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  • What is Academic Integrity? | Academic Integrity at MIT
    no matter what level of stress you may find yourself under MIT expects you to approach your work with honesty and integrity Honesty is the foundation of good academic work Whether you are working on a problem set lab report project or paper avoid engaging in plagiarism unauthorized collaboration cheating or facilitating academic dishonesty Follow this advice Plagiarism Do Don t Trust the value of your own intellect Don t purchase papers or have someone write a paper for you Undertake research honestly and credit others for their work Don t copy ideas data or exact wording without citing your source Unauthorized Collaboration Do Don t Trust the value of your own intellect Don t collaborate with another student beyond the extent specifically approved by the instructor Cheating Do Don t Demonstrate your own achievement Don t copy answers from another student don t ask another student to do your work for you Don t fabricate results Don t use electronic or other devices during exams Accept corrections from the instructor as part of the learning process Don t alter graded exams and submit them for re grading Do original work for each class Don t submit projects or papers

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/ (2015-10-07)
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  • Working Under Pressure | Academic Integrity at MIT
    contact him her via email TAs expect to be contacted it is part of their job to help you Ask your instructor for an extension Instructors would much rather give you an extension or accommodate you in some other way than see you violate academic integrity Get academic support Take advantage of the variety of tutoring resources available at MIT Work with the Writing and Communication Center when you need help on a writing assignment Get help from the MIT Libraries subject experts who can help you start your research or answer questions at any stage in the research process Ask for advice Undergraduates can talk to one of the deans in Student Support Services S 3 who can provide advice on both academic and personal challenges as well as advocacy and consultation with faculty Graduate students can talk to the deans in the Office of the Dean for Graduate Education ODGE who can provide advice and support on a variety of issues including faculty student relationships academic progress interpersonal concerns and a student s rights and responsibilities Talk to your academic advisor who can provide insight and guidance and potentially advocate with your instructor or supervisor on your behalf Graduate students can talk to another student through the REFS Resources For Easing Friction and Stress peer support programs which are department based and run by graduate students Manage your time Use the time management guidelines on MIT s Center for Academic Excellence ACADEX site to help you plan a schedule balance your priorities and get tips on ways to save time Good time management will help you stay productive on track and reduce stress Give your mind a break Students often put pressure on themselves to succeed Even if you re used to getting A s that might not

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/working-under-pressure (2015-10-07)
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  • What are the Consequences | Academic Integrity at MIT
    determines what action is appropriate to take Such action may include requiring the student to redo the assignment for a reduced grade assigning the student a failing grade for the assignment assigning the student a failing grade for the class For a research project the supervisor determines what action is appropriate to take Such action may include terminating the student s participation in the research project The instructor or supervisor may also submit documentation to the Office of Student Citizenship in the form of a letter to file or a formal complaint These options are outlined below Letter to file The instructor or supervisor writes a letter describing the nature of the academic integrity violation which is placed in the student s discipline file The student s discipline file is maintained by the Office of Student Citizenship OSC and is not associated with the student s academic record A letter may be filed with the OSC in addition to the action already taken in the class or research project If a student receives a letter to file s he has the right to submit a reply that is added to the student s file appeal the letter to the Committee on Discipline COD for a full hearing In resolving the violation described in the letter the OSC reviews any previous violations which are documented in the student s discipline file Committee on Discipline COD complaint The instructor or supervisor submits a formal complaint to the COD which resolves cases of alleged student misconduct This complaint may be filed with the OSC in addition to the action already taken in the class or research project A COD complaint is reviewed by the COD Chair and considered for a hearing Any previous violations documented in the student s discipline file are reviewed

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/academic-integrity-mit/what-are-consequences (2015-10-07)
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  • Responsible and Ethical Conduct of Research | Academic Integrity at MIT
    conflicts of interest and collaborative research OSP also provides a summary of all MIT policies affecting research Students involved in research should also review the Relations and Responsibilities section of the Responsible Conduct at MIT site This provides specific policies on personal conduct harassment retaliation and responsibilities of supervisors For further questions or issues dealing with responsible conduct of research your research supervisor department Ombuds Office and the Office of

