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  • Gary's Earth Processes Classroom
    of a contrasting color on top of the crust surface material This allows for better observation of the ejecta resulting from the crater forming impact and is a great improvement Try using a fine brown powder such as chocolate milk mix powder hot chocolate mix powder or perhaps a chocolate cake mix Sprinkler a thin layer of the powder on top of the sand or other material you are using

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/alert/alert.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Program Preview
    Geometry 5 6 Geometry 6 8 History Social Science Overview Natural Events 4 6 California Here I Come 4 6 Student as an Historian 4 7 Student as a Media Evaluator 4 7 Chemistry 4 6 Earth Processes 4 6

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/banners/earth.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Soil Sampling Project
    can still join the project and share your data You will need materials similar to those described below local soil from your area clear jars with lids empty baby food jars or jelly jars work well magnifying lenses a trowel or shovel for digging soil pencils pens and blackline master for recording observations Procedure Dig up some soil from your local area Observe the soil with a hand lens and describe it in as much detail as you can Keep asking yourself what else you can observe that perhaps no one else has noticed Add enough soil to the container to cover the bottom about 5 10 cm deep depending on how large the container is you don t need too much soil Add water to the container until it is 3 4 full and attach the lid securely Shake the container to soil and water vigorously until the water and soil are well mixed Set the container aside and observe as the components of the soil settle to the bottom in turn Record your observations in a lab notebook or journal Allow the soil to settle for several days undisturbed and record your observations What type of material makes up the majority of the sample Is there evidence of organic material in the sample Does the soil contain mostly sand or silt and clay If you have completed the TEAMS Science activity Settling Soil compare your observations with the samples of clay potting soil and clay soil from the kit Share your observations with other schools by recording your observations below Keep thinking about the soil in your area Here are some questions to get you started Be sure to share ideas and questions with other schools in the discussion group area of this electronic classroom Keep in touch

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/projects/soil/soil.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Topographical Maps
    the right Which landform would have been formed by the erosion pattern shown on the topographical maps Click on the landform that you feel is the correct answer and find out if you are right If you are able to identify all three landforms correctly your name can be entered in Gary s List of Landform Experts Teacher Background Information Topographic maps represent three dimensional space in two dimensions Contour

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/activities/map/map.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Paper Volcanoes
    Scissors Procedure Download the volcano pattern and duplicate it onto cardstock or heavy paper Discuss and color the features represented on the model Cut and fold the model as indicated on the pattern Help the students to relate the internal structures represented by the model with the exterior shape and features of the volcano Teacher Background Information The paper model represents a stratovolcano or composite volcano It is the most common type of volcano on Earth Scientists classify volcanoes into three main types cinder cones shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes composite volcanoes Cinder cones are the smallest and are formed largely by the piling up of ash cinders and rocks all of which are called pyroclastic fire broken material that have been explosively erupted from the vent of the volcano As the material falls back to the ground it generally piles up to form a symmetrical steep sided cone around the vent Sunset Crater in Arizona and Paricutin in Mexico are well known examples of cinder cones Shield volcanoes are generally not explosive and are built by the accumulation of very fluid lava flows that spread out to produce a mountain with broad gentle slopes Shield volcanoes are the largest of

