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  • MIT Department of Physics
    Departmental Committees Society of Physics Students Physics Graduate Student Council Undergraduate Women in Physics Graduate Women in Physics Alumni and Friends Events Events Upcoming Events Pappalardo Fellowships Symposium Colloquium Schedule Department Calendar Boston Area Physics Calendar Other Physics Events Giving Giving Giving to Physics Alumni Friends Profiles physics mit Green Center for Physics Pappalardo Fellowships MIT Alumni Association Policies News News Stories Faculty Awards Honors physics mit Events Physics MIT Journal Issue Fall 2008 Message from the Department Head 4 New Faculty 6 Faculty Staff Notes 9 News Events in Physics 14 In Remembrance 20 Student Honors Awards 23 Student Profile 29 Alumni ae Notes 51 Giving to the Department of Physics 56 Donors 61 High Temperature Superconductivity One Atom at a Time 32 For over twenty years high temperature superconductivity has defied explanation Amazingly complex electronic interactions and resultant material properties have enticed many to try Has this complexity masked a simpler picture New experiments answer perhaps BY ERIC HUDSON Exoplanet Mass Radius and the Search for Habitable Worlds 40 Over 300 exoplanets are known to orbit nearby sun like stars Yet little is known about exoplanets beyond their minimum masses and orbit characteristics Fortunately a subset of exoplanets

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/news/physicsatmit/fall2008.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    Office Hours All Subjects Academic Calendar Course 8 Catalog Physics on OCW Research Research Research Areas Affiliated Labs Centers Pappalardo Fellowships in Physics People People Faculty Directory Academic Staff Directory Administrative Staff Directory Pappalardo Fellows Directory Postdoctoral Scholars Departmental Committees Society of Physics Students Physics Graduate Student Council Undergraduate Women in Physics Graduate Women in Physics Alumni and Friends Events Events Upcoming Events Pappalardo Fellowships Symposium Colloquium Schedule Department Calendar Boston Area Physics Calendar Other Physics Events Giving Giving Giving to Physics Alumni Friends Profiles physics mit Green Center for Physics Pappalardo Fellowships MIT Alumni Association Policies News News Stories Faculty Awards Honors physics mit Events Physics MIT Journal Issue Fall 2007 Message from the Department Head 4 News Events in Physics 7 New Faculty 18 Faculty Notes 21 In Remembrance 24 Student Honors Awards 26 Alumni ae Notes 57 Giving to the Department of Physics 62 Donors 68 Southern Skies and Cosmic Questions 32 How big is the observable universe What is it made of Why does space repel itself Eminent theoretical astrophysicist and new Physics Department Head Ed Bertschinger deftly guides us toward the answers to these cosmic questions when he takes us along an MIT alumni journey

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/news/physicsatmit/fall2007.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    the Standard Model of particle physics such as the Higgs boson Recent work has focused on predictions from models with several interacting fields and whether multifield models produce new features that could be observed in the cosmic microwave background radiation compared to single field models Much of this work has also concerned interactions between matter and gravity that extend beyond Einstein s general relativity and whether such nonminimal couplings might account for specific observable features in the spectrum of primordial perturbations For a brief and accessible introduction to this work see Elegant Wiggles Why the Universe is Lumpy I have also studied how such inflationary expansion might have come to an end in a process called reheating when the energy that had driven the rapid expansion was converted into particles more like the kind we see around us today In many models the decay of this inflationary energy occurs resonantly somewhat akin to a laser rather than an ordinary light bulb far from equilibrium In some cases these resonant interactions can amplify large gravitational fluctuations which might in principle prove detectable in the cosmic microwave background radiation Moreover the techniques used to study the dynamics of reheating can also be applied to many other kinds of interactions such as phase transitions in condensed matter physics and in nuclear physics For my work on reheating and gravitational fluctuations I have collaborated with Bruce Bassett and Roy Maartens Another topic of interest is the behavior of gravity in models in which our universe has more than four dimensions Higher dimensional theories have many motivations such as superstring theories Interesting questions arise when one tries to understand cosmological consequences such as the expansion rate of the universe or the strength of gravity over various distance scales of these higher dimensional models For this work I have collaborated with Alan Guth Philip Mannheim and Ali Nayeri For a review see Inflationary Cosmology A complementary line of inquiry focuses on the complex dynamics of networks with applications to understanding the growth and development of scientific research fields a cross between statistical mechanics and the history and sociology of science Together with Luis Bettencourt I have been exploring whether the critical dynamics of topological phase transitions in scientists collaboration networks might betray signs of universality Research areas in fields as disparate as theoretical physics and biomedicine might undergo the same basic teamwork and co authorship mechanisms early in their histories even though they involve vastly different numbers of researchers and published articles per year Biographical Sketch David Kaiser is Germeshausen Professor of the History of Science and Department Head of MIT s Program in Science Technology and Society and also Professor of Physics in MIT s Department of Physics He completed an A B in physics at Dartmouth College and Ph D s in physics and the history of science at Harvard University Kaiser s historical research focuses on the development of physics in the United States during the Cold War looking at how the discipline

