismometer stations in the days and months following the first M5 0 earthquake Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Papers More Papers and MFAST June 7th 2013 The first week of the internship is almost over and I have already accumulated a dense pile of research papers thicker than my copy of Atlas Shrugged thank you Danielle for the light reading Several of the papers served the purpose of providing a historical background on similar case studies of potentially induced earthquakes near wastewater injection sties including a 200 some page white paper on the topic released by the National Academy of Sciences other papers served the purpose of expanding on the methods of measuring shear wave splitting SWS and structural anisotropy Finally I am working my way through the manual on how to implement the

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/79 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Josh Russell
    trendy week July 21st 2013 Well this was my last week of working on data analysis before going to the field My original goal was to mostly write my abstract by the end of the week but while I FAILED to do that I do feel that I accomplished quite a bit I spent the week mostly looking for trends in the move out curves After days of looking at the basin geometry for the 7 main layers of the basin sediments I finally found some hopefully interesting trends in the data After finding these trends I started working on some figures for my AGU poster I still have a lot of work to do but here is a rough preview of one of my figures illustrating a few of the trends in the move out curves The top row is the move out for the real data the middle row is synthetic data I created to match the data and the bottom row is the velocity model for the top 5 kilometers that I used for my synthetics From left to right are three different seismic stations the left station in a shallow part of the basin the middle station an intermediate and the right station over a deep part of the basin There are large negative amplitudes blue very shallow in the move out curves for the part of the basin with thick slow shallow layers station in the right hand column The trend seems to be that as the slow layers get thicker the early arrivals in the move out curves increase in amplitude and all of the reverberations shift later in time slightly and appear to be deeper in the crust Therefore this could be effecting our crustal thickness measurements making the Moho appear deeper than it actually is I m hoping to have enough time once I get back from the field to change the assumed velocities of the CCP stacks compensating for these slow upper layers and recalculate crustal thickness While I m excited to have finally found some interesting trends in my data I m really looking forward to the next 2 weeks of fieldwork in Kentucky We will be camping Link to Post Comment on this Post 1 Comments Week 6 Head em up and Move em out July 13th 2013 It is hard to believe that next week is officially my last full week of working in the lab After that I will be in the field for the last 2 3 weeks of the internship which I m really looking forward to While it has been a productive week the realization that the end is near has also made it somewhat stressful Although I ve accomplished more than I could have hoped during the past month and half especially becoming comfortable with the computer programs I don t feel that I have any obvious results as of yet And I definitely have a long way to go before I ll have an abstract that I m happy with submitting to AGU not to mention a poster With that being said I ll still have a few weeks in the field to start looking over what I have done so far to begin connecting the dots Chances are I ll also have most of week 10 to work on my abstract and poster but my goal is to get a rough outline for my abstract done next week This week I ve been continuing my work with the move out plots trying to come up with decent velocity models for the basin region It is a very tedious process of changing numbers in a text file seeing how they look on a move out plot comparing this to the real data making corrections this is the hard part and repeating the process until the synthetic model looks close to the data So far I made a rough model for the Illinois basin below station R44A that matches fairly well for the shallow structures The real data is on the left and my synthetic model is on the right On the x axis is ray parameter which tells us about the incidence angle of the incoming P wave and on the y axis is the time after the direct P wave arrival The red represents positively polarized arrivals while the blue are negative arrivals What you are looking at are arrivals of direct P to S wave conversions and their reverberations in the crust which tell us about the structures referred to as converters in the crust We are mainly interested in looking at the fine shallow structure of the basin closer to the bottom on the picture and seeing how these structures can impact the Moho signal that we are seeing I have found that there are many ways to model some of the structures in the crust so Hersh has been helping me sort out which possibilities are more likely in reality The model shown above has 5 layers 3 of which are less than a meter in thickness which would usually be considered too thin to include when modeling receiver functions It turns out these thin shallow layers sort of trap the wave energy as it reverberates causing some very complicated signals that appear later in time and therefore