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/activities/volcano/paper.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Earth Processes Links
    of the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park Return to the top Earthquakes ABAG Earthquake Maps and Information Earthquake information and maps from the San Francisco Bay area Graphical Earthquake Maps Click on the region within the map of interest to you Seismic Source Modeling Seismic source modeling is taken to mean the modeling of seismograms to investigate kinematic properties of the earthquake source Seismological Laboratory The Caltech Seismological Laboratory monitors and provides information on seismic activity in Southern California Southern California Earthquake Data Center Find out about recent earthquakes see maps of fault lines and explore historical information about earthquakes in southern California U C Berkely s Seismological Laboratory A large collection of information and links on California earthquakes USGS Earthquake Information The latest quake information studying earthquakes hazards preparedness and more The World Wide Earthquake Locator An earthquake analysis system using data dynamically obtained over the internet Return to the top Mars Grand Canyon Astronomy for Kids Mars Description and photo The Grand Canyon of Mars and How it Formed Download the teacher guide for these 5 activities which explore the Grand Canyon of Mars Return to the top Pacific Ring of Fire Volcano locations Ring of Fire Maps and activity along the Ring of Fire Savage Earth The Ring of Fire info by Kathy Svitil from PBS online Volcanoes The Ring of Fire ThinkQuest project explaining facts about the Ring of Fire Return to the top Pacific Ring of Fire Earthquake Epicenters Amazingly Awesome Ring of Fire Learn about divergent transform and convergent plates or subduction zones making up the Ring of Fire Location of Plate Boundaries Earthquakes and volcanoes evidence of unrest in the Earth help locate the edges of plates Earthquakes are distributed in narrow linear belts that circle the Earth Map of Earthquake Epicenters Precisely as expected from theory volcanoes and earthquakes are concentrated along mid ocean ridges and trenches the Pacific Ring of Fire where crust is created and destroyed Return to the top Dynamic Earth Plate Tectonics The Dynamic Earth This site provides links to different research and teaching activities within the Department of Earth Sciences at Monash University which relate to how and why the Earth is moving The links are ordered in terms of scale from the largest phenomenon plate motion down to the smallest dislocation glide Geology Plate Tectonics This site explains the theories behind the history of the Earth with animated gifs to demonstrate them Plate Tectonics the Cause of Earthquakes A well illustrated discourse of what happens in plate tectonics to cause earthquakes Plate Tectonics Lesson A description of physical and chemical changes of the Earth historical development of plate tectonics and desciptions and locations of plate boundaries Return to the top The Rock Cycle The Rock Cycle A clickable picture of the rock cycle from the University of British Columbia The Rock Cycle Earth Floor presents this illustrated explanation of the rock cycle which never stops The Rock Cycle Experiments Ten experiments centering around the rock

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/web/earth.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Gary's Teacher's Corner
    school Acceptable Use Policies Every student parent and teacher should sign an Acceptable Use Policy before allowing students access to the Internet The Guide to Math and Science Reform A database of more than 1 100 entries that describe projects and organizations dedicated to significantly improving mathematics and science education in elementary and secondary schools from the Annenberg CPB Math and Science collection National Science Education Standards Access the National

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/earth/teacher/teacher.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Chemistry Kit Information
    50 100 200 1 6 1 2 6 50 1 lb box 1 lb box 1 lb box 1 lb box 26 oz box 2 lb box 150 grams 2 lbs 500 grams 1 2 grams 100 ml 100 ml 1 gram pkg of 8 pkg of 100 each 1 oz 1 oz 1 oz each box each each 25 mil 400 mil 8 oz 1 oz each 10 oz each each each each each box each each each box of 100 each each pkg of 8 colors each each Baking Soda Cornstarch Sugar granulated Sugar powdered Salt non iodized Plaster of paris Iron filings Sand fine brown Calcium chloride Phenol red Bromothymol blue Lugol s iodine Dichloroindophenol w measuring spoon Steel wool fine pH paper 0 14 Hot Hands hand warmer Food coloring blue Food coloring red Food coloring green Candles food warmer Matches wooden Well trays Scoops Graduated cylinders Beakers Squeeze bottles Dropper bottles Vials 13 dram Cups wide Medicine cups Droppers Funnels Trays notched Rubber bands Toothpicks flat Stirring sticks Beads plastic Filter paper strips 1 x 4 Filter paper med speed Magnet rubberized Marking pen black Crayons Ziplock bags 4 x 4 Ziplock bags 6 x

    Original URL path: http://teams.lacoe.edu/documentation/classrooms/gary/chemistry/program/kit.html (2016-02-17)
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