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  • the house they grew up in Understanding how memories are retained and recalled has always intrigued researchers especially when seeking therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer s Researchers speculate that the lifespan of the connections that exist between neurons called synapses helps determine how long a memory lasts These connections will strengthen or weaken known as synaptic plasticity in response to increases or decreases in neuronal activity When the synapse s strength decreases the memory disappears View Original Article Source McGill Tribune Tags Li Huei Tsai Tsai Lab Recommended Posts Understanding the Aging Brain Glenn Foundation gift to MIT to fund multiple research initiatives on how we age The schizophrenia risk gene product miR 137 alters presynaptic plasticity News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton Lab Publications Miller Lab Publications Nedivi Lab

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20151106/summer-reseach-briefs-brain-power/ (2016-04-25)
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  • that become diseased causing a decline in our memory and ability to think But new research from Li Huei Tsai s lab suggests the immune system may also play a role in Alzheimer s The discovery is welcome news since so far clinical trials of Alzheimer s drugs that target neurons have been unsuccessful We really need a portfolio of targets says Tsai Picower Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Picower Institute of Learning and Memory View Original Article Tags Aging Brain Initiative Alzheimer s Neuroscience Tsai Lab Recommended Posts How the brain processes emotions A new glimpse into working memory Lost memories can be found News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton Lab Publications Miller Lab Publications Nedivi Lab Publications Sur Lab Publications Tonegawa Lab Publications Tsai Lab Publications Tye

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20151103/understanding-the-aging-brain/ (2016-04-25)
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  • and related neurodevelopmental disorders Mustafa Sahin Mriganka Sur Science DOI 10 1126 science aab3897 Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Featured News Lab News Media Mentions News Press Releases Sur Lab News Posted October 15 2015 Leveraging Genetic Diversity to Drive Precision Medicine Heterogeneity Presents Challenges and Opportunities for Treating Autism Genetic research suggests that hundreds of genes are likely risk factors for neurodevelopmental disorders like autism This Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Featured News Lab News Media Mentions News Press Releases Wilson Lab News Posted October 14 2015 Thinking and Dreaming are Different when it comes to Reward Replayed experiences include memory of rewards Spatial learning is what allows us to navigate in familiar environments and research has shown that there are specific areas of the brain Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Brown Lab News Featured News Lab News News Press Releases Wilson Lab News Posted October 13 2015 How the brain controls sleep Brain structure generates pockets of sleep within the brain Sleep is usually considered an all or nothing state The brain is either entirely awake or entirely asleep However MIT Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In News Publications Wilson Lab Publications Posted October 13 2015 Thalamic reticular nucleus induces fast and local modulation of arousal state Laura D Lewis Jakob Voigts Francisco J Flores Lukas I Schmitt Matthew A Wilson Michael M Halassa Emery N Brown eLife 2015 10 7554 eLife 08760 Read More Load More News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/2015/10/ (2016-04-25)
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  • the hippocampus and the VTA which are responsible for forming memories of rewarding experiences Until now it has been unclear whether the replay of recent events in wake and sleep states differs in terms of its impact on learning and memory In this study the neuroscientists observed that reactivation of spatial memory sequences that occurred while animals stopped during the task included information about the rewards that the animals expected to receive while the same memories replayed while the rats slept did not Wilson and his colleagues concluded that hippocampal dependent learning and memory are significantly influenced by reward mechanisms When dopamine cells are activated during spatial learning tasks the rewarded hippocampal neurons demonstrate an increased ability to replay events during awake states and stabilize subsequent spatial learning The researchers hypothesize that when dopamine induced neurons engage with the spatial content of reactivation experiences during wakefulness spatial memory performance improves Results of their study suggest that dopamine neurons replay their reward related activity in concert with reactivation activity occurring in the hippocampus Wakeful stabilization sets stage for memory consolidation Coordinated memory replay has been observed during sleep in previous studies of the primary visual cortex and hippocampal regions of the brain The current findings reinforce the theory that replay events engage both cortical and subcortical structures to create accurate memories of recent experiences One key difference however is the discovery that dopamine neurons coordinate with hippocampal replay differently during sleep and wakefulness A possible explanation for this distinction is that dopamine activity stabilizes replay sequences across brain regions during wakefulness preparing for subsequent memory consolidation processes during sleep In addition it s possible that the replay of experiences during sleep may lead to evaluations that conflict with goal directed behavior in wakefulness These misaligned associations may play a role in

