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  • IRIS Internship Program - Results vs Debugging
    been running in the background But thus far here are a few event relocations to show that something is doing something We just now have to ensure what is doing how it is doing and that we can put hundreds of events and dozens of stations through it Here are a couple of spatial relocations relocating Here is MATLAB crashing 1 hour into running A few weeks before our field work we got a call from a mountain biker that found one of our stations in a state of disrepair When we got there we discovered that a new road had been made only a few feet from the site and the instruments were discovered and the battery was stolen It is pretty hilarious if you see the seismogram of the whole thing At 6 11 you can see someone driving up then getting out and walking around at 6 12 Then discovers the instruments and slides around unplugging things and running amok at 6 14 and the whole thing goes offline at 6 18 You have to wonder about some peoples psychology to drive up on a scientific instrument and steal materials in 7 minutes We checked the rest

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/results_vs_debugging (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - A coming together
    abstracts looming overhead in the next couple weeks we have had a push in the right direction After spending so much time of wading through seismology papers picking arrival times and paperwork it is really exciting to finally start writing some code The first code I have written gives the PNSN earthquake id s of earthquakes sorted by increasing hypocental distance given limitations on magnitude location and time While it is still rather simple it was nice to get my feet wet for hypoDD the double difference algorithm we are using Thus far we have just checked to make sure hypoDD runs well on a test file and that we have earthquake clusters of satisfactory spatial density Which we found both to be the case as you can see There were 1772 earthquakes around Mt St Helens on the PNSN network in the last year hypoDD is up and running on a test file awaiting all the real data we can throw at it This upcoming week we should have our preliminary results hopefully and a fair amount of our AGU abstracts written and submitted For this we have Matlab scripts that need to be modified for our data to

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/a_coming_together (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Indepedence in fieldwork and communicating research
    relatively decrepit GPS units Each morning we would wake up between 6 and 7 and head to breakfast where Geoff would give us our assigned stations for the day all the nessesary maps and a set of keys to access each locality We would split into different teams each day and promptly head out to attempt to get to each station often with success sometimes with humor and occasionally with a flat tire We would get back any time between 17 and 20 at night for dinner to begin planning for the next day discuss the technical issues we had dealt with that day and grumble about the local cuisine and heat 95 F 35 C This was the process everyday for about 11 days While our main focus was fieldwork during this period we still spoke about the academic methods and implications of our work Here I put some thought into how I may explain the work I am doing If I had to give an elevator talk it would start from the goal and come down to what I am doing Primarily we would like to locate the precise location of the magmatic structures under Mt St Helens for hazards reasons We are using tomography codes to find them And within this my part is to write code that will solve for exact earthquake times and locations x y z t Using this we can compare tt residuals to eventually create slowness contours Depending who is being addressed different sentances can be overlooked or elaborated upon here Here are all 70 stations This is a tomography paper I ve been struggling with Comments By Michael on July 13th 2015 Great start on the elevator talk The first sentence is solid and tells where and why nicely The next

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/indepedence_in_fieldwork_and_communicating_research (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - The first week in Seattle & goals
    building talking with my mentor Ken Creager and Carl Ulberg reading papers books and codes Learning more on using double difference to solve for location tomography and different topographic techniques ray theory as it pertains to travel times picking P wave arrivals on Antelope and of course the beloved inverse theory My goal for the first third of this summer is to become proficient in my understand in all of these and picking arrival times proficiently My goal for the second third of the summer is to work with all of this new found knowledge and apply it to the work I will be doing on this project and to become more proficient in Unix For the last third of the summer I would like to have everything pretty close to being finished and submit an abstract for AGU These goals will be refined in real time as I see how each of them is being accomplished Comments By Shawn Lee on June 20th 2015 That program looks very similar to what I m using Do you know what the name of it is perhaps I m curious if there s one program out there that all seismologists use or there are several different types By Michael on June 22nd 2015 Great post and pictures Sounds like it was a good week with a nice mix of some hands on field work and some time in the lab getting acquainted with the project The goals look like good ones and monitoring and adjusting those throughout the summer will be useful By Rob on June 22nd 2015 Looks like dB Pick in Antelope but I could be wrong Are you using the tomoDD code of Cliff Thurber That s what I used during my internship Fantastic pictures of Mount St Helens