appear to be deeper in the crust Now that I have this basic model for the basin I will try to model the crust outside of the basin area in Missouri to compare the differences Hopefully in the next week I will be able to make some connections between the crustal structures of the basin compared to the regions outside of the basin Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 5 Making friends with Matlab July 5th 2013 My first week in Lafayette was definitely a good one We are no longer living in a house with 6 other people and I m actually sleeping in a bed Also there is a free trolley that goes to and from campus near the house so I won t have to buy a 28 bus pass for the month Though realistically I ll probably just spend it all on food anyway Speaking of food Lafayette doesn t have quite the selection that Bloomington had Today I ate lunch at an Indian restaurant called Khana Khazana and while it was pretty good it was a little pricey It looks like that 28 will be drying up pretty quickly here This week I continued with my data processing in Matlab Hersh gave me a few new scripts to play with that allowed me to look at my data a bit differently I am now able to plot arrival times of the converted phases as a function of ray parameter for each station This is useful because the relation between arrival time and ray parameter varies with the depth that the conversion took place and that s ultimately what I am interested in I can then try to match the trends to the theoretical values for different velocities and depths to make a velocity model that matches the data I m also doing some forward modeling where I create a velocity modeling and run a program to generate synthetic data I can then plug that synthetic data into the same Matlab script to see how it looks compared to the real data If I am able to get a synthetic model that matches the real data then that should be a good indication that we are using an accurate enough velocity model Also we finally talked with Kevin from the Indiana Geological Survey to get some information about the structure of the Illinois Basin He has a very elaborate 3D 7 layer model that describes the stratigraphy of the basin which we will incorporate into our velocity models We will be trying to simplify this into a 2 or 3 layer model with the help of Gary back at IU This week I ve been creating velocity models with different numbers of layers and running synthetic data to get a feeling for what happens for different numbers of layers in the model Hopefully next we will be able to work more with information from the 3D model to get a better idea for how we can simplify it for our needs Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 4 Goodbye Bloomington hello Purdue June 29th 2013 As week 4 at Indiana University comes to a close Bradley and I are getting ready to head to Purdue for the remainder of the summer I ve really enjoyed our time here in Bloomington and will miss the awesome ethnic food and hiking nearby Not to mention Dr Pavlis has been an amazingly patient mentor especially with my less than impressive computer skills We are only a month into our internship but I already feel that I have learned so much I am beginning to make progress in my project and notice myself slowly becoming more comfortable with the computer work Although I ll miss some aspects of Bloomington I m excited to see what West Lafayette has to offer Not to mention Bradley and I have been living in a house with 7 guys and sleeping on air mattresses for a month Needless to say it has been interesting but I m definitely looking forward to living in a clean house and sleeping in an actual bed Also I m looking forward to having a new town to explore new food to try and a new computer screen to stare at This week I ve mostly been working on processing receiver functions for both 2012 and 2013 data in Matlab I ve also been reading and writing many many MANY emails Dr Gilbert is at Purdue so we ve been corresponding via email He has been connecting remotely to our database so we are able to exchange files that way Overall it is pretty inefficient but has actually forced me to learn quite a bit on my own which I think is often the most effective way to learn Because I am working with a lot of data remotely I have gotten much more comfortable using the Unix terminal to maneuver around the database Also while I haven t actually had to write any of my own Matlab code yet I m starting to gain a better understanding of what different pieces of code actually do As a physics major with very little geology background I was worried coming into this internship that I wouldn t understand anything in my project After all how could I possibly contribute anything to OIINK having taken only a single introductory geology class I certainly have struggled with some of the geology jargon but I m finally beginning to see how my project fits into the larger OIINK investigation and why it is important Fortunately I haven t been totally in the dark though I have been able to apply much of the wave theory that I learned last semester in my optics class It turns out waves act very similar whether they are electromagnetic and emitting from a laser or mechanical and passing through the earth s interior Because I think it is good practice to try explaining new things I will now bore you with some details of the data processing Actually I think it is really cool and hopefully I can convince you of that with the help of some pretty pictures After getting the files into the correct format the first step for