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  • Indiana University mourns David Baker, distinguished professor and jazz legend: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    built our jazz program from the ground up and through it influenced generations of artist teachers David Baker was the B in the ABC of international jazz education Aebersold Jamey Baker and Coker Jerry Beloved by colleagues students and the public he brought people to his art and once there moved and inspired them though his composition performance and teaching He is was and always will be a towering figure in our field It is almost impossible to comprehend the scope of David s work and impact as a performer teacher composer band leader and arts advocate said Tom Walsh chair of the Jacobs Jazz Studies Department Over the last 50 years David Baker inspired thousands of music students educators and musicians His influence permeates the teaching of jazz music around the globe David was a brilliant person who was a joy to be around His humor his care for people and his great desire to share his knowledge and experience made him a magnet The encouragement he gave his students gave them the feeling that they could go into the world and do great things And they did David Nathaniel Baker Jr was born Dec 21 1931 in Indianapolis He graduated from Crispus Attucks High School in Indianapolis before attending Indiana University earning a Bachelor of Music Education degree in 1953 and a Master of Music Education degree in 1954 He studied with a wide range of master teachers performers and composers including Thomas Beversdorf Bobby Brookmeyer Bernhard Heiden J J Johnson George Russell William Russo Gunther Schuller and Janos Starker Originally a gifted trombonist he switched to the cello after sustaining jaw injuries in a car accident He began his teaching career at Missouri s Lincoln University in 1955 Baker was a regular on the thriving Indianapolis jazz scene of the era especially on its historic Indiana Avenue with the likes of fellow jazz giants Jimmy Coe Slide Hampton Freddie Hubbard J J Johnson Wes Montgomery Larry Ridley and David Young They are all included in the Jazz Masters of Indiana Avenue mural on Capitol Avenue in Indianapolis He was a member of the Quincy Jones Big Band during its 1960 European tour beginning a lifelong friendship with the music icon Top in his field in several disciplines Baker taught and performed throughout the United States Canada Europe Scandinavia Australia New Zealand and Japan He co founded the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and served as its conductor and musical and artistic director from 1990 to 2012 becoming maestro emeritus on Dec 1 2012 A 1973 Pulitzer Prize nominee Baker was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1979 and honored three times by DownBeat magazine as a trombonist for lifetime achievement and as the third inductee into its Jazz Education Hall of Fame He received numerous awards including the National Association of Jazz Educators Hall of Fame Award 1981 IU President s Award for Distinguished Teaching 1986 Arts Midwest Jazz Masters Award 1990 Governor s Arts Award of the

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/david_baker.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • Intersectionality: IU Latina Film Festival and Conference: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    Z Academic Support and Student Services News Fall 2015 Summer2015 Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Summer 2014 Spring 2014 2013 Diversity Assessment Support Diversity Support a Key Project or Multicultural Initiative Major Gifts and Bequests Create an Endowment Why Support OVPDEMA Contact Us OVPDEMA News Current DEMA News Intersectionality IU Latina Film Festival and Conference News Intersectionality IU Latina Film Festival and Conference By Latino Studies IUB Tuesday March 29 2016 The third Latino Film Festival and Conference will put Latina filmmakers actresses and Latina film scholars at the center The aim of this festival and conference is to present new perspectives in the studies of Latina identity that move us away from stereotypical representations and that showcases the intersectionality of identity within the contexts of immigration gender sexuality social class and race ethnicity issues The Latina Film Festival provides an exciting and productive paradigm in which to showcase the innovative directing and acting of women in documentaries shorts and feature length films Multiple scholars and filmmakers will be present Festival and conference sponsors include the Latino Studies Program College of Arts and Sciences Ostrom Grants Program College Arts Humanities Institute Office of the Vice President for Diversity Equity and Multicultural

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/latina_film_festival.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • Chew on This: Sustainable Food with Cultural Flavors: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    the theme of Sustainability in an Unequal World One of the keynote speakers Tufts professor Julian Agyeman explained that for food to be sustainable fresh healthy locally grown without toxic chemicals and with fair labor practices it must also account for cultural differences According to this view sustainable food and food justice require growing items that appeal to the tastes of various community members and their unique cultural experiences In my case as someone of Puerto Rican descent I grew up consuming regular amounts of white rice and beans with plenty of cilantro and oregano for flavoring How about you Exemplifying a culturally oriented sustainable food effort in action on our campus La CASA IU s Latinx Cultural Center is planning a garden with support from the Bloomington Community Orchard at IU BCO IU This collaborative initiative is the only one of its kind and given interest from other cultural groups and communities BCO IU members are hopeful that La CASA is just the first of many such collaborations La CASA director Lillian Casillas has been an integral part of this effort and encourages students to have a direct role in the garden from planting to harvesting to cooking During one of our planning meetings we agreed to plant the following items this spring tomatoes hot peppers sweet potatoes corn squash cucumbers beans sunflowers lavender mint cilantro and parsley as well as some fig plum apple and magnolia trees La CASA members ability to locally grow and enjoy culturally significant fruits vegetables and herbs advances the just sustainable food approach advocated by Professor Agyeman So should you find yourself walking down Fourth Street with some friends in the near future ready to sample some international fare the ingredients and dishes you might encounter needn t be the opposite of sustainable

