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  • For Associate Advisors: Training & Development: Training Schedule & Registration
    Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Why Development is Important Training Schedule Registration Taking Care of Yourself Training Development Training Schedule Registration You are expected to participate in 2 training sessions per year If you are a returning associate advisor this is a great opportunity for you to share your experiences with new associate advisors Spring training will focus on the resources that are available for freshmen These resources although for all students are important for you to have knowledge of and understand in order to refer freshmen to them For the first time associate advisor training will center around the important campus resources that will help first year students succeed You may register for as many programs as you would like Once you register for an session you are expected to attend unless an unanticipated conflict arises In that case you must notify Leslie Bottari bottari mit edu 24 hours in advance Training Sessions Registration First Name Last Name Email QPR Suicide Awareness Wednesday February 10 5 6 00pm in West Lounge 2nd Fl Student Center Presenter Zan Barry Senior Program Manager Community Wellness at MIT Medical Global Education and Career Development Center Thursday February

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/develop/training.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Training & Development - Taking Care of Yourself
    Checklist Associate Advisor Position Description Application Recommender Form Associate Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Why Development is Important Training Schedule Registration Taking Care of Yourself Training Development Taking Care of Yourself Your commitment requires an investment of time as well as mental and emotional effort While it may be gratifying and rewarding to help others it may also take a toll on you If you want to be effective you must take care of yourself first Steps you can take to make sure you are taking care of yourself Reflect and acknowledge your accomplishments When you aim for perfection you can end up becoming discouraged if you fall short of your expectations When this happens it is important to reflect on what you have already accomplished Set up your own support system of friends family and faculty staff Avoid isolation and the self defeating trap of solving your difficulties alone Friends and family can help you through tough times by listening or reminding you of resources Student Support Services is not just for freshmen Take time to relax and reward yourself If you spend all of your time checking off your to do list you

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/develop/care.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals
    Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Becoming an Associate Application Checklist Associate Advisor Position Description Application Recommender Form Associate Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Confidentiality Communicating with Freshmen First Year Transition Active Listening Conflict Resolution What is Mentoring Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals - Confidentiality
    Application Recommender Form Associate Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Confidentiality Communicating with Freshmen First Year Transition Active Listening Conflict Resolution What is Mentoring Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Advising Fundamentals Confidentiality In dealing with student information you should always be aware of the need to protect students privacy In 1999 MIT approved a new Student Information Policy that complies with federal and state law and that explicitly addresses responsibilities for handling student information The Academic Guide outlines the policy Within the Institute student information i e registration records grades etc should be made available only to those officials with a legitimate need to know it With few exceptions it should NOT be made available to others including parents and guardians except with a student s specific written consent Guidelines for Associate Advisors You will not have access to certain aspects of your advisees student information such as grades etc but this does not mean that you can ignore confidentiality Do not share confidential information with friends and other residents Breaking confidentiality runs a

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/confide.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals - Communicating with Freshmen
    in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Advising Fundamentals Communicating with Freshmen Communication skills are essential for successful advising Providing information in a meaningful and clear way to your advisees and actively listening serves as a basis for their decisions How you communicate with your advisees can have a profound influence on a freshman s entire life Here are some helpful tips Allow your advisees or other freshmen to tell their story first do not interrupt their sentences offer advice or give suggestions unless asked to Keep similar feelings or problems from your own experience to a minimum and try not to give the impression that you want to jump right in and talk Appreciate the emotion voice intonation and body language behind words While this is not possible through email it is more obvious face to face Establish consistent eye contact and use affirmative head nods Avoid nervous or bored gestures and fight off external distractions Listen carefully and check your understanding Paraphrasing what someone has said or asking a question can help clarify meaning and determine that you re on the same page Ask open ended questions that enable you to discuss topics

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/communicate.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals - First-Year Transition
    Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Advising Fundamentals First Year Transition First year students face many obstacles as they transition to campus life and the academic rigor of MIT You can help your advisees face challenges by being observant to changes in their behavior and being accessible to offer your experience and guidance Going off to college can be a overwhelming experience for many students For some freshmen this may be the first time away from home family and friends They will be meeting people who are different than they are and may struggle with this adjustment You can have a lot of influence on freshmen during this time Being aware of these potential issues is the first step Friendships The first four to eight weeks of the first semester is when students form friendships that set a pattern for future interactions They may change or adapt their behavior to meet the expectations of their new peer group Tolerance First year students tend to view things as right or wrong Those who have not learned to share compromise and accept other people s views will experience interpersonal conflicts Values Students enter college with values most similar to those of their parents Meeting people with different values and beliefs force students to articulate why they believe what they do This can be distressing where the student cannot understand the difference between what they believe and values expressed by others Freedom Students react to their newfound independence by testing the boundaries through trial and experimentation Frequently this behavior can be personally destructive and disruptive to the living group Academics Adjusting to the new demands for studying more intense competition and enhanced

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/transition.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals - Active Listening
    with Freshmen First Year Transition Active Listening Conflict Resolution What is Mentoring Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Becoming an Associate Application Checklist Associate Advisor Position Description Application Recommender Form Associate Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Confidentiality Communicating with Freshmen First Year Transition Active Listening Conflict Resolution What is Mentoring Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Advising Fundamentals Active Listening First year students face many obstacles as they transition to campus life and the academic rigor of MIT When you learn how to manage your conflicts you are able to help your advisees with similar challenges A key factor that contributes to successful conflict resolution is founded on active listening The following lists role of active listening and identifies the active skills needed to achieve it Listening is powerful and important Good listening is helpful in and of itself Builds trust and rapport De escalates and calms Creates clarity Listening is a precursor

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/activelistening.html (2016-02-01)
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  • For Associate Advisors: Advising Fundamentals - Conflict Resolution
    Application Recommender Form Associate Advisor Contract Associate Advisor Steering Committee Description Steering Committee Application Confidentiality Communicating with Freshmen First Year Transition Active Listening Conflict Resolution What is Mentoring Developmental Advising Working with Freshmen in your Advising Group Organizing Advising Activities Working with Freshmen in your Dorm Organizing Academic Programs in Dorms Associate Advisor Steering Committee Advising Fundamentals Conflict Resolution As upperclass students you have experienced conflicts in many situations already

    Original URL path: http://web.mit.edu/firstyear/associates/fundamentals/conflict.html (2016-02-01)
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