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  • Honoring excellence - MIT Sloan School of Management
    Sloan Directory Newsroom Newsroom Home Articles Archives Press Releases Media Highlights Expertise Guide Publications RSS Feeds Honoring excellence Published October 17 2014 Nine MBA students recognized for academic achievement and leadership The recipients of several annual awards given out to MBA students each year the Siebel Scholars the McKinsey Awards and the McGowan Award were announced Oct 15 at the first MBA lunch of the semester Senior Associate Dean Jake Cohen and MBA program director Maura Herson presented the awards Ido Segev MBA 07 associate principal in the Boston office at McKinsey Company announces recipients of the McKinsey Awards McKinsey Award winners are chosen based on community leadership and academic accomplishment Segev praised the MBA Class of 2016 It s outstanding to see the amount of leadership the drive and academic excellence that this class and this school possess it s challenging because at the end of the day we can only pick a few for the award Recipients of the McKinsey Award Andrew McClure Anesha Agarwal and Upekha Weerasinghe all MBA 16 along with alumnus Ido Segev from McKinsey Company Siebel Scholars Kevin Geehr Sam Clark Zach Freeman Alexandra Wright Christine Leach all MBA 15 with Senior Associate Dean

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-mba-awards.php (2015-03-14)
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  • A new look – and lights – for historic MIT Sloan building - MIT Sloan School of Management
    be lit up with a sculpture created by artist Leo Villareal Villareal was recently awarded an MIT Percent for Art commission to create a light installation for the historic building Building E52 known in the MIT tradition of numbering its buildings has been undergoing major renovations for the past year and is expected to re open in January 2016 said Cindy Hill MIT Sloan s director of capital projects Villareal last year created The Bay Lights on the San Francisco Bay Bridge West Span For E52 he plans to craft a light sculpture in the north vestibule which will feature a new glass enclosed entrance The proposed work will feature 240 hanging LED rods arranged from the ceiling in rows Each of these rods will measure approximately 9 feet tall and will consist of 72 individual LEDs Villareal will create a software code so that the LEDs will cycle through a randomly generated series of combinations The original MIT Sloan building built in 1938 as the site of the Lever Brothers company headquarters will not only feature the light sculpture but will be radically updated on the inside Hill said We are renovating a historic building and it was art déco in its original form Hill said I think we ll have some of that look going on when it s done She said the building s exterior will be preserved albeit repaired cleaned and with the addition of new windows Although there will be interior style changes the two main staircases and the elevators will remain in the original locations but the walls floors and ceilings will be new Building E62 featuring the Joan and William A Porter Center for Management Education already has a second story bridge which will connect to E52 once construction is done It will

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-e52-construction.php (2015-03-14)
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  • Chinese execs look to Boston, MIT as entrepreneurial ecosystem model - MIT Sloan School of Management
    10 The course examined the rise of innovation driven enterprises and asked the attendees to consider how similar ecosystems might be developed in China Attendees included a fashion designer a commercial real estate developer and the CEO of a solar energy company among others Associate Dean for Innovation Fiona Murray led the program which featured instruction from Senior Lecturer Philip Budden and Professor of Organization Studies Roberto Fernandez This was the second annual visit to Cambridge organized by the club The program was capped with a conversation led by Budden of how different cities and regions in the U S have developed entrepreneurial ecosystems Participants discussed the importance of stakeholder interaction between entrepreneurs venture capitalists governments corporations and schools and how that might be replicated in parts of China It s not unattainable Budden said But you have to understand the special strength of your ecosystem that gives you a unique role Murray said a highlight of the course was a tour of the Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship where study tour members met with students and alumni leading companies including Embr Labs the makers of Wristify a bracelet that serves as a personal heating and cooling device and Cardinal Wind which developed a quantitative analysis tool for investment in wind energy projects The idea Murray said was for the visitors to examine the Boston scene and develop an innovation ecosystem strategy to bring back to China Pujun Tian the CEO of Cloud in the Ninth Sky film production company said the visit took place as executives at her company whose American Dreams in China helped to drive growth in the Chinese box office last year consider developing a web based series with production values on par with that of Netflix s House of Cards Tian is looking to