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/lacasa_garden.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • First 'Peyback Foundation' scholarship winner has flourished with award from Manning: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    summer said Washington He sent me a postcard with his appreciation for me trail blazing the scholarship and really honoring what it stood for I stay in contact with his foundation I write them every semester just to update them on what I m doing I ve done that every semester since I won the scholarship Washington won the scholarship as a three sport athlete senior class president and salutatorian at Indianapolis Arlington High School Washington still remembers the day he went to the Colts complex to meet Manning and receive the award Just a very genuine Southern guy said Washington I felt the warmth of his character and personality just with the few minutes we talked It seemed like I knew him longer than I did The scholarship paid 10 000 dollars a year toward Washington s bachelor s degree in public health which Washington earned from IU in 2014 Washington has studied abroad in Ghana and England This summer he will work on his masters project in China He will complete his master s degree in African American studies and then plans to enter law school next year I think one of the most important things I can take away from winning this scholarship was the ability and the concept to know I can do all things if I truly believe in it said Washington It s a long term beneficial component that I ve gained from it because now I don t have to worry about loans refinancing and all these different things that come with being a college student So that scholarship definitely helped me in all those areas It just shows the type of humanitarian efforts he puts out into the community An upstanding human being and he means the world to me and the

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/brandon_washington_peyback_scholarship.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • Meet Lekeah Durden, NSF Research Fellow and IU Ph.D. student in biology: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    IU Distinguished Professor of Biology investigates host microbe interactions in a fungus found in plants What first interested you in pursuing a career in biology I was always an inquisitive young kid I loved being outside and observing the world around me I think a fascination for the natural world got my attention and never let go Why did you choose IU to pursue your Ph D degree I chose to pursue my Ph D at IU because the Evolution Ecology and Behavior Graduate Program was highly rated and had several professors studying host microbial interactions and performing research that I found interesting The Department of Biology has so many great scientific minds that I get to interact with on a daily basis I find it really easy to get engaged with the research going on here What is your research interest My research interest revolves around host microbe interactions I mainly ask questions about the spectrum of mutualisms and pathogens and how their dynamics impact disease spread for their co evolved host What do you enjoy most about this subject Besides the real world application of understanding disease spread throughout populations I really enjoy investigating how some microbes can be beneficial yet variation in environmental conditions or hosts can lead it to act as a pathogen What does your lab work involve at IU and whose lab are you working in I am a member of the lab of Keith Clay IU Distinguished Professor of Biology One major project in the Clay lab pertains to fungal symbionts that live within a plant host These close associations are formed for many reasons one of my projects focuses on varieties of morning glories that have an endophytic fungi that produces toxic alkaloids I am investigating the maintenance of the co evolved

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/lekeah_durden_nsf.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • IU linguists provide Arikara and Pawnee dialogue for Oscar-nominated film 'The Revenant': Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    survive as he embarks on a quest to exact revenge on those who betrayed and abandoned him Unlike earlier films of this genre Parks said The Revenant is distinguished by its devotion to authenticity He praised the film s director Alejandro G Iñárritu saying he went to great lengths to recreate not only the vast wilderness and culture of fur trappers on the Northern Plains but also the authentic culture and languages of its indigenous Arikara and Pawnee peoples It was this devotion to authenticity that compelled Iñárritu and his studio to call upon Parks and Sutton to assist in the post production of Arikara and Pawnee dialogue for the film Parks a professor of anthropology and co director of the American Indian Studies Research Institute began his linguistic field studies of Pawnee as a graduate student at the University of California Berkeley in 1965 At that time there were 200 speakers of the language He continued work with native speakers until 2001 when the last one passed away In 1970 he undertook a long term study of Arikara with elderly speakers continuing his work with them until the last fluent speaker passed away also in 2001 Sutton began his study of Arikara in 2005 while working on a master s degree in linguistics at IU joining an Arikara language class offered by Parks for two native Arikara graduate students Sutton then began a collaboration on the Pawnee and Arikara languages with Parks as he completed his doctoral degree in linguistics at the University of New Mexico and the two have continued to collaborate to this day Alongside Parks he is one of only two specialists in the Arikara and Pawnee languages in the world Historically spoken in what is now Nebraska and the Dakotas Pawnee and Arikara are members of the Caddoan language family and thus are quite different from English and European languages Moreover there are no longer any fluent native speakers of either language So neither Parks nor Sutton were surprised to receive a call last fall from the movie studio looking for help in translating dialogue into these languages and coaching actors to speak their lines as accurately as possible Parks said Iñárritu wanted authentic Arikara and Pawnee speech to be used by the actors not some form of broken English For Parks the request was different enough from his usual academic pursuits to pique his interest I was just curious as the devil he said I had no idea how movies are created and what people who make them are like Everyone I met was very interesting Plus to my knowledge this is the first time Pawnee and Arikara have been depicted positively in a movie so it was an honor to be part of that New Regency Productions in Los Angeles Calif contacted Parks and asked him to translate the actors dialogue into Arikara and Pawnee Parks also was asked to come to the studio and assess exactly what needed to be done Subsequently