processing receiver functions was picking the good traces to be used for each station Shown below are receiver functions for the station Q46A plotted using a Matlab script Each trace represents a different earthquake event and the peaks are energy amplitudes of various P wave to S wave conversions arriving at the radial component of the seismometer The goal here was to get rid of bad noisy red traces so that only the accurate ones were left Once all the bad traces were removed the good traces were stacked or averaged into one representative trace and migrated from time to depth as shown below The strong peak at 55km depth indicates a sharp discontinuity in the earth and represents the crust mantle boundary Moho below the Q46A station I repeated this for each of the 2012 and 2013 stations and then combined them to make a 2 D cross section which shows the depth of the Moho or in other words the crustal thickness In a perfectly simple world the figure shown above would indicate a thickening of the crust at around 200km The problem is that there are many other complexities in the crust that could be causing this apparent thickening For example these calculated depths are based on arrival times of different phases and therefore anything that affects the travel time appears as a change in the crustal thickness There could actually just be a slow area in the shallow crust causing delayed travel times that APPEAR as thickening This is exactly the type of thing that we will be trying to sort out in the next few weeks The next steps in the processing 1 Try to identify smaller scale structures beneath the OIINK array Due to the dense sampling of the array we should be able to resolve structures in more detail 2 Compare the receiver function signals with surface structures such as the edges of the Illinois Basin to see if there is any correlation 3 Stack the 2 D cross sections into a 3 D volume in paraview This is a matter of converting Matlab data point matrices into something that can be imported into paraview We are still unsure exactly how to do this but I m looking forward to getting my hands dirty with some coding in the near future Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 3 Slowly but surely June 21st 2013 This week has been my most challenging so far but I ve definitely learned a lot Dr Pavlis was away at a workshop this week leaving Bradley and I to fend for ourselves for a few days so I took this as an opportunity to really get comfortable with Unix and the structure of the database we are working with With the help of Dr Gilbert and Google I worked on some raw data processing in Unix to get our waveform data which we collected from the field last week into a form that we can actually work with First I had to merge the miniseed data files into the directory containing the OIINK 2013 data Once this was done I was able to rebuild the 2013 wfdisc which contains all of the waveform data in a nicely organized text document At this stage the data is now prepared and ready to be manipulated further by other programs I tried really hard to make this all sound impressive but in reality all I had to do was edit some scripts to do most of the work for me With that being said I m a complete noob to Unix and this took me over a day to do Just trying to maneuver my way around the database figure out the scripts and NOT accidently delete all of our newly acquired data was a task in its own The good news is that I feel much more comfortable with Unix and moving data remotely between the computers Now that Dr Pavlis is back I m beginning to get into the real data processing for my project The programs I ll mainly be using are SAC Matlab respknt pwaveqn ParaView and others I probably don t know about yet I ll be using Matlab to make the initial velocity models Then I ll run the velocity models through respknt which calculates the earth s response to the incoming waves Next I run pwaveqn to deconvolve the earth response into receiver functions and use SAC to plot the receiver functions This leaves me with synthetic receiver functions that I can compare with the real data As for the real data I m not completely sure how the processing works yet but I know that I ll be using Matlab to pick the best traces and make stacks for each of the stations Once all of my data is processed I ll be converting the files into ParaView compatible files for 3D visualization I played around with ParaView a little and it s an amazing tool I ll have to post pictures once I get my final model Food update Last night Bradley and I ate at a local pizza place called Mother Bear s We had heard that it was pretty good but it was actually amazing We got the Straits of Gibraltar which was made with olive tapenade mozzarella banana peppers red onions fresh spinach and feta Probably the best tasting pizza I ve ever consumed Tonight I was wandering around the campus and noticed people flocking towards the eastern part so I decided to see what was going on It turned out the IU Art Museum was having live music by an R B funk blues band called The Dynamics Although I was one of the few people under the age of 40 it was pretty cool It was outside on the rooftop by some interesting sculptures and there was free food so naturally I indulged The food was good the music even better I d call it a successful night Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 2 First Taste of Fieldwork June 14th 2013 This week has been a mixture of lab and field work From Tuesday through Thursday we were in the field collecting data from a few of the stand alone OIINK stations While most of the