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/academic-integrity-mit/responsible-and-ethical-conduct-research (2015-10-07)
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  • About the Handbook | Academic Integrity at MIT
    MIT you will be required to complete assignments based on oral communication and writing some of which will require research in libraries and laboratories and accessing electronic resources MIT anticipates that you will pursue your studies with purpose and integrity The cornerstone of scholarship in all academic disciplines is honesty MIT expects that you will approach everything you do here honestly whether solving a math problem writing a research or critical paper or writing an exam Some of you may be coming from educational systems where rules of academic integrity were not clearly defined or enforced Others may be studying in the United States for the first time and may have different and culturally based understandings of academic integrity To ensure that all MIT students understand the high academic standards of the Institute we have prepared this handbook to help guide you when you approach the writing research coding and test taking tasks your classes will demand of you This handbook outlines important information you will need to know about correctly acknowledging your sources when you write a report research paper critical essay or position paper It provides guidelines for collaboration on assignments and writing code The handbook also provides information about what constitutes violations of academic integrity and the consequences of committing such violations Please familiarize yourself with this material before you begin work in your classes and use it as a resource when you have questions at MIT and beyond Ignorance is never an excuse for academic dishonesty Publication date August 2012 Last Update July 2014 Written by Patricia Brennecke Lecturer in the MIT English Language Studies Program from 1996 2012 Edited by Anna Babbi Klein Communications Manager Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Education Many thanks to the Academic Integrity Working Group members for their invaluable input

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/academic-integrity-mit/about-handbook (2015-10-07)
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  • What is Plagiarism | Academic Integrity at MIT
    cultures the concept of owning words that are arranged in a particular sequence may seem strange Students from these cultures may have been encouraged to repeat the words of others and incorporate them into their own writing without quoting or otherwise indicating that they came from another source Other cultures accept the practice of copying phrases or sentences into a paper without using quotation marks as long as the writer shows where they came from These practices are not acceptable in North American academic culture Creative expression of ideas through words images and other media is the lifeblood of this academic culture For this reason we expect that our original expressions should not be used by others without attribution and acknowledgment Plagiarism occurs when you use another s words ideas assertions data or figures and do not acknowledge that you have done so If you use the words ideas or phrasing of another person or from published material you must Use quotation marks around the words and cite the source or Paraphrase or summarize acceptably and cite the source If you use charts graphs data sets or numerical information obtained from another person or from published material you must also

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/what-plagiarism (2015-10-07)
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  • Avoiding Plagiarism - Cite Your Source | Academic Integrity at MIT
    etc at the end of your paper in the bibliography also called the works cited or references page depending on the style you use Note Different disciplines use different citation styles as do various journals within a single discipline If you are unsure which to use check with your instructor In giving formal presentations it means You acknowledge on your slide where the graph chart or other information came from In writing a computer program it means You use comments to credit the source of any code you adapted from an open source site or other external sources Generally providing a URL is sufficient You also need to follow the terms of any open source license that applies to the code you are using Why should I cite my sources To show your readers that you have done your research To give credit to others for work they have done To point your readers to sources that may be useful to them To allow your readers to check your sources if there are questions Citing sources points the way for other scholars Future generations of engineers scientists and leaders will look to work done at MIT to solve some of the world s greatest problems Citation helps that process continue What should I cite Print sources books journal articles newspaper any material published on paper Electronic sources Articles retrieved from databases such as Lexis Nexis and ProQuest Personal and organizational websites Government and institutional websites Blogs Email messages Social media such as Tweets and Facebook pages Computer source code In short any material published or made available on the Internet Data geospatial GIS data Census economic and other types of data published by governments data from surveys economic indicators bioinformatics data Images charts graphs tables illustrations architectural plans photographs Recorded

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/citing-your-sources/avoiding-plagiarism-cite-your-source (2015-10-07)
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  • What is Common Knowledge | Academic Integrity at MIT
    audience of non experts A statement reporting that 24 of children under the age of 18 live in households headed by single mothers would need to be cited This is information that would not be known to the average reader who would want to know where the figure was obtained The best advice is When in doubt cite your source Which of the following statements would be considered common knowledge Which would need to be cited The Big Bang theory posits that the universe began billions of years ago with an enormous explosion The phrase Big Bang was coined by Sir Fred Hoyle an English astronomer Hoyle used the term to mock the theory which he disagreed with According to the Big Bang model the initial explosion was produced when an infinitely hot dense center referred to as a singularity began to expand giving rise to the particles that eventually formed into our universe Statement 1 is common knowledge the Big Bang theory is widely accepted among scientists and the term is used regularly in everyday speech Statement 2 needs citation this information is very specific and may even be unknown to some physicists Statement 3 would not need citation to an audience of physics students but would need citation in a paper for a non expert audience What is not Common Knowledge Datasets generated by you or others Statistics obtained from sources such as the US Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics References to studies done by others Reference to specific dates numbers or facts the reader would not know unless s he had done the research Examples of statements that need citation each refers to work done by others statistics or specific information that would not be known by the average reader Researchers have found that

    Original URL path: http://integrity.mit.edu/handbook/citing-your-sources/what-common-knowledge (2015-10-07)
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