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/linguists_revenant.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • 100-year-old published poem reveals spirit, skill of pioneering IU student Carrie Parker: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    Parker attitude A poem written by Carrie Parker Taylor was printed on the first page of The Tulsa Star on Oct 8 1915 Carrie was born Dec 9 1878 in Enfield N C to parents who had endured slavery A brilliant student Carrie was the first black female to earn a high school diploma in Vermillion County Ind To do so she persevered through three years in the eighth grade The local tradition had been to stop black students from reaching high school by failing them and waiting for them to drop out Carrie would not bend so the school finally did At the time of that triumph many white townspeople showered her with flowers Carrie Parker became the top student in her graduating class In 1898 she enrolled at IU Carrie took classes for a year and said she was not made to feel my color much In exchange for a place to live however she had to cook and clean in a professor s home and almost killed myself trying to work my way through Even for Carrie who had overcome so many obstacles it was too much She married John G Taylor and while she planned to return to IU it was not to be Carrie Parker Taylor lived in Chicago and later in Michigan She instilled in her six children the importance of education She owned a house and helped found two churches She loved to sing She sold eggs and pies to neighbors She fed her family from a bountiful garden and taught them how to forage wild greens And throughout her life she continued to write God gave me the gift of speech she once said Carrie s poem It seems fitting to share Carrie s poem in the month of IU Bloomington s celebration Black History It s Not Just Our History It s American History The poem was published on the front page of The Tulsa Star an outspoken but short lived African American newspaper in Oklahoma In this transcription several missing vowels have been restored The Negro s Challenge By Carrie Parker Taylor You complain my brother my lily white brother Of our poor race now and then Yet you never have said what we should do To prove to you that we re men We ve done everything so far that you ve done Except sit in the president s chair And the only reason we haven t done that Is because you won t let us sit there In every walk of life that you ve been There s at least one of us there And you cannot deny but that we do Our work just as good and as fair Among the more common crafts of men Such as carpenters masons and painters We have quite a number and plasterers too And many stock raisers and planters We have lawyers and doctors and bankers a few And teachers we have by the score Undertakers and merchants and manufacturers

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/Carrie%20Parker.shtml (2016-04-30)
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  • Unexpected find in Mathers archives brings man's academic pursuits back to own Tuscarora Indian identity: Current DEMA News: News: Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs: Indiana University
    of native people and stumbled upon six photos from Joseph K Dixon s early 1900s visit to the Tuscarora nation the smallest of the Iroquois communities The Wanamaker collection includes nearly 8 000 photos taken of Native Americans between 1908 and 1923 While combing the archives Stahlman recognized the Tuscarora names his family members and his ancestors After Stahlman s discovery the Mathers gave Stahlman digital copies of the six photos to share with his family Inspired by an ethnographic study using photographs his wife worked on in South Africa Stahlman then took those photos back to the Tuscarora nation and began photographing members of the community holding or interacting with the archive photos of their ancestors Those photographs are now featured alongside the Wanamaker photos of the Tuscarora in the Mathers exhibit Stirring the Pot Bringing the Wanamakers Home The exhibit is on display through May 27 One of the reasons I love anthropology is because I like the research process and finding new things in the archives Stahlman said This exhibit grew out of that Without intending to embark on a photographic ethnography Stahlman and his wife Fileve also an anthropologist found themselves immersed on a mission of reconfiguring genealogies including Joe s own Although the Tuscarora Indians do not allow census data to be gathered it is estimated that the community has 1 000 to 1 200 people Because of the small size many living Tuscarora members are a descendant of at least one of the chiefs or the clan mother featured in the six original photos Over three years of trips to Stahlman s family and the Tuscarora Nation in western New York visiting three to four times each year the couple took photos of the modern Tuscarora community holding or interacting with one or more of the Wanamaker photographs The couple s photos simultaneously celebrate modernity and honor Tuscarora heritage They also show a different perspective of the Wanamaker photos which were most likely taken as a visual spectacle to share with the majority of Americans who had never seen an Indian before according to Brian Gilley professor of anthropology and director of the First Nations Educational and Cultural Center Stahlman s project using the Wanamaker collection turns the original intent on its head and creates new possibilities for indigenous sovereignty concerning how they are represented and how knowledge is produced about them Gilley said This project reconfigures the visual aspect of the settler colonial project toward indigenous control of representation In addition to learning more about Stahlman s own heritage the couple also used the photographs to shed light on a few of the misconceptions about native people including their dress and the Tuscarora relationship with modernity When people think about Indians they think of feathers leather and the head dress Joe Stahlman said pointing to the modern dress of his family and the Victorian dress of his ancestors in the Wanamaker photos With these images we are able to show how modern these

    Original URL path: http://www.iu.edu/%7edema/news/items/mathers_archives.shtml (2016-04-30)
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