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/80 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Brandon Schow
    time to fix it anyways it looks much better full quality This shows the parameters of the best quality data from my study arranged by backathimuth The top plot shows that there is a change in fast direction with back azimuth My current non fieldwork job is to investigate this Black flies skeeter bites however itchy they are don t ruin nice days Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 6 July 26th 2013 I miss sleep It s the second day of fieldwork but it feels like a reenactment of orientation week read trying to sleep every chance I get but I m sure I ll be able to catch up sometime Other than that it s been cool except we really haven t started the fieldwork at all yet Right now we have 18 seismometers sitting in a basement picking up the music and dancing that is happening next door I have no idea what s going on there but a lot of violin and cheering it sounds pretty exciting We re testing all of the instruments that IRIS sent us So far I think everything is looking alright We did have one seismograph that doesn t work because the pins in a port are bent and are looking unfixable Also we did not recieve any mounting brackets for the solar panels but we sent some of the team to the store to come up with something to get around that problem We may start our first installation later this afternoon just digging a hole and laying concrete I would be overjoyed to get a nap in sometime before then it would improve my enjoyment of everything significantly Thinking earlier a good haiku came to mind now gone forever Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Week 5 July 19th 2013 This week has been mostly cleaning up the data I have and preparing my laptop for fieldwork I ve been trying to load all the software I ve been using so I can work on my data in the field It s been kind of a hassle but I ve learned a lot about Linux in the process which has been nice I m also trying to learn some GMT so I can plot mantle flow predictions against shear wave splitting in Eastern Canada GMT is a bit of a syntaxual nightmare Every command needs about 5 2000 modifier things not sure what the technical term is and each of those has from what I ve picked up on close to infinite possiblities of input People say it s great once you ve figured it out It does make pretty plots but the learning curve seems pretty intense Someone who has a lot of time on their hands and a big heart should make a GUI for it But considering it s been around for 25 years it s probably not gonna get one anytime soon so I should just hunker down

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/81 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Emily Sexton
    matlab and SPW installed and immense amount of help from Bob I now have three computer screens and two computers one that has matlab and unix and the other that has SPW I have been going through matlab and unix tutorials trying to learn more about the programs Additionally I have done some reading on SPW but have found that the interface between SPW and the version that we have here SPW3 is quite different Cathy gave me the manual for SPW3 and I have been trying to work my way through it but so far I am still having troubles figuring out the program The vibroseis survey is planned for next tuesday and wednesday July 9 10 but hopefully we will be able to complete it in one day As we are unable to access one of the sites we will only be conducting the survey at the other site We will be conducting the survey with some people from UNLV and we will be using their equipment Last week we went over to the university to take a look at the cables and the mini vibe truck I have completed surveys before at school using a betsy gun and at orientation using a weight drop but I have never done a vibroseis before so I am very excited to see how the truck works Although safe from snakes inside the building I have learned that you have to be on the lookout for cockroaches around here as they make frequent appearances We also caught a lizard the other day that was trying to escape the heat and set him loose outside My mom came into town this weekend so my family made a trip up to Bryce Canyon It was a great opportunity to get some hiking in although we did come across a rattlesnake on the trail who let us know that he didnt want us to be there Despite the minor set back the hike through the famous canyon was quite spectacular Link to Post Comment on this Post 0 Comments Working at the test site June 21st 2013 These past two weeks have been extremely busy working at the test site Between waking up at 4 am and the 2 5 hour commute to where we are working I have had little time for anything besides working eating and sleeping Despite being exhausting I have found the work at the site SPE Climax extremely interesting Last week I was able to gather a lot more information about the experiment through reading and talking to people Cathy and I sat down and she explained the entire experiment to me and how I will contribute to it I was also able to sit down with a geologist at the site to learn about the geology of the area Basically for Phase I the granite with multpile faults and an abormally high water table caused many problems with the experiment For Phase II I will help to conduct

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/user/82 (2015-11-11)
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