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  • IRIS - Search
    related data facilities utilized by a wide sector of the earth science community IRIS consists of three directorates Instrumentation Services IS Data Services DS and Education Public Outreach EPO Each directorate consists of various programs listed to the right INSTRUMENTATION SERVICES Global Seismographic Network GSN Portable Networks PASSCAL Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool OBSIP Transportable Array TA Magnetotelluric Array MT Polar Programs POLAR Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network GLISN Global Reporting Observatories in Chile GRO Chile DATA SERVICES Data Management Center DMC Data Collection Centers DCCs EDUCATION PUBLIC OUTREACH Explore Earthquake Data Learning Teaching Resources Learning Opportunities Public Outreach INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEISMOLOGY IDS EARTHQUAKES Recent earthquakes teachable moments Explore the world of earthquakes IRIS has multiple online tools that allow you to learn about global and regional seismicity Recent Earthquake Map Interactive earthquake Browser IEB Recent Earthquake Teachable Moments RETM View Seismograms Image Gallery ABOUT IRIS Organization governance news jobs annual reports Information about the IRIS organization and for IRIS Consortium members IRIS is a consortium of over 120 US universities dedicated to the operation of science facilities for the acquisition management and distribution of seismological data IRIS is a 501 c 3 nonprofit organization incorporated in the state of Delaware with its primary headquarters office located in Washington DC IRIS is governed according to By laws IRIS ORGANIZATION Vision Mission Strategic Plan Membership Governance By Laws Policies and Procedures Awards and Budget Codes Standing Committees Meeting Reports Secure Meetings Documents Staff Employment at IRIS Annual Reports Logos Citations Contact Us Directions IRIS CONSORTIUM News Community page Becoming a member Types of membership Map of current members How to cite IRIS Community Jobs Mailing Lists FAQs Travel Tips Directions Search RESOURCES Publications webinars posters newsletters proposals Digital print resources available IRIS offers a variety of resources for the seismological community

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/search/data_and_software (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS - Data Services One-Pagers
    listed to the right INSTRUMENTATION SERVICES Global Seismographic Network GSN Portable Networks PASSCAL Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool OBSIP Transportable Array TA Magnetotelluric Array MT Polar Programs POLAR Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network GLISN Global Reporting Observatories in Chile GRO Chile DATA SERVICES Data Management Center DMC Data Collection Centers DCCs EDUCATION PUBLIC OUTREACH Explore Earthquake Data Learning Teaching Resources Learning Opportunities Public Outreach INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEISMOLOGY IDS EARTHQUAKES Recent earthquakes teachable moments Explore the world of earthquakes IRIS has multiple online tools that allow you to learn about global and regional seismicity Recent Earthquake Map Interactive earthquake Browser IEB Recent Earthquake Teachable Moments RETM View Seismograms Image Gallery ABOUT IRIS Organization governance news jobs annual reports Information about the IRIS organization and for IRIS Consortium members IRIS is a consortium of over 120 US universities dedicated to the operation of science facilities for the acquisition management and distribution of seismological data IRIS is a 501 c 3 nonprofit organization incorporated in the state of Delaware with its primary headquarters office located in Washington DC IRIS is governed according to By laws IRIS ORGANIZATION Vision Mission Strategic Plan Membership Governance By Laws Policies and Procedures Awards and Budget Codes Standing Committees Meeting Reports Secure Meetings Documents Staff Employment at IRIS Annual Reports Logos Citations Contact Us Directions IRIS CONSORTIUM News Community page Becoming a member Types of membership Map of current members How to cite IRIS Community Jobs Mailing Lists FAQs Travel Tips Directions Search RESOURCES Publications webinars posters newsletters proposals Digital print resources available IRIS offers a variety of resources for the seismological community and general public including online interactive materials regular newsletters brochures webinars past event materials We also offer digital copies of our proposals and reviews for download Publications Annual Reports Brochures and Information Sheets Newsletters Proposals

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/publications/brochures_and_onepagers/data (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS - Educational Fact Sheets
    Global Reporting Observatories in Chile GRO Chile DATA SERVICES Data Management Center DMC Data Collection Centers DCCs EDUCATION PUBLIC OUTREACH Explore Earthquake Data Learning Teaching Resources Learning Opportunities Public Outreach INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEISMOLOGY IDS EARTHQUAKES Recent earthquakes teachable moments Explore the world of earthquakes IRIS has multiple online tools that allow you to learn about global and regional seismicity Recent Earthquake Map Interactive earthquake Browser IEB Recent Earthquake Teachable Moments RETM View Seismograms Image Gallery ABOUT IRIS Organization governance news jobs annual reports Information about the IRIS organization and for IRIS Consortium members IRIS is a consortium of over 120 US universities dedicated to the operation of science facilities for the acquisition management and distribution of seismological data IRIS is a 501 c 3 nonprofit organization incorporated in the state of Delaware with its primary headquarters office located in Washington DC IRIS is governed according to By laws IRIS ORGANIZATION Vision Mission Strategic Plan Membership Governance By Laws Policies and Procedures Awards and Budget Codes Standing Committees Meeting Reports Secure Meetings Documents Staff Employment at IRIS Annual Reports Logos Citations Contact Us Directions IRIS CONSORTIUM News Community page Becoming a member Types of membership Map of current members How to cite IRIS Community Jobs Mailing Lists FAQs Travel Tips Directions Search RESOURCES Publications webinars posters newsletters proposals Digital print resources available IRIS offers a variety of resources for the seismological community and general public including online interactive materials regular newsletters brochures webinars past event materials We also offer digital copies of our proposals and reviews for download Publications Annual Reports Brochures and Information Sheets Newsletters Proposals and Reviews Workshop and Meeting Reports USArray and EarthScope Publications Posters Events Workshops Short Courses Webinars Calendar Educational Resources Teachable Moments For The Classroom Video Lecture Series Public Displays Animations Seismographs in Schools Seismogram Viewer USArray Wave Visualizations Teacher Professional Development Image Gallery Home Publications Brochures And Onepagers Edu Educational Fact Sheets The IRIS E O program has created one page handouts related to seismology for use in the classroom or public information forums These Fact Sheets are available upon request from IRIS Headquarters or you can download Adobe Acrobat pdf formatted copies of these high quality handouts from this page Ahora tambien tenemos la versión en Español To request E O materials please send an email to EandOproduct iris edu with the following information Names of item s you are requesting along with respective quantities Please list posters and one pagers on separate lines Full mailing address including phone number where the materials should be sent Indicate what purpose the materials will be serving Date materials are needed by if applicable PLEASE NOTE Time sensitive requests must be sent at least three weeks before the date they are needed When e mailing a time sensitive request please write Time Sensitive Request in the subject line IRIS also has several educational posters available for order No 1 Watch Earthquakes as they Occur An Introduction to the Seismic Monitor In English download 260 kb pdf

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/publications/brochures_and_onepagers/edu (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS - Newsletters
    various programs listed to the right INSTRUMENTATION SERVICES Global Seismographic Network GSN Portable Networks PASSCAL Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool OBSIP Transportable Array TA Magnetotelluric Array MT Polar Programs POLAR Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network GLISN Global Reporting Observatories in Chile GRO Chile DATA SERVICES Data Management Center DMC Data Collection Centers DCCs EDUCATION PUBLIC OUTREACH Explore Earthquake Data Learning Teaching Resources Learning Opportunities Public Outreach INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEISMOLOGY IDS EARTHQUAKES Recent earthquakes teachable moments Explore the world of earthquakes IRIS has multiple online tools that allow you to learn about global and regional seismicity Recent Earthquake Map Interactive earthquake Browser IEB Recent Earthquake Teachable Moments RETM View Seismograms Image Gallery ABOUT IRIS Organization governance news jobs annual reports Information about the IRIS organization and for IRIS Consortium members IRIS is a consortium of over 120 US universities dedicated to the operation of science facilities for the acquisition management and distribution of seismological data IRIS is a 501 c 3 nonprofit organization incorporated in the state of Delaware with its primary headquarters office located in Washington DC IRIS is governed according to By laws IRIS ORGANIZATION Vision Mission Strategic Plan Membership Governance By Laws Policies and Procedures Awards and Budget Codes Standing Committees Meeting Reports Secure Meetings Documents Staff Employment at IRIS Annual Reports Logos Citations Contact Us Directions IRIS CONSORTIUM News Community page Becoming a member Types of membership Map of current members How to cite IRIS Community Jobs Mailing Lists FAQs Travel Tips Directions Search RESOURCES Publications webinars posters newsletters proposals Digital print resources available IRIS offers a variety of resources for the seismological community and general public including online interactive materials regular newsletters brochures webinars past event materials We also offer digital copies of our proposals and reviews for download Publications Annual Reports Brochures and Information Sheets

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/publications/newsletters (2015-11-11)