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-china-entrepreneur-club.php (2015-03-14)
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  • An inside look at Europe's financial woes - MIT Sloan School of Management
    economic numbers still reflect widespread unemployment and slow to nonexistent growth In an Oct 9 talk at MIT Sloan Ewald Nowotny governor of the National Bank of Austria and a member of the governing council of the European Central Bank shared the latest on the eurozone monetary picture with students and faculty including Deputy Dean S P Kothari who served as host and moderator and Simon Johnson professor of entrepreneurship and former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund Johnson joined Nowotny on a panel along with Hannes Androsch Austria s former minister of finance and former vice chancellor With inflation low and interest rates at record lows the ECB finds itself in uncharted territory said Nowotny as efforts continue to revive the eurozone economies We have to be aware that monetary policy has limitations It has to be decided how Europe will find a balance between monetary policy fiscal policy and fiscal discipline and reforms He expressed hope that policymakers would see these areas as complementary rather than as alternatives to each other The ECB has introduced a new program to begin buying assets an approach that the U S Federal Reserve Bank has taken with its extensive bond purchasing effort since the financial crisis but that is something quite new for the ECB said Nowotny The central bank will also begin supervising the largest European banks starting in November taking responsibility for the oversight of some 80 percent of the region s collective bank balance sheet We are aware that taking up responsibility for supervision of the banks is a very risky affair for central banks but somebody has to do it said Nowotny The move will make the ECB one of the world s largest bank supervisors The objective said the governor is to provide a higher

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-eurozone.php (2015-03-14)
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  • Cross-campus collaboration at Hacking Arts - MIT Sloan School of Management
    Photo Ahmad El Nemr Hacking Arts organizers Michael DiBenigno and Liz Thys both MBA 15 Photo Ahmad El Nemr Some 350 people attended Hacking Arts 2014 many of them drawn to the prospect of hacking for long hours throughout the weekend to develop new apps business plans or hardware and perhaps win a prize for their endeavors Some of the participants made considerable efforts to travel to MIT including two members of the team that won the top prize for Best Overall Hack Two French PhD candidates at École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris Lyes Hammadouche and Ianis Lallemand heard about Hacking Arts and decided to come to the United States just for the event They came with the outline of an idea to develop a way to create physical representations of the time that people spend on their mobile devices On Friday night people with hacking ideas were given one minute to make their pitch as the first step toward building a team Hammadouche and Lallemand approached the microphone together to describe their idea and by evening s end they had assembled a five person team Team member Pasquale Totaro a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering at MIT said that he and two others Mariana Gutheim a student at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and Efi Marcus Goffer a mechanical engineer from Tel Aviv University in Israell were interested in the tangible aspect of the idea The interface between digital data and its physical materialization is a topic we are very interested in as artists Totaro said After the team formed and discussed the idea the members decided that they wanted to build a machine that would turn data into a tangible artifact Team members estimated that they spent 13 or 14 hours over the next two days working on their hack They built a cardboard cone that they placed on a small platform that rotated powered by a small motor operated by a microcontroller They then employed the TouchOSC app to transmit the phone user s touch coordinates to another app that analyzed the user s gestures and communicated them to the microcontroller They called their project Tomorrow Is Another Day During the event s culminating episode presentations on Sunday in the MIT Media Lab the team demonstrated what they d built The cone began to rotate as Lallemand held aloft a smartphone and began to move a finger along its touchpad An ink filled table tennis ball attached to a wire emerged from the top of the cone and drew a graph on the rotating surface depicting the speed and direction of Lallemand s finger movements drawing oohs and aahs from the crowd Tomorrow is Another Day won a 1 000 prize for Best Overall Hack The group was one of 16 hacking teams that gave presentations that day and one of four to win a prize Other winning projects were Luxloop which won Best Hack in Film TV and

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-hacking-arts.php (2015-03-14)
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  • Leading in tough times - MIT Sloan School of Management
    past and looking backward Hockfield said Hockfield together with now president then Provost L Rafael Reif Executive Vice President and Treasurer Israel Ruiz SM 01 who was vice president for finance at the time and Theresa M Stone SM 76 who was then executive vice president and treasurer worked hard to engage the community and balance the budget We had the sense that this was the way to manage a crisis she said Let s bring everyone in and solve it together As soon as the budget was balanced the 2008 recession hit But Hockfield noted there were ways in which MIT was better poised to weather a recession than some of its peers The schools we compare ourselves to have larger endowments than MIT she said While the recession hit all of our sources of revenue the value of our endowment dropped very very seriously So because MIT uses less of an endowment to support our total revenue source we were in a little bit of a better position Hockfield who is also a professor of neuroscience said she was initially a reluctant leader She was on the faculty of the Yale School of Medicine when she was tapped to be dean of the Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1998 In 2003 she was named the university s provost I did not imagine for an instant that any kind of academic leadership would be in my career plan I was so delighted and blessed to discover scientific research as my passion and to be able to do it in great places Academic leadership is a bit of any oxymoron Academics don t think they need leaders and I was certainly in that camp she recalled Her time in the administration at Yale helped Hockfield understand how