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/kaiser_david.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    Current Subjects Office Hours All Subjects Academic Calendar Course 8 Catalog Physics on OCW Research Research Research Areas Affiliated Labs Centers Pappalardo Fellowships in Physics People People Faculty Directory Academic Staff Directory Administrative Staff Directory Pappalardo Fellows Directory Postdoctoral Scholars Departmental Committees Society of Physics Students Physics Graduate Student Council Undergraduate Women in Physics Graduate Women in Physics Alumni and Friends Events Events Upcoming Events Pappalardo Fellowships Symposium Colloquium Schedule Department Calendar Boston Area Physics Calendar Other Physics Events Giving Giving Giving to Physics Alumni Friends Profiles physics mit Green Center for Physics Pappalardo Fellowships MIT Alumni Association Policies News News Stories Faculty Awards Honors physics mit Events Physics MIT Journal Issue Fall 2006 Message from the Department Head 4 New Faculty 6 Faculty Notes 15 News Events in Physics 19 Student Honors Awards 26 Alumni ae Notes 51 Giving to the Department of Physics 58 Leadership Gifts to the Green Center for Physics 58 Donors 93 Resonating with Feshbach 32 Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek shares his personal perspective on the influence of MIT hero Herman Feshbach 1917 2000 on present day physics in particular the wide ranging impact of the phenomenon known as Feshbach resonance BY FRANK WILCZEK Photonic

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/news/physicsatmit/fall2006.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    s Photonics and Modern Electro Magnetics Group Page MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics Area of Physics Condensed Matter Theory Research Interests Technological advances of the past decade have enabled the control of the material structure at length scales smaller than the wavelength of light This enabled the creation of new materials e g photonic bandgap crystals or various surface plasmon systems whose optical properties are dramatically different than those of any naturally occurring material For example nanostructured materials which display diffraction less propagation of light exhibit negative refraction or support very slow propagation of light have all been demonstrated Professor Soljacic s interests are in exploring the new and exciting physical phenomena supported by these materials The unique properties of these new materials have already enabled a wide range of very important applications e g in medicine telecommunications defense etc and are expected to do so even more in the future Professor Soljači is also interested in various topics in nonlinear optical physics Maxwell s equations as presented in most undergraduate text books are linear However all materials in nature are nonlinear including vacuum and sure enough at high light intensities optical phenomena become nonlinear displaying a wide range of rich and beautiful behavior For example almost every general non linear dynamics phenomenon e g solitons pattern formation fractals etc can now be studied in optical material systems Professor Soljacic is also interested in investigating the feasibility of wireless power transfer which he and colleagues have dubbed WiTricity Biographical Sketch Marin Soljačić received a BsE degree in physics and a BsE degree in electrical engineering from MIT in 1996 He earned his PhD in physics at Princeton University in 2000 In September 2000 he was named an MIT Pappalardo Fellow in Physics and in 2003 was appointed a Principal Research

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/soljacic_marin.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    Areas Affiliated Labs Centers Pappalardo Fellowships in Physics People People Faculty Directory Academic Staff Directory Administrative Staff Directory Pappalardo Fellows Directory Postdoctoral Scholars Departmental Committees Society of Physics Students Physics Graduate Student Council Undergraduate Women in Physics Graduate Women in Physics Alumni and Friends Events Events Upcoming Events Pappalardo Fellowships Symposium Colloquium Schedule Department Calendar Boston Area Physics Calendar Other Physics Events Giving Giving Giving to Physics Alumni Friends Profiles physics mit Green Center for Physics Pappalardo Fellowships MIT Alumni Association Policies News News Stories Faculty Awards Honors physics mit Events Physics MIT Journal Issue Fall 2005 Message from the Department Head 4 New Faculty 6 Faculty Notes 8 News Events in Physics 12 In Remembrance 18 Student Honors Awards 21 Alumni ae Notes 48 Giving to the Department of Physics 93 Donors 93 Cosmic Dawn Hunting for the First Stars in the Universe 26 Akin to an investigative detective tracing steps backward in time astrophysicist Rob Simcoe describes the methods used to uncover the cosmic clues to understanding the mysteries of How When and Why the first stars were born BY ROBERT SIMCOE Generating Single Photons on Demand 34 Atomic physicist Vladan Vuletic explains how to create single photons