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  • Twenty-Seven Month Proposal
    below are components of the three large documents just above The Accomplishments volume is comprised mostly of one page project descriptions A table of links to individual project descriptions in HTML format is available Appendix Program Sections GSN 1357KB PASSCAL 1061KB DMS 354KB E O 465KB USArray 887KB IDS 504KB Polar 557KB Accomplishments Table of Contents 56 KB Introduction Topic Summaries 2608 KB Education and Outreach 2000 KB Earthquake Source

    Original URL path: http://www.iris.edu/hq/NSFProposal/ (2015-11-11)
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  • IRIS - Workshops
    less familiar in What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond The innovative approach of the IRIS facility and its founders of creating a pool of seismic instruments that any NSF funded PI can use and the storage of open access data transformed seismology in the U S and has served as a model to the rest of the world These features democratized seismology and allow any researcher with a laptop to perform relevant seismology research in their field of expertise Yet it is still common that many undergraduate students are not exposed to geophysics or research at all that graduate students use similar analysis methods to their mentors and one s future realm of expertise is typically formed by the courses taken as an undergraduate and graduate A new facility that supported a wide range of software course materials and training materials would enable a much wider range of research and a broaden the training students outside large and relatively wealthy geoscience departments receive Consider for instance on line or in person training that would allow any motivated student such as a physics student at a community college to learn common seismological data analysis procedures and perform real research with a facility provided mentor or how much a teaching repository of quality upper level courses or course modules could enable a wider variety of geophysics being taught at small institutions or an open access seismology e textbook that incorporates simulations and a full derivation and explanation of all equations Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors David Voorhees Keywords education science literacy Title Bringing seismology to everyone Email dvoorhees waubonsee edu First Name David What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international There needs to be continued improvement in bringing real time seismology to as many as possible This includes continued development and improvement of jAmaseis and InClass In its current version jAmaseis is an important step in allowing real time seismic data viewable over the internet However there are some issues that need to be addressed as well as providing quick and reliable technical support To that end there needs to be full time support dedicated solely to jAmases and SIS issues Regional networks are a start but there will be many entities not able to join or become part of a present or nascent Regional Seismic Network InClass can be argued as a starting point to a fully engaged populace in seismology as a fully functional and well promoted InClass would be able to easily support the currently flummoxed K 12 instructors trying to initiate the Next Generation Science Standards A fully engaged K 12 teacher populace could lead to a fully engaged K 12 student population as well as potentially identifying future seismologists In addition to the InClass opportunities a robust version of Seismographs in Schools SIS can be transformative Witnessing a seismic event being recorded real time IN a classroom by students can be transformative Imagine the effect of viewing an event and then being able to communicate with other students or a seismic expert after that event or during it using twitter or some other rapid communication method Last Name Voorhees What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond As our society becomes more and more technologically advanced so does the understanding of the world around us In this world of ubiquitous iPhones and twitter the ability to obtain real time information becomes easier and easier To that end I think that the development and promotion of real time seismic data and seismology to any and all interested parties can be transformative to the science of seismology It could be argued that earthquakes are as engaging to a majority of the public as are dinosaurs to young children Leveraging that initial interest after major seismic events or long term trends i e hydraulic fracturing into an overall improved understanding of the earth through seismology can be a step in the right direction to increasing the overall scientific literacy of the United States currently at an embarrassingly low level at least in the opinion of this geoscience educator At a recent meeting of the Advisory Committee for the Geosciences Directorate of NSF an extended topic of discussion was ways to document a return on investment of NSF Research funds It could be argued that a well engaged population in the science of seismology is an excellent ROI Additionally this well engaged population would make inroads into elevating the low level of respect that the geosciences have been receiving of late in the media and Congress What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond To enable these real time seismological modalities a well designed website will be critical If it is truly important to expose the non seismologist to seismology the IRIS web page needs to be user friendly to the non seismologist much as it is now When an earthquake occurs the new user of the website will need to be able to find information data and other resources appropriate to that event Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors Jeff Ryan Rick Bennett Bruce Douglas Lisa Ely Andrew Goodwillie Jay Cassidy David Schmidt Becca Walker Keywords Diversity RESESS Title Diversification of the Seismic and Geodetic Workforce as a Core Broader Impact of Any Future Facility Email ryan mail usf edu First Name Jeffrey What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international Any successor facility seeking to support the geodesy and or seismology research communities will need to continue play a key facilitative role in fostering diversity through outreach to students from under represented groups to introduce them to these fields and through the longer term support of interested students through research experiences and efforts to mentor them into these professions The scale of these efforts and the time commitments required for their success argue for a centralized community supported approach that a facility is uniquely able to provide Diversity focused activities need to be central to the broader impacts mission of any future facility supporting these disciplines and arguably to the missions of any Federally funded research support facility Last Name Ryan What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond N A What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond A critical benefit arising from facility support for the geodesy and seismology research communities has been the ability to foster long term community scale efforts to engage students from communities and demographic groups that are under represented in STEM fields Effective diversity outreach activities involve extensive mentoring and support for students who usually come from challenged circumstances and lower performing schools provisions for extended support over time in their academic careers to get these students past recognized hurdles on their way through degree programs and a long term commitment to providing such opportunities so as to establish working relationships with other institutions and projects with similar goals and to move the needle in terms of numbers given the extensive individual investments required The RESESS program overseen by UNAVCO is a type example of a successful long lived diversity outreach effort that leverages the expertise of the UNAVCO facility and its PI community to provide transformative research experiences to under represented students Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors Jeff Ryan Rick Bennett Bruce Douglas Lisa Ely Andrew Goodwillie Jay Cassidy David Schmidt Becca Walker Title Workforce Development can should be supported by future research facilities Email ryan mail usf edu First Name Jeffrey What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international The coordination of sustainable internship and or undergraduate research programs is a large job that is outside the purview and capabilities of most academic departments so initiating and running such programs often falls to the very largest departments or institutions or it is supported through consortium efforts e g the Keck Consortium Federally supported research facilities can fulfill this need for the disciplinary areas they support handling the substantial logistics component of such programs and using their network of participating investigators to ensure that students obtain rich and engaging research experiences and that they begin developing a professional network that will support them into graduate school and ideally to the Ph D As such any future facility supporting seismic and or geodetic research should have as part of its portfolio of Broader Impacts activities an effort to develop and coordinate undergraduate research and or internship programs for their communities Last Name Ryan What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond N A What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond A key Federal objective in the support of STEM education is the training of the future STEM workforce specifically in the case of NSF the future Ph D workforce in the sciences IRIS and UNAVCO have played important parts in this effort through the coordination and facilitation of internship and research opportunities for undergraduate students helping to introduce them to the fields of seismology and geodesy and connecting them to Ph D professionals in these fields first as mentors and later as future graduate advisors The new GeoLaunchPad project at UNAVCO seeks to reach interested students at an even earlier stage in their undergraduate careers engaging them in geodetic remote sensing research experiences during their first two years in college both to hook them on the discipline and to encourage their persistence in STEM fields overall Select Whitepaper Category Global Regional Structure Rheology and Geodynamics Authors Derek Schutt Christian Poppeliers Keywords education early career Title Early Career Investigator Activities at IRIS Email harmony colella asu edu First Name Harmony What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international