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-susan-hockfield.php (2015-03-14)
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  • Good questions: A conversation with leadership expert Hal Gregersen - MIT Sloan School of Management
    don t know This creates the most dangerous blind spot but many executives are not actively working to uncover it That s why Kodak dove under That s why Nokia dove under And the global list goes on where senior leaders failed to explore the crucial blind spots that came back to destroy their companies It s a dangerous emotional space for most executives to enter and they avoid it at all costs A critical question for any executive to answer is How long ago did someone ask you a question that caused you to feel uncomfortable If the answer is more than seven days it s time for a leadership shake up because the bad news that you need to hear is likely not making it your way Is that type of inquisitiveness based on talent and intuition or can it be learned I taught Leading Organizations to the MIT Executive MBA class this summer and it was a powerful learning experience both for me and many of them At the beginning some were skeptical about why I asked them to keep a questioning journal about all the questions they had related to the course content as well as any insights gained During class we also practiced a methodology that I call catalytic questioning Each student identified a professional challenge for which they honestly did not have a solution but wanted one They shared their challenge with two other peers in class and then spent four fast and furious minutes brainstorming nothing but questions about their challenge Almost everybody walked away with a different perspective or angle on the challenge as they uncovered new questions that they d never considered before And those new questions were just like keys that unlock a door only in this case they opened up entirely new avenues of action I ve found the same response working with thousands of executives around the world Most leaders know that asking the right questions makes a difference but they re hard pressed when it comes to teaching anyone else how to do it That s the core of what I m trying to achieve through The 4 24 Project which is a non profit organization I founded dedicated to keeping questioning skills alive so individuals can pass this skill onto the next generation of leaders How will you continue your work on questioning at MIT Sloan I believe that powerful insights come from deep interactions across disciplinary boundaries MIT is world class when it comes to technology and science and then you combine that with a world class business school it s unbeatable Before joining MIT I thought There must be some really incredible things going on there After joining MIT I discovered that data backed up my hunch MIT alumni have started or lead companies that collectively account for the 11th largest economy in the world Now my hunch is that to do what they ve done MIT alumni must have been asking different better

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-hal-gregersen-interview.php (2015-03-14)
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  • Trust me: how cultural behaviors impact supply chain efficiency - MIT Sloan School of Management
    s say you plan to sell skateboards in the U S that are produced in China You don t want to run out before Christmas so you puff up your demand forecast Factory managers now have to determine how many skateboard decks to build If your forecast is too ambitious they re on the hook for the extra boards collecting dust in the warehouse The parties need to share information but incentive conflicts deter people from always sharing Zheng says She brings a fresh approach to this problem which has long plagued supply chains This is a somewhat classic model that has been analyzed by many researchers says MIT Sloan operations management professor Retsef Levi But until now Levi says researchers were oblivious to the behavioral and cultural factors that actually play a major role If you ignore them you may get the wrong answer That s a mistake few companies can afford Merchandise exchanged between the U S and China now accounts for three percent of global trade volume and China has become the world s largest exporter and trader The research builds on earlier work Zheng conducted for her PhD at Stanford University where she interned at HP Labs She noticed that HP used simple price agreements with non binding forecasts instead of contracts loaded with financial motivations Retailers tell them demand and HP decides how many to build Theoretically that should never work Zheng says In reality she says It worked sometimes and not other times She decided to figure out why In her first study Zheng recruited 32 Stanford undergrads for a two hour simulation In an experiment echoing MIT Sloan s Beer Game supply chain exercise each student was cast as either a retailer submitting demand forecast for a product or a supplier who had to interpret that forecast and decide how many units to manufacture The pretend product was never named Zheng and her fellow researchers did not want subjects to introduce a personal perception about the cost or demand of say smartphones or jumbo jets The researchers set demand volatility and cost of production both high and low and recorded the participants decisions The students were paid up to 75 depending on the outcome of their faux business dealings Zheng found that production cost made the most impact on how much partners trusted each other Using that result as a baseline Zheng investigated how different cultural orientations impacted trust She ran the study again this time with 186 students at the University of Texas at Dallas and Tsinghua University in China In one time transactions Zheng says Chinese subjects playing the retailer role inflated their forecasts to be twice as high as those of their stateside counterparts when playing the manufacturer role they adjusted production to be more than 50 percent less than what their American counterparts delivered These lower levels of spontaneous trust and trustworthy conduct resulted in a 10 percent loss in supply chain efficiency and profit However when Chinese playing

    Original URL path: http://mitsloan.mit.edu/newsroom/2014-karen-zheng.php (2015-03-14)
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