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/the_first_week_in_seattle_goals (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Orientation Week
    This week at New Mexico Tech 11 undergrads from all over the USA met up for the first time to gather over interest in seismology taste in good food and confusion in graduate school We ended up bonding over our cultrual differences dorky love of sciences and how cozy we fit into vans 7 guys and 4 gals gathered under the illustrious Michael Hubenthal and rising Rob Anthony to overview

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/orientation_week8 (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Ending the Summer right with more Results and Fieldwork :)
    creating Receiver Functions I used that data to create Rose Diagrams In my last blog I talked about how Receiver Functions are sorted by back azimuths where 0 degrees is on the bottom and 360 is on the top The Rose diagrams takes a small time section and essentially cuts it out Then it plots the back azimuths not in a line but in continuous circle increasing degrees clockwise In the receiver functions I picked time windows that I thought showed a negative phase in the radial component or a 2 lobed or 4 lobed feature in the transverse component A 2 lobed feature is a feature that changes from negative to positive or positive to negative velocity after 180 degrees similarly a 4 lobed feature does the same only every 90 degrees A lobed feature indicates that there may be an anisotropic layer The goal is if I find a negative phase in the radial component and a lobed feature in the transverse component after the Moho usually located around 6 seconds to indicate there might be a MLD I also modeled much of the crustal structure before the Moho There was a lot of possible anisotropy within the crust especially in the stations located on the Appalachian Mountains This is stations TZTN I first looked at the radial component and found a large negative phase that s was seen through multiple back azimuths I created a blue box of the time window I wanted to look at and then attempted to place the same time window on the transverse component It is hard to tell through the Reciever Function diagram where any anisotropy is present However when I then created a Rose diagram of transverse component within that time window you can easily see that there is a

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/ending_the_summer_right_with_more_results_and_fieldwork (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Starting to get Results!
    the right is the Transverse component the transverse component measures energy perpendicular to the radial component Here on the y axis is shows the back azimuth angl e ranging from 0 360 The seismograms with similar back azimuth angles are stacked together because they would have traveled almost the same path to reach the seismometer On the x axis is time The blue shows high velocity and the red shows low velocity The receiver function is showing how quickly the waves are traveling over time You can see a blue peak at 0 seconds where the P wave first arrive There another blue peak around 6 seconds which is the Moho a fast velocity zone If you rotate the picture seen below it looks like layers where 0 is the surface of the earth From the surface there are some rock causing red low velocity and then further down from the surface there is the moho causing a blue faster velocity zone What I am looking for is a low red velocity zone on the transverse component right hand graph after we see the Moho This low velocity zone could be the MLD Also these images are unmigrated this can cause slight shifts and make the images appear not to have the same velocity zones appear at the same time We are currently fixing our velocity code to create better models coming soon Comments By Rob on July 25th 2015 Hi Lauren looks you are making great progress and those plots look great Just to clarify we aren t looking at seismograms here right Are these the actual receiver functions where you have deconvolved the vertical from the horizontal components Are you looking at a wide range of backazimuths to attempt to see anisotropy Looks like there aren t any

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/starting_to_get_results (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS Internship Program - Working in the Field
    Ohio I would tell people that a seismometer is a machine that can measure earthquakes and vibrations it does not cause earthquake but records them when the do occur Although Ohio does not get very many earthquakes our sensors are so sensitive that they were able to record the Nepal Earthquake last April The community seemed excited about our project and that it was going to be in their hometown I felt that telling more people about our project was almost like outreach in which it helped informed more people about seismology and get them excited about science I really enjoyed being out in the field and learned so many new skills Below I wrote Lauren s Guide to Seismometer Deployment a complete list of different things I needed to do while in the field Seismometer Deployment Step 1 Dig a Hole 3ft deep this has to be deep enough to fit a barrel Estimated time 3 4 hours Step 2 Mix and Pour 2 bags of concrete into the hole Step 3 Place a barrel in the hole add one bag of concrete into barrel Step 4 Allow concrete to dry Draw an East west line to orientate the sensor Step 5 Place seismometer in barrel orientate and level Step 6 Dig a shallow hole to house action packer holds all the electronics Step 7 Create trenches that lead from the seismometer to the action packer and a trench leading to where the solar panel will be Step 8 Create the PVC pipes needed to connect and protect the wires Step 9 Build the solar panel Step 10 Place the DAS Breakout box Batteries Power Box and GPS into Action Packer follow directions on Station Installation Sheet Step 11 Connect wires Step 12 Close up barrel to protect seismometer

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/internship/blogs/entry/working_in_the_field (2015-11-11)
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