As described above professional development for ECIs is essential to maximize their potential Notably not all ECIs have equal access to mentoring professional connections teaching materials and research software regardless of their capabilities and a new facility could readily provide an equality of access and a commensurate equality of opportunity especially for ECIs from smaller financially limited or non research oriented institutions that currently is lacking Moreover it is imperative particularly in the current domestic economic government funding and employment climate that the next large scale community wide facility or facilities provide s a broader awareness for ECIs of all potential employment options ECIs need guidance on how to frame the skills and technical expertise acquired through a geoscience education to make them marketable for any career path Many students are only exposed to career paths in academics or the oil gas energy industry and this only at certain universities while many employment opportunities exist outside of these arenas The existence of an ECI specific entity or component of an Education and Outreach Program within the new facility would expand the opportunities available to ECIs and reduce some of the barriers that have contributed to reducing the diversity of professional geophysicists and geodesists Last Name Colella What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond See below What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond Early career investigators ECIs loosely defined as senior graduate students through pre tenure faculty are the next generation of scientists those that will heavily rely on the next generation of large scale community wide consortium to succeed For instance ECIs must develop confidence as independent researchers and establish collaborations beyond their initial advisors and colleagues Many ECIs also become classroom instructors despite limited teacher training in graduate school Additionally many ECIs experience minimal mentoring and guidance making an already difficult transitional period more stressful In effort to lower the barriers that hinder newly minted or soon to be scientists researchers and educators from thriving in a diverse range of career paths the new infrastructure should include a program that supports the development of ECIs Key aspects of this program should 1 organize practical resources and professional development opportunities for ECIs as they complete graduate school navigate post docs and other temporary research positions apply to permanent jobs in and outside academia etc and develop as managers administrators or apply for tenure 2 foster an ECI community and resources that can be virtually housed within the facility 3 provide experience knowledge and funding opportunities e g conferences travel funds for individual research projects and 4 potentially build and provide a mentoring network for ECIs Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors Michael Oskin and Greg Beroza Keywords Earthquake response geodesy seismology lidar Title SAGE GAGE Rapid Scientific Response to Earthquakes Email meoskin ucdavis edu First Name Michael What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international Rapid scientific response to strong damaging earthquakes within the United States is essential to the missions of the SAGE and GAGE facilities Post earthquake rapid scientific response will be most effective if it is a team effort that spans the earthquake research community As research consortiums SAGE and GAGE are natural catalysts for fostering community response efforts in seismology and geodesy respectively Last Name Oskin What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond Major earthquakes present valuable opportunities to improve physics based understanding of earthquake phenomena Post earthquake field data collection efforts must commence as quickly as possible while aftershocks transient motions and surface rupture are strongest and best expressed 1 Aftershock frequency decays quickly Because aftershocks illuminate many aspects of fault zone structure and its post seismic evolution it is critical to enhance aftershock monitoring with additional instrumentation as soon as possible Quick instrument deployment alsoincreases the chances of capturing the nucleation process of a large aftershock 2 Rapid geodetic measurements especially within the near field are needed to separate post seismic afterslip from coseismic displacement Where permanent station coverage is sparse significant effort and equipment will be needed to survey campaign benchmarks around the rupture 3 Post seismic deformation is a natural experiment for probing the rheology of the lithosphere with tectonic geodesy Like aftershocks post seismic deformation decays rapidly as well so the sooner that the rupture trace and its endpoints are defined and the sooner that instruments are deployed the better the results 4 Fault zone imaging with terrestrial lidar and structure from motion techniques should commence as soon as possible before fragile features decay or are destroyed What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond There are two realms of rapid scientific response to earthquakes for which the SAGE and GAGE facilities should be prepared 1 managing access to data products from permanent station networks operated by the facilities and 2 making field instrumentation available for immediate post earthquake response Both tasks require time and resources that need to be considered in planning for the facilities Ideally after a major earthquake SAGE seismometers and GAGE campaign geodesy and terrestrial lidar instrumentation will be in place and surveys underway within one day of the event origin time Some ways that the SAGE and GAGE could prepare ahead of time for a rapid scientific response to a major earthquake include 1 Develop a strategy document for post earthquake instrument deployment including consideration ahead of time of at what level the interruption of another ongoing experiment moving instruments is warranted 2 Develop coordination plans ahead of time with partner institutions in the various states with earthquake activity and as appropriate with the U S Geological Survey 3 Include initial rapid response as part of the core facility funding so that the initial and most critical response is not delayed by funding uncertainty 4 Consider housing some field equipment at locations along the west coast where it can be deployed as quickly as possible after an earthquake Select Whitepaper Category Fault and Volcano Systems Whitepaper Image Upload figure jpg Authors David Sandwell David Chadwell Dan Basset Bruce Applegate Image Caption Time series of the orientation of the RV Revelle acquired during a 2003 GPS A cruise at the Juan de Fuca Ridge High rate data blue line were acquired by a system consisting of geodetic GPS measurements attitude sensed from laser ring gyroscopes and linear velocities from accelerometers Lower rate orientation data red dots were acquired by three geodetic GPS receivers two on the stern and one on the bridge The GPS data capture the full 3 D ship motions to an accuracy of 10 cm Keywords seafloor geodesy subduction zone processes kinematic GPS Title Need for high rate high accuracy ship positioning and orientation measurements Email dsandwell ucsd edu First Name David What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international We propose that at least 3 high accuracy GPS receivers be placed on all UNOLS vessels to support both the well established GPS A investigations as well as the emerging surface sonar methods UNAVCO has the technical experience to deploy and archive data from high accuracy high rate GPS sensors in a variety of extreme environments such as the Antarctic ice and other remote locations having little infrastructure We believe UNAVCO should develop the expertise to deploy and archive the position and orientation of all UNOLS vessels to support the emerging geodetic and seismic applications As shown in Figure 1 the GPS sensors can augment the real time ship orientation that is currently supplied with multibeam sonars Last Name Sandwell What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond One of the eight high level science questions posed in the recent NRC Decadal Report NRC 2015 was How can risk be better characterized and the ability to forecast geohazards like mega earthquakes tsunamis undersea landslides and volcanic eruptions be improved The tools of GPS and InSAR are used to monitor crustal deformation onshore but in the Cascadia Subduction Zone the locked portion of the megathrust is suggested to lie entirely offshore The up dip limit of the seismogenic zone which is the most important for tsunami generation is particularly poorly constrained by onshore observations and the ability to monitor surface deformation offshore is a key component of characterizing the likely dimensions hazards and underlying physical properties associated with the Cascadia seismogenic zone What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond GPS Acoustics GPS A and self calibrating pressure recorders SCPR offer cm accuracy for horizontal and vertical positioning respectively but require significant ship expenses and recurring visits for maintenance of seafloor equipment We are investigating the possibility of decimeter level accuracy positioning of seafloor patches using sidescan data that is routinely collected by multibeam sonars on UNOLS vessels One of the main limitations of the archive multibeam data is that the standard GPS equipment does not achieve the centimeter accuracy needed for monitoring the ship location Moreover the positions of the transponders and hydrophones on the hull of the ship undergo significant high frequency 10 seconds motions associated with the roll pitch and yaw of the ship Figure 1 Select Whitepaper Category Fault and Volcano Systems Authors Stefany Sit Keywords K 12 education undergraduate training broaden participation teaching resources Title Educational Resources in Schools and for the Public Email ssit uic edu First Name Stefany What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international Planning for our future needs I see top priorities as a education and training for undergraduate and graduate students and b education and outreach for K 12 and the general public We should capitalize on our disciplines vast datasets and computational analysis Therefore I strongly believe in the development of a teaching repository and online software mini courses This would allow students and faculty from research universities small liberal arts schools community colleges and international schools an opportunity to learn cutting edge techniques from academia and industry Efforts to create better teaching resources can be used for all types of students