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/news/physicsatmit/fall2005.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    the development of optical infrared instrumentation for ground based astronomy and the observation of galaxies and intergalactic matter at the epoch when the universe was 5 10 of its present age In particular he has worked to improve characterizations of the spatial distribution of elements heavier than Hydrogen and Helium at early times In the wake of the Big Bang the universe is thought to have been primarily composed of H and He with nearly all large scale production of heavier elements taking place through nuclear fusion in the cores of the first stars When these stars ended their lifetimes they exploded as supernovae and polluted intergalactic space with newly formed chemicals By studying the strength and spatial variation of intergalactic oxygen and carbon at early epochs Simcoe has been working toward an understanding of when and where the first stars in the universe were formed Further work in correlating the locations of early galaxies with heavy elements in the nearby intergalactic medium is also leading to some of the the first direct physical characterizations of the cycle of galaxy formation supernova feedback and chemical enrichment during the peak era of star formation over cosmic time Infrared astronomical spectroscopy is an essential tool for studying these earliest epochs and Simcoe has been active in developing new instrumentation toward this end In 2010 his group commissioned FIRE a fully cryogenic infrared spectrometer on the 6 5 meter Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory Chile His group in the Optical IR lab of the MIT Kavli Institute continues to work on development of IR instrumentation for specialized applications such as exoplanet transit photometry Biographical Sketch Robert A Simcoe came to MIT as a Pappalardo Postdoctoral Fellow in Physics in 2003 He specializes in observational astrophysics with particular emphasis on the chemistry of galaxies and intergalactic matter in the early universe An amateur astronomer and telescope maker from his youth Simcoe went on to earn his A B in Astrophysical Sciences from Princeton in 1997 and his Ph D in Astronomy from Caltech in 2003 He joined the MIT Physics faculty in 2006 after which he served as PI and Project Scientist for the FIRE infrared spectrometer a facility instrument for the 6 5 meter Magellan telescopes He was awarded an Alfred P Sloan foundation research fellowship in 2009 Selected Publications Popular Articles Cosmic Dawn Hunting for the First Stars in the Universe Robert Simcoe physics mit Fall 2005 The Cosmic Web Observations and simulations of the intergalactic medium reveal the largest structures in the universe Robert A Simcoe American Scientist January February 2004 Research Articles A Survey of MgII Absorption at 2 z 6 with Magellan FIRE I Sample and Evolution of the MgII Frequency Michael S Matejek Robert A Simcoe eprint arXiv 1201 3919 01 2012 Constraints on the Universal C IV Mass Density at z 6 from Early Infrared Spectra Obtained with the Magellan FIRE Spectrograph Robert A Simcoe Kathy L Cooksey Michael Matejek Adam J Burgasser John Bochanski Elizabeth

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/simcoe_robert.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MIT Department of Physics
    Physics Graduate Women in Physics Alumni and Friends Events Events Upcoming Events Pappalardo Fellowships Symposium Colloquium Schedule Department Calendar Boston Area Physics Calendar Other Physics Events Giving Giving Giving to Physics Alumni Friends Profiles physics mit Green Center for Physics Pappalardo Fellowships MIT Alumni Association Policies People Faculty Directory Academic Staff Directory Administrative Staff Directory Pappalardo Fellows Directory Postdoctoral Scholars Departmental Committees Society of Physics Students Physics Graduate Students Council Undergraduate Women in Physics Graduate Women in Physics MIT Association of Postdoctoral Scholars Alumni Friends Faculty VLADAN VULETI Lester Wolfe Professor of Physics Division Head Atomic Biological Condensed Matter and Plasma Physics EMAIL vuletic mit edu PHONE 617 324 1174 OFFICE 26 231 Labs 26 228 26 230 ASSISTANT Joanna M Keseberg 617 253 6830 RELATED LINKS Vuletic Research Group MIT Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms Research Laboratory of Electronics Area of Physics Atomic Physics Research Interests Laser cooling and trapping quantum physics quantum entanglement quantum optics quantum information processing Biographical Sketch Professor Vladan Vuletić was born in Pec Yugoslavia and educated in Germany In 1992 he earned the Physics Diploma with highest honors from the Ludwig Maximilians Universität München and in 1997 a Ph D in Physics summa cum

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/vuletic_vladan.html (2016-02-01)
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