and would help broaden representation in our field An additional priority would be outreach to public communities and schools meeting our audience through technology with an easy to use website smart phone apps software development of jAmaseis and InClass to help bring awareness and prestige to the seismic and geodetic fields Especially as more K 12 schools adopt the Next Generation Science Standards it will be important to show how our topics intertwine crosscutting concepts and Science and engineering practices Last Name Sit What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond My current interests are in geoscience education Key questions include how can we effectively teach and train undergraduates in scientific analysis and what are effective pathways to introduce and support students in geoscience majors Within the field of seismology and geodesy there are opportunities to better evaluate and assess how our students are learning on how well they understand the disciplines critical concepts What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond Attracting the curiosity of students at an early age while also focusing on the training of undergraduate and graduate students can provide the foundation for a more diverse and innovative workforce in seismology and geodesy Foundationally the facilities have provided key educational resources for students of all ages like accessible data and easy software for K 12 teachers IRIS and RESESS internships professional development and student training and support for Early Career Investigators Continued efforts will make these resources more affordable and accessible to students from diverse and non traditional backgrounds The facilities also provide important means to help scientists and educators communicate and engage with the public through pamphlets video animations smart phone apps and museum displays which all help to elevate the prestige of our discipline Along with education and outreach efforts the facilities also have unique opportunities to facilitate the collection of education data assessment and research furthering our understanding of how the public and students conceptualize and learn key principles in our discipline Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors Stefany Sit Keywords IRIS internships undergraduate training Title IRIS internships and increasing access for undergraduates Email ssit uic edu First Name Stefany What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international To increase the number of well qualified and trained geoscientists the achievements of the IRIS internship program including computational training field experiences and camaraderie can be used to broaden participation and provide more opportunities for young scientists to get involved For instance future facilities can help develop and distribute mini lectures and or tutorials on seismic processing and analysis Perhaps the facility would host a supercomputer with basic versions of data processing and modeling available for different students to use Additionally the facility could act as a job volunteer matching site for seismic and geodetic field experiments A matching site may also be useful for researchers whose work is visually and manually intensive to find student help outside of their institution perhaps at community college or small liberal arts school Students could potentially find an on campus mentor and sign up for independent research hours once a match has been formed These steps can ensure we will have a diverse set of students being introduced to our discipline Last Name Sit What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond N A What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond The IRIS internship program is a well developed and executed program that continues to provide critical training experiences and support to a new generation of seismologists As a former intern I found that the internship program challenged me intellectually while providing social support Coming from a small liberal arts college I didn t have any exposure to seismology as an undergraduate but the program gave me snippets of seismic techniques and broad questions I could pursue in the field Moreover the internship program provided an academic community of mentors and peers that I could utilize as an intern and as I continued on in academia The IRIS facility provides a cohesive and friendly community that has fostered the development of young scientists Select Whitepaper Category Broader Impacts Authors Susan Schwartz Geoff Abers Ramon Arrowsmith Rob Evans Jeff Freymueller Jim Gaherty Haiying Gao Gabi Laske Stephen McNutt Emily Roland Doug Toomey Peter van Keken Doug Wiens Keywords amphibious array continent ocean boundary Title The Need for a Seismic Geodetic Facility to Support Coordinated Amphibious Science Email syschwar ucsc edu First Name Susan What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international Amphibious array deployments target coastlines of major societal risk Great subduction zone earthquakes generate large shaking and tsunamis Volatile rich subduction volcanoes exhibit high explosivity compounding the risks To understand and manage the hazards requires an amphibious integrative and multi disciplinary approach facilitated by coordinated community efforts When data from such a deployment can be transmitted and disseminated in real time the seismic and geodetic sensors will contribute to systems for earthquake tsunami and volcano monitoring This could include both traditional near real time earthquake location and truly real time earthquake early warning Data from the Cascadia deployment have already been used for these purposes The Cascadia deployment has demonstrated the broad impact of community driven science Community planned and managed experiments can be cost effective ways to achieve high overall scientific impact since a large PI community can be mobilized It is not limited to primary users but brings together diverse groups to study earth processes Open and rapid access to data likewise facilitates scientist involvement and enhances data quality control Community science enables early career scientists and students lowering barriers of access to sophisticated projects Overall individual PI contributions hang together as part of a larger synoptic effort enabling many synergies and more sophisticated approaches to the problems Last Name Schwartz What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond Significant and societally relevant systems in the solid earth cross continent ocean boundaries Their study requires amphibious projects with marine and terrestrial observation Critical systems include Subduction Factory and Magma Volatiles Crustal rocks magmas and other materials cycle through subduction zones As volatiles fluids and melts are stored transferred and released these cycles control the long term budget of H2O and CO2 and evolution of earth s crust and regulate the planet s most explosive volcanoes These cycles also significantly affect the rheology and dynamics of the crust and upper mantle Passive Margins and Transform Faults Passive margins record how rifting initiates and ocean basins form how critical magmatism is to continental breakup and what controls segmentation of rifts and ridges Transform margins offer excellent opportunities to directly sample major faults that reach the surface Seismogenic Processes at Subduction Margins Recent great earthquakes have highlighted our ignorance of megathrust rupture processes and tsunamigenesis such as the controls on spatial variability in rupture The few sea floor measurements off Tohoku Japan have clearly shown enormous slip magnitudes and strain transients remain intriguing features of many subduction zones Studying these systems relies upon simultaneous onshore and offshore seismic and geodetic observations because most interesting phenomena cross the shoreline What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond Amphibious sensor arrays are a critical component to understanding these earth systems The Amphibious Array Facilities presently deployed in Cascadia 2011 2015 offer a prototype of what could be done 60 OBSs 27 land seismic stations and 232 high sample rate GPS stations New technologies include OBS with current and trawl shielding atomic clocks accelerometers and absolute pressure gauges as well as high sample rate real time GPS onshore This project was designed and managed by open community workshops that coordinated deployment strategies and had rapid open data dissemination An evaluation of this facility along with recommendations for future deployments can be found in the Amphibious Arrays Facilities Workshop Report http geoprisms org wpdemo wp content uploads 2014 06 AAFW Report 2015 pdf Beyond the OBS and onshore facilities deployed at Cascadia several frontier capabilities are evident These include sea floor geodesy for both horizontal and vertical pressure displacement both passive and controlled source electromagnetic methods onshore and offshore complementary amphibious field geological observations scientific drilling and integrative geodynamical modeling While observational needs should be tailored to specific sites the basic principle of coordinated amphibious observation has tremendous potential We will need to combine onshore and offshore seismic and geodetic measurements to fully address the key scientific questions Select Whitepaper Category New Technologies Whitepaper Image Upload gage sage png Authors Kristine M Larson Keywords reflections Title Environmental Applications of GNSS soil moisture snow depth vegetation sea level volcanic ash Email kristinem larson gmail com First Name Kristine What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international UNAVCO is a leader in outreach training and workforce development of GNSS geodesy These new GNSS environmental applications also need strong support by UNAVCO both in training researchers and helping scientists choose GNSS sites that can be used for both positioning and reflections I think UNAVCO could also expand outreach via online tools rather than focused schools although those are useful as well A well made video or animation can be a great way to reach a lot of people And a final comment I operate two websites one for GPS derived water products and the other focused on the public I can pretty sure that I am making a greater impact via that second website Last Name Larson What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond While my group has made advances in using GPS receivers to characterize environmental conditions soil moisture snow depth vegetation water content sea level ash in plumes I honestly think this field is just in its infancy There are over ten thousand GPS receivers around the world which are currently tracking GPS signals there could easily be twice that number in five years viewing signals from multiple GNSS constellations The geodetic community has a great opportunity to engage in environmental research and to interact with these new geoscience communities significantly broadening the impact of our research particularly in water management and climate monitoring I think we are also likely to see GNSS routinely deployed at volcanos to detect ash laden plumes What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond UNAVCO runs a state of the art GNSS archiving facility with raw GNSS observations stored and made easily accessible Many other archives simply store RINEX files in many cases degrading their quality and neglect to archive signal strength data Most networks fail to track or do not archive new GNSS signals We need UNAVCO to be a leader in this area hopefully leading other archives and network operators to adopt more modern protocols Finally it would be extremely helpful if the UNAVCO community treated GNSS derived environmental data products like traditional products positions Environmental products are science products like any other they just don t tell you anything about faults and earthquakes That is not a bad thing We need to stop having science sessions called Other Applications of GNSS and putting everything that isn t related to faults earthquakes in it Select Whitepaper Category New Technologies Whitepaper Image Upload addoss concept jpg Authors Jonathan Berger Gabi Laske John Orcutt Jeff Babcock Image Caption Concept of Offshore GSN Station A wave glider hovers about a ocean floor seismic station Data is telemetered from ocean floor to ocean surface via acoustic link and then to shore via satellite link with the wave glider acting as the ocean surface gateway Keywords Earthquake monitoring seismic imaging ocean bottom seismology global seismic network Title Expansion of the Global Seismic Network into the Oceans Email jberger ucsd edu First Name Jonathan What facility capabilities are needed to support broader impact needs post 2018 education outreach training workforce development international For the next years and beyond 2018 a better integration of land and ocean going research is desirable Currently even amphibious seismic experiments such as the Cascadia Initiative are not fully integrated because of persistent issues with instrumentation disparity and meta data Many current studies therefore lack a truly amphibious seismic data analysis While some of the current hurdles could be overcome by standardized equipment the broader user community would benefit greatly from better awareness and training on how to deal with a diverse pool of seismic data Last Name Berger What key scientific questions emerging science opportunities and technical advances will you be pursuing in 2018 and beyond In 2004 the IRIS global seismic network GSN standing committee announced in an article in EOS that the GSN reached its design goal At the time the GSN reached the best global station coverage that can be attained by land based observatory installations This includes sometimes rather costly borehole installations on small ocean islands An original goal set by GSN included that no point on the globe be farther away from a seismic station that 1000 km While this goal was met for virtually all dry land vast areas in the oceans remain out of reach A multitude of consequences includes an increased detection threshold for earthquakes as well as a dramatic lack of seismic imaging fidelity in uncovered regions that affects all depth ranges from the crust to the inner core The situation remains particularly severe in the South Pacific ocean but parts on other oceans also still lack coverage The next big goal for GSN therefore needs to include its expansion to the ocean floor Broad band ocean bottom seismometer technology has made significant progress after advances in high density lithium battery technology as well as low power data acquisition systems Year long deployments are now standard in broadband OBS experiments and some OBS installations reach low noise levels seen on land stations at least on the vertical seismometer component What foundational or frontier geodetic and seismic facility capabilities will be required to support geoscience research in 2018 and beyond We assume that the GSN remains one the top three core facilities at IRIS As far as current OBS deployments go the main problem is that the data remain out of reach until the instruments are recovered a year later For some applications such as earthquake and tsunami monitoring this is not acceptable Sea cables or moorings that can provide continuous power and real time data access are prohibitively costly and the locations of existing sea cables may be incompatible with the expansion needs of the GSN Wave gliders can provide an un tethered real time data link through a pair of acoustic modems The wave glider link currently tested for the ADDOSS project Autonomously Deployable Deep Ocean Seismic System provides continuous 1 Hz data for 4 channels 3 seismometer channels plus pressure In addition data at a higher sampling rate can

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    your questions and enable you to interact with IRIS DMC staff To register for this event please visit the short course page at the DMC website Jumping on the Employment Express How to be Part of the Geosciences Employment Boom Organized By Christopher Keane Dir of Communications and Technology American Geosciences Institute Danielle Sumy Univ of Southern California Andy Frassetto IRIS Topics to be Covered building a skill based resume thinking of opportunities in the geosciences vs location with map exercise reviewing data about jobs in the earth sciences where graduates are finding employment location and type think pair share exercise amongst participants Q A with speakers from non academic career tracks Field Trip Newberry volcano is near the western end of the High Lava Plains HLP seismic experiment one of the largest deployments of broadband and controlled source Flexible Array instruments and has been the target of several USGS and NSF funded seismic and magnetotellurics studies Snow accumulation is less than usual this year so we hope to have access to the caldera which is less than 25 miles from the Workshop venue On Sunday afternoon we offer two alternatives for enjoyable and informative field trips Volcano Geology Bob Jensen will lead a field trip to geologically significant features related to Newberry Volcano Bob is a retired Forest Service employee and USGS volunteer who has worked closely with USGS volcano geologist Julie Donelly Nolan In addition to the caldera other possible destinations include Lava Butte and Pilot Butte each within 15 miles of Sunriver Resort Geothermal Energy Trenton Cladouhos of AltaRock Energy will lead a trip to the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal Systems site IRIS portable instrumentation was used for studies at this site where an enhanced geothermal systems demonstration at Newberry Volcano that is partially funded by the Department of Energy Seth Moran of the Cascadia Volcano Observatory will join this trip and there may be opportunities to view stations installed in recent years to improve monitoring of Newberry Volcano Special Interest Group Meetings Meetings expected to be of special interest to groups of 10 to 50 Workshop participants are scheduled during selected time intervals of 60 or 90 minutes through the Workshop Each SIG meeting is intended to function as a two way street That is the organizers typically make or invite a few short presentations partly to inform the group about recent developments but also to stimulate discussion about how activities can better serve the community SIG meetings are not scheduled while oral sessions or poster sessions are underway but several meetings run concurrently during each SIG interval The program committee aims to minimize conflicts by scheduling meetings on topics likely to have overlapping participation at different times One benefit from this is that the meeting topics during each interval are diverse and most participants are keenly interested in at least one meeting during each SIG interval This year organizers are being asked to provide reports back to the Board of Directors about an outcome from each meeting including what the community has suggested for research and education services to advance geoscience in the future You can help the meeting organizers represent your views in their reports by attending and actively participating in SIG meetings Enabling Large N Organized by John Hole Virginia Tech Bob Woodward IRIS Evolving technologies will allow the deployment of seismic arrays capable of recording well sampled wavefields reducing or eliminating aliasing The resulting datasets will enable new wavefield imaging methods that can transform studies of seismic sources and of Earth structure The largest potential for new science capacity is likely to be at low frequencies to intermediate periods which include societally relevant topics such as earthquake hazards source discrimination and energy At this meeting we will describe converging technologies for field acquisition and data analysis of full wavefields and discuss how we might move forward with creating a Large N facility to enable this vision Subduction Zone Observatory Organized by Jeff McGuire WHOI Bob Woodward IRIS With the successful completion of EarthScope it will be possible to jointly leverage the USArray and PBO efforts to create an unprecedented 18 000 km long Subduction Zone Observatory along the length of the east Pacific margin An SZO stretching from the Aleutians in the north to the tip of Tierra del Fuego in the south can enable research on all facets of subduction zone processes and facilitate a systems approach to a complex inter linked set of processes involving deformation on times scales from seconds to millions of years and spatial scales from millimeters to thousands of kilometers The SZO would provide unprecedented observations of deformational responses before during and after a megathrust earthquake and other phenomena on the plate interface including slow slip events and episodic tremor An SZO would improve our understanding of the dynamic processes in a variety of geophysical hazards including earthquakes tsunamis volcanic eruptions and landslides The observations would be relevant to grand challenges in Earth science including fluid flux through the crust and mantle geochemical processes in arcs and injection of water into the mantle The SZO would be multidisciplinary encompassing geodetic seismographic magnetotellurics LIDAR InSAR and other observing systems Our goals at this meeting are to begin identifying and compiling specific ideas and objectives for an SZO to identify other geoscience communities with interest in SZO science and to make progress towards an international workshop to articulate the major science objectives and required facilities Global Array of Broadband Arrays Organized by Keith Koper Univ of Utah Description coming soon USArray in Alaska Organized by Doug Christensen Univ of Alaska Katrin Hafner IRIS Frank Vernon Univ of California Beginning in 2014 and accelerating during 2015 and 2016 the Transportable Array will be deployed as a single footprint in Alaska and northwestern Canada These TA stations will be arranged in a grid like pattern spaced at 85 km covering all of interior Alaska and adjacent areas IRIS is working with the Alaska Earthquake Center Alaska Volcano Observatory and the Alaska Tsunami Warning Center to upgrade and leverage existing seismic infrastructure and permitting wherever possible Installation will be complete by late 2017 TA stations are operated at least two years until removed While no firm date has been set for removal its expected to begin in 2019 Flexible Array deployments are also expected in Alaska and at least one project is already funded to study the Cook Inlet Basin Other FlexArray deployments might be focused in the active arc for volcanic processes earthquake processes and active tectonic processes rapid mobilizations of instruments for post earthquake studies or other projects limited only by the imagination of the community IRIS management and governance have been working to scale the TA in Alaska Project to awarded budgets and forecasts as these total 15 less than proposed over five years We describe the need for changes and the approach used to rescope the deployment We want to discuss this with science community so they can appreciate the schedule and potential impacts and in particular to extend community discussion of science objectives including new objectives presented by the geophysical setting and possible impacts to rescoping choices Many of the scope adjustments are limited in the first year or so and so clarity on objectives will continue to guide further steering in the next year or so as the effects of changes accumulate in later years In general the deployment will shrink from 294 stations to about 262 stations with interspersed stations dropped from the grid in the Northern and Western periphery and in Canada and the effort on continuous real time telemetry and station construction costs will be scaled back 10 Current and Future States of PASSCAL Organized by Seth Moran USGS Bob Woodward IRIS Since its inception 25 plus years ago the IRIS PASSCAL program has evolved in ways large and small to meet the evolving needs of the PI community In this SIG meeting we will to briefly describe the different ways that PASSCAL provides service to investigators and provide updates on service levels to be provided under the SAGE budget We will also review the current state of health of the PASSCAL instrument pool including presenting findings from the PASSCAL Sustainability Working Group that has been looking into various questions regarding the sustainability of the instrument pool We encourage any and all potential users of the PASSCAL program to come learn about how PASSCAL works and discuss some of the challenges facing the program as we move into SAGE High Performance Computing Organized by Carl Tape Univ of Alaska Rengin Gok Lawrence Livermore National Lab The infrastructure available today for collecting exchanging and comparing multiple types of geophysical data is advancing rapidly sensors are becoming less expensive to acquire and more readily deployed in large numbers while the capacities for data telemetry and storage increase These developments create opportunities for cutting edge computational facilities to facilitate rapid advances in deep and broad understanding of many Earth processes with benefits extending to broader society The U S has committed to developing exascale computing and hardware with vastly greater capabilities have been created yet none of the systems are configured or managed with the requirements of Earth science research as a consideration Efficient use of a shared computing would require adoption of community data and software but the Earth science community is already pursuing this course even while very few joint teams of software engineers and discipline scientists are even aware of the distinct requirements of Earth science research We will describe efforts to improve this situation and seek community input on how they envision using advanced computing capability and features that would facilitate their use of such services Discussion will be based in part on the community white paper Advancing Solid Earth System Science through High Performance Computing Volume Velocity Inversions and Converted Wave Migrations Uncertainties Uniqueness Organized by Ken Dueker Univ of Wyoming Rick Aster Colorado State Univ Seismic and seismically derived inverse models of Earth structure are cornerstone contributions of seismology to Earth sciences However their use is subject to over interpretation and or misrepresentation particularly by non specialists At this meeting we plan to discuss ways in which we might more adequately and accurately portray and convey uncertainty and non uniqueness issues within the seismological community and with peer geoscientists from other areas of specialization We invite practitioners and users of seismic velocity models to participate broadly in this discussion Possible topics might include tools for more completely investigating resolution examination of regularization or other biasing methodologies dissemination of models normative expectations for peer reviewed manuscripts presenting and or utilizing velocity models and issues related to their interpretation in terms of mappings of temperature attenuation mineralogy phase etc IRIS Support for Early Career Scientists Organized by Tim Ahern IRIS John Taber IRIS Are you unsure about which tool is the best for you to access data and data products from the IRIS DMC Then come join this SIG which will focus on tools and services for early career scientists It will begin with a short summary of the various client applications and web services that scientists can use to easily access time series and products available from the IRIS DMC The majority of the SIG will be for interactions between early career scientists and IRIS staff to discuss research needs and potential data access and data product solutions Among the tools discussed will be WILBER3 IEB jWeed and several powerful PERL and shell scripts available from the IRIS DMC Additionally the interfaces to MatLab and ObsPy will be presented along with hints for accessing information directly using standard Internet tools such as wget and curl Increasing Seismometer Presence in the Oceans Identification of Scientific Needs Organized by Brent Evers IRIS The Ocean Bottom Seismograph Instrument Pool OBSIP is soliciting input from the seismology community to identify the key concerns and services that OBSIP should provide in the future OBSIP has recently expanded our instrument fleet and added pressure gauges to many of the existing instruments Recent community experiments provide an opportunity for OBSIP to expand the OBS user base and encourage use of OBS data This SIG will give an overview of recent changes in the OBSIP facility and focus on identifying the OBS community s needs for the future Real Time Seismic Data from the Oceans Organized by Gabi Laske Scripps Inst of Oceanography Frederik Simons Princeton Univ Guust Nolet Géoazur Two new developments in ocean seismology offer methods of extending the Global Seismic Network into the oceanic domain Wave gliders coupled acoustically to ocean bottom seismometers ADDOSS and the recording of seismic P waves by untethered low cost floats in the water column MERMAID We will start this meeting with summaries of what has been accomplished so far then discuss a number of important questions What are the design goals of an Ocean GSN What are the possibilities advantages and drawbacks of each system What synergies can be obtained with other disciplines beyond seismology Should the seismic community start a worldwide effort like the FDSN or leave it to individual PI s to launch such instruments What role can IRIS play in these initiatives IRIS Government Communications Organized by Ray Willemann IRIS Anne Meltzer Lehigh Univ Apart from its role as facility operator the IRIS Consortium of U S universities is an advocate for government policies and funding that support geoscience research emphasizing the use of seismological data to address a wide range of objectives with benefits to broader society IRIS works to inform members of Congress and administration officials about how seismology and related fields of geophysics contribute to tsunami early warning earthquake rapid alerts and early warning earthquake hazard mitigation underground nuclear test monitoring exploration and evaluation of energy and mineral resources mapping hydrologic and other near surface resources and documenting selected aspects of the state of the ocean and of glaciers At this meeting we will provide a summary of recent IRIS activities in this area and solicit community input on prioritizing future activities Undergraduate Curriculum Organized by Michael Hubenthal IRIS Derek Schutt Colorado State Univ John Taber IRIS Would you like to add some new seismology exercises into your intro classes Do you need some ideas and resources for upper level seismology courses Are you interested in getting involved in education research This meeting will begin with an overview of a recently developed and tested set of intro undergraduate activities that are based on the grand challenges in seismology The activities are designed to be integrated into your existing courses while also conveying the latest seismological research to your students This will be followed by a discussion on a developing project to provide a shared repository of higher level course materials PowerPoint files homework labs etc from individual faculty members Feedback is needed from the community as to how to organize and curate such a collection and to define what is most needed The meeting will conclude with a discussion of the spectrum of opportunities for the IRIS community to increase their involvement in geoscience education research Commonalities between Exploration and Academic Seismology Organized by Emily Brodsky Univ of California Bob Woodward IRIS Recent technical developments bring together seismologists from industry and academia in a variety of ways Autonomous seismic exploration acquisition equipment allows the economic collection of continuous passive seismic data that is not normally acquired in conjunction with controlled source seismic exploration This passive data records naturally occurring signals ambient noise micro earthquakes and teleseismic events that can provide additional understanding of the subsurface Recent advances in seismic data analysis can utilize these naturally occurring signals to complement and enhance subsurface images from active source seismic surveys These advances incorporate techniques that cross over between exploration and earthquake seismology and are being applied to 3D and 4D active source surveys We seek community involvement in emerging topics of common interest that include applications and algorithms instrumentation and sensors using dense arrays in both active and passive source applications multi use data sets managing large data sets and developing the workforce of the future Early Career Work Life Balance Organized by Harmony Colella Miami Univ Danielle Sumy Univ of Southern California Andy Frassetto IRIS New faculty members and researchers have commitments spread across research teaching service student advising family etc This SIG meeting will be split into two parts First we will be introduce the incoming Chair of the Working Group and discuss the current needs of the ECI community Second a panel of seasoned members of the community will profile their career paths and be available to answer questions from early career scientists We encourage all members of the IRIS community to attend and participate in this SIG Perspectives and mentorship from more senior members of the IRIS community are particularly welcomed For more ECI information please visit IRIS ECI Posters Workshop participants are encouraged to present posters on IRIS facilitated research and on topics related to the oral sessions In lieu of an abstract each poster presenter must submit a Science Highlight by April 30 Science Highlight titles and authors information will be printed in the Workshop program and the agenda includes times devoted exclusively to poster presentations View Science Highlights All posters will be displayed through the entire Workshop on 8 wide x 4 high poster boards in the event space where break refreshments will be served Posters on related topics will be clustered and scheduled for authors to be available for discussion at the same time Poster assignment information will be available at the Registration table beginning at 3 pm on Sunday June 8 You may begin to hang posters after 3 00pm on Sunday Posters need to be removed by 12 00 pm on Wednesday The Science Highlights will also be stored and prominently displayed from IRIS homepage presenting an opportunity to share with all the broad and exciting body of work produced by the IRIS community This virtual archive will serve as a resource to peers within the

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    related to the oral plenary sessions Posters will be displayed in the ballroom at the Convention Center which is large enough for all of the posters to remain up for the entire Workshop Break refreshments will be served in the ballroom and the agenda will include times devoted exclusively to poster presentations Posters on related topics will be clustered and scheduled for authors to be available for discussion at the same time To present a poster at the 2012 IRIS Workshop you must submit a Science Highlight by May 4 IRIS will use the Science Highlight title and author information for the poster information to be published in the Workshop program The Science Highlights will also be stored and prominentaly displayed from IRIS homepage presenting an opportunity to share with all the broad and exciting body of work produced by the IRIS community This virtual archive will serve as a resource to peers within the geoscience community science directors at the National Science Foundation and the general public We encourage members of the IRIS community to contribute scientific educational and outreach highlights to our gallery of IRIS enabled accomplishments Special Interest Group SIG Meetings Wednesday Next Generation Instrumentation for Portable Seismology Seth Moran James Gridley While the IRIS 2013 2018 proposal includes a commitment to sustaining the existing PASSCAL and USArray pools of broadband Texan and multichannel sensor digitizer packages the portable pool also has limitations in terms of the types of experiments it can support In this SIG we will discuss the science drivers for a new style of experiment involving tight spatial arrays of large numbers Large N of intermediate period 10 30s sensors Presentations will include summaries of discussions to date and preliminary results from an ongoing trade study followed by community discussion of objectives and requirements Resources for Undergraduate Teaching in Seismology Maggie Benoit Michael Hubenthal What are the latest curricular materials available to teach seismology at a variety of undergraduate levels What topics or resources e g software DMS tools data sets would you like to see developed into activities for your students This SIG will include an overview of some of the most recently developed activities designed to be integrated into your existing courses while also conveying the latest seismological research to your students This will be followed by a discussion focused on eliciting feedback regarding new curricular activities that will be developed through both IRIS and the Pearson Higher Ed group This is your chance to have an impact on the materials that will be available in the future GSN Data Quality Kent Anderson Tim Ahern The GSN network is two years into a major quality initiative to improve the state of the GSN dataset This work has included the continued upgrade to the GSN field systems and infrastructure calibration of the GSN seismometers review and update to the station metadata and the implementation of an updated Quality Assurance System to identify document rectify and report data issues to the network operators and the GSN data user community In conjunction with the GSN effort the DMS is revamping its data quality tools to improve and expand the metrics available to assess the quality of the overall IRIS data holdings This SIG will provide an update to both the GSN Quality Assurance System and the DMS Quality assessment tool development Thursday Global Array of BroadBand Arrays GABBA Chuck Ammon Thorne Lay Keith Koper Important research questions related to Earth s deep interior and complex earthquake faulting processes are difficult to resolve with present day configurations of global seismic networks However significant progress can be made using medium aperture 150 km x 150 km to 300 km x 300 km broadband arrays if the number of such arrays around the world with strategic locations can be increased with operational lifetimes of a decade or more This SIG will explore this concept for expansion of IRIS instrumentation supporting global seismology recognizing that strong international partnerships will be essential to achieving a system with on the order of 10 GABBA nodes around the world We invite short contributions on research applications that have utilized current broadband arrays and dense networks of stations from regional networks PASSCAL deployments etc of dimensions comparable to the GABBA notion as well as contributions on complementary value of deploying additional short period arrays around the world We also seek to identify a GABBA working group that can advance this concept and serve as a workshop steering committee that IRIS may support in the Fall of 2012 to explore development of a proposal to augment global seismic observations with GABBA Seismo Acoustics Brian Stump Michael Hedlin Stephen Arrowsmith With the addition of both barometers and infrasound gauges to the Transportable Array a rich source of atmospheric pressure data is now available in consort with seismic data These data are providing the ability to study sources of both seismic and acoustic energy such as shallow earthquakes ocean storms as well as man made sources such as explosions The data provide the opportunity to not only characterize these sources but also quantify the time varying nature of the atmosphere as well as constrain sources in the atmosphere that primarily generate pressure waves The stations provide data for the study of coupling across a very broad frequency band between the atmosphere and the solid Earth We will review the current opportunities that exist for combining seismic and pressure data for studying not only sources of these waves but also for characterizing the atmosphere as a function of time Early Career Investigators Danielle Sumy Harmony Colella Andy Frassetto New faculty members and researchers have commitments spread across research teaching service student advising family etc This SIG meeting will be split into two parts First a panel of seasoned members of the community will profile their career paths and be available to answer questions from early career scientists Second we will review the current resources available to assist early career development and discuss ideas for their improvement This SIG will serve as a formal beginning to the IRIS Early Career Investigator ECI Program a community where we can foster collaboration and openly and freely discuss ways to overcome common challenges We encourage all members of the IRIS community to attend and participate in this SIG Perspectives and mentorship from more senior members of the IRIS community are particularly welcomed For more ECI information please visit www iris edu hq eci Solid Earth Science Computational Facility Jeroen Tromp Alan Levander Artie Rodgers Louise Kellogg With dramatic increases in the quality and quantity of geophysical data and the availability of sophisticated open source numerical modeling tools there is a need for a Solid Earth Science high performance computing facility As examples USArray and similarly dense international arrays are providing seismologists with a tsunami of new data Data analysis is keeping up with data acquisition only for the computationally simplest analysis methods as even computationally modest analysis is often still labor intensive Imaging modeling with this data requires powerful numerical modeling tools automation of routine analysis tasks and high performance computing facilities without which the power of these arrays as observational platforms for deciphering North American structure may never be realized Such a facility was envisioned in the first IRIS proposal as long ago as 1984 Hardware structure machine access and scheduling policies in such a facility would reflect the research education and training needs of the solid Earth community thereby enabling rapid major advances in this vibrant area of research Friday Synergies in Seismology between GeoPRISMS and EarthScope Susan Schwartz Maggie Benoit Cliff Thurber The GeoPRISMS Program successor to MARGINS offers near term opportunities for interdisciplinary onshore offshore investigations at three US continental margins Alaska Aleutians Subduction Zone Cascadia Subduction Zone and Eastern North American and eventually also in East Africa and New Zealand Recent community planning workshops for the three US settings jointly sponsored by GeoPRISMS and EarthScope outlined the scientific targets and research priorities for each setting defining research opportunities in seismology and associated interdisciplinary studies We will review the community developed implementation plans for these three primary sites with emphasis on opportunities for the IRIS community and entertain open discussions about specific projects and collaborations designed to achieve the scientific objectives of the program Citizen Science in Seismology Elizabeth Cochran and Richard Allen The general public has been enlisted to help with seismology research and hazards mitigation in a variety of projects ranging from the well established such as Did You Feel It to developing monitoring programs such as the Quake Catcher Network to novel uses of social media Some projects ask for volunteers to host sensors while other go door to door with specific requests This SIG will include presentations from some of the groups that count on public involvement followed by discussion of lessons learned and strategies to engage the public in future projects International Development Seismology What Where and How Susan Beck Jay Pulliam Scientific engagement in developing parts of the world presents the university community with unique challenges and exciting opportunities to directly impact society in ways that complement their fundamental research activities In addition scientists conducting research in developing countries have the opportunity to become true global scholars sharing the excitement and intellectual resources of the scientific quest with local partners While these experiences can be quite rewarding sustaining their impetus often requires creative schemes particularly to harness the necessary financial resources Over the past few years IRIS IDS has begun the exploration of these issues and the most effective ways to address them We invite all members of the IRIS community at any career stage to share their experiences opinions and recommendations for how to make global social responsibility an integral part of our exciting international seismology Data Products Chad Trabant Tim Ahern A discussion of data products that are or could be produced by the IRIS DMC and used by the community to aid in research IRIS staff will give an overview of existing data products currently produced at the DMC The DMC s product effort is community driven this is an opportunity for direct feedback with a focus on future data products For a list of the currently data produced products including information on future products please visit http www iris edu dms products Pre Workshop Symposia Where individuals are prepared to make a greater effort to address an important need a half day or full day symposium just before and after the IRIS Workshop can be an opportunity to delve deeply into a particular area Suggestions for additional symposia that link facility activities with research or education projects are welcome but those planned at this time are DMS Short Course Web Services Educational Affiliates Meeting OBS IP Short Course for First Time Users Travel Lodging Registration is Now Closed Meeting Venue Hotel Booking Information Airport Ground Transportation Information Travel and Lodging Reimbursement Policies Members of the Board of Directors and Program Committees Speakers at Plenary Sessions Representatives of IRIS Voting Member Institutions Students and Postdoctoral Fellows Policies Applicable to All Participants Meeting Venue Plenary sessions poster sessions special interest group meetings SIGs and pre Workshop symposia will all be held in the Boise Centre on The Grove located in downtown Boise The Workshop consists of three full days beginning on Wednesday June 13 and ending with an afternoon field trip and off site dinner on Friday June 15 Pre Workshop symposia will be held on Tuesday June 12 http boisecentre com Lodging Reservation Deadline is Monday May 21 One Block from Boise Centre on The Grove The Grove Hotel 245 S Capitol Blvd Boise Idaho 83702 http www grovehotelboise com Standard Group Rate 112 night Online Reservations Group Code IRISC Phone Reservations 888 961 5000 Reference IRIS Corporate Rate Government Group Rate 77 night Online Reservations Group Code IRISG Phone Reservations 888 961 5000 Reference IRIS Government Rate Three Blocks from Boise Centre on The Grove Hampton Inn Suites 495 S Capitol Blvd Boise Idaho 83702 http hamptoninn hilton com en hp groups personalized B BOIDNHX IRS 20120611 index jhtml WT mc id POG Group Rate 114 night Phone Reservations 208 331 1900 Group Code IRIS Airport Ground Transportation Information Boise Airport BOI is 4 miles from both hotels and the Boise Centre The airport services five airlines Alaska Airlines Delta Airlines Southwest Airlines United Airlines USAir More Information can be obtained here http www iflyboise com Shuttle Service Complimentary Both hotels offer complimentary shuttle service Look for the hotel board near the baggage claim area Search for your hotel push the hotel button and a shuttle will be called for pick up Please check in with your hotel concierge to secure shuttle service for your return trip to the airport Taxi fare 15 Travel and Lodging Reimbursement Policies Our biennial Workshop is a unique opportunity for the IRIS community to convene for inclusive discussion of recent research facilities NSF priorities and plans IRIS helps to defray expenses in order to ensure broad participation in this conversation REGISTRATION FEES ARE A NON REIMBURSABLE EXPENSE FOR ALL CATEGORIES Members of the Board of Directors and Program Committees IRIS will reimburse members of the IRIS Board of Directors and voting members of the four Program Standing Committees for the cost of their own lodging during the Workshop and their own travel up to a maximum of 500 Speakers at Plenary Sessions IRIS will reimburse speakers at Plenary Sessions for the cost of their own lodging during the Workshop and their own travel up to a maximum of 500 Organizing a plenary session or organizing or speaking at a SIG meeting does not qualify a participant for reimbursement of any expenses Representatives of IRIS Voting Member Institutions For each Voting Member of the Consortium that is not represented at the Workshop by a member of the Board of Directors a member of one of the four Program Standing Committees or a speaker at a Plenary Session IRIS will reimburse one representative for the cost of their own lodging during the Workshop Voting Member Representatives are responsible for the cost of their own travel Voting Members of the Consortium are encouraged to use this support for a junior faculty member who might not otherwise be able to participate in the Workshop Students and Postdoctoral Fellows Subject to individual approval in advance of the workshop IRIS will pay the cost of lodging in a shared double room during the Workshop and reimburse the cost of their travel up to a maximum of 500 for a limited number of students and post docs Normally no more than one person is supported in this category from each Voting Member of the Consortium IRIS will reserve rooms and assign roommates for approved students and post docs Supported students and post docs who choose not to share a room may contact IRIS to make arrangements for a single room at the individual s expense in excess of the shared room rate Policies Applicable to All Participants Every participant is responsible to register for the Workshop and field trips before the deadline and must pay the Workshop and field trip fees Every participant is individually responsible for expenses except where reimbursement is explicitly offered above Every participant is responsible for travel expenses in excess of 500 expenses for travel in first or business class or on non U S carriers lodging for accompanying persons and lodging before or after the Workshop Except for supported students and post docs every participant is responsible for making their own lodging reservation Every registered participant and registered accompanying person is welcome at all group meals breakfast lunch dinner and breaks throughout the Workshop Qualified participants will receive reimbursement after submitting an IRIS expense form and receipts within one month after the Workshop Contact If you have any questions or comments regarding the science program please contact a member of the Science Program Committee Susan Bilek New Mexico Tech Socorro NM sbilek nmt edu John Hole Virginia Tech Blacksburg VA hole vt edu Lee Liberty Boise State University Boise ID lliberty boisestate edu If you have any questions or comments regarding the meeting please contact Mary Baranowski 1200 New York Avenue NW Suite 400 Washington DC 20005 Mary Baranowski iris edu Phone 202 682 2220 Ext 116 Fax 202 682 0633 Presentations from the plenary sessions are posted next to the title of talk and can be downloaded as a pdf document View the updated participant list here WEDNESDAY June 13 7 30am Breakfast Registration 8 30am Welcomes 9 00am Planary Session Recent Science Drivers and Enablers Rick Aster Don Forsyth Mike Ritzwoller Once upon a Time in USArray Download Brandon Schmandt Community Driven Data Collection and an Evolving View of Lithospheric Structure and Dynamics Download Mike Brudzinski New Insight into Episodic Tremor and Slip from Improved recording Networks Download Mark Benthien Shakeouts Scenarios And Advances in Public Awareness and Planning Download 11 00am Coffee break 11 30am Special Interest Group Meetings concurrent Next Generation Instrumentaion for Portable Seismology Seth Moran James Gridley Resources for Undergraduate teaching in Seismology Maggie Benoit Michael Hubenthal GSN Data Quality Kent Anderson Tim Ahern 1 00pm Lunch 2 00pm Poster Sessions 3 30pm Coffee Break 4 00pm Discussion Session The IRIS Proposal for 2013 2018 Brian Stump David Simpson Matt Fouch John Hole 5 30pm Cash Bar 6 00pm Group Dinner THURSDAY June 14 7 30am Breakfast Registration 8 30am Plenary Session Imagine Anticipated Science to Meet New Challenges John Vidale Anne Sheehan Kelin Wang Seismology Beyond Seismic Waves The Way Forward in the Study of Subduction Earthquakes Download Meredith Nettles Seismic Studies of the Cryosphere Atmosphere and Oceans Download Matt Haney The Detection of Small Time Varying Crustal Properties Diving into the Seismic Dumpster for Treasure Download Greg Beroza Faulting from First Principles Download 10 30am Coffee Break 11 00am Special Interest Group Meetings concurrent Global Array of BroadBand Arrays GABBA Chuck Ammon Thorne Lay Keith Koper Seismo Acoustics Brian Stump Michael Hedlin Stephen Arrowsmith Early

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