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20151014/thinking-and-dreaming-are-different-when-it-comes-to-reward/ (2016-04-25)
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  • lead to treatments for depression PTSD If not for a broken piece of lab equipment and a college crush Steve Ramirez might never have gone into neuroscience As an undergraduate at Boston University his interests were all over the place He was taking a humanities course and classes in philosophy and biochemistry while working several hours a week in a biology lab When the lab s centrifuge a device that spins liquids broke Ramirez had to use one in another lab Read more Recent Posts How the brain processes emotions A new glimpse into working memory Lost memories can be found News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton Lab Publications Miller Lab Publications Nedivi Lab Publications Sur Lab Publications Tonegawa Lab Publications Tsai Lab Publications Tye Lab Publications Wilson Lab Publications Xu

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20150922/steve-ramirez-erasing-fear-memories/ (2016-04-25)
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  • 2015 Pages 1317 1331 Read More 1 By Joshua Sarinana In Featured News News Press Releases Tonegawa Lab News Posted September 23 2015 How the brain encodes time and place CAMBRIDGE MA When you remember a particular experience that memory has three critical elements what when and where MIT neuroscientists have now identified a brain circuit Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Featured News Lab News Media Mentions News Tonegawa Lab News Posted September 22 2015 Steve Ramirez Erasing fear memories Altering the brain s recollections may lead to treatments for depression PTSD If not for a broken piece of lab equipment and a college crush Steve Ramirez might never have gone into Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Featured News Lab News Media Mentions News Tonegawa Lab News Posted September 15 2015 Steve Ramirez Named 2015 Emerging Explorer Steve Ramirez Neuroscientist Can Memory Manipulation Research Crack the Code for Alzheimer s When Steve Ramirez was a child his cousin went into a coma during childbirth The incident Read More 0 By Joshua Sarinana In Publications Tonegawa Lab Publications Posted September 2 2015 Memory Engram Cells Have Come of Age Tonegawa S Liu X Ramirez S Redondo R Neuron 87 5 918 931 Read More Load More News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton Lab Publications Miller Lab Publications Nedivi Lab Publications Sur Lab Publications Tonegawa Lab Publications Tsai Lab

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/2015/09/ (2016-04-25)
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  • The incident led him to become fascinated by the way the brain works Today as a Ph D student at MIT s Brain and Cognitive Sciences department he is researching memory Can we manipulate consciousness by implanting or erasing memories Can we replace a bad memory with a good one Talking from his lab at MIT Ramirez explains how his parents El Salvadorian background shaped his character why his research may one day lead to a cure for Alzheimer s and how one day memory manipulation techniques could be used to treat psychiatric disorders like depression or PTSD Simon Worrall View Original Article Tags Neuroscience Tonegawa Lab Recommended Posts How the brain processes emotions A new glimpse into working memory Lost memories can be found News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20150915/steve-ramirez-named-2015-emerging-explorer/ (2016-04-25)
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  • Lab News News 0 Humans now have a lower attention span than goldfish according to new research A study by technology giant Microsoft has found that we stay focused for a mere eight seconds goldfish can manage nine before we are distracted by phone calls social media alerts or the news feed on our computers Multitasking might give us an instant hit of gratification and make us seem more efficient but it is having a detrimental effect on our productivity at work and our private lives So what are our devices doing to our brains and how can we improve our concentration Throughout history inventors have created devices without thinking closely about how people would actually use them says Dr David Rock author of Your Brain At Work The car is an example There were no road regulations or speed limits when people began getting behind the wheel and life on the road was crazy until we set up rules that took human nature into account he says View Original Article Source Post Magazine Tags Earl Miller focus Neuroscience productivity Recommended Posts How the brain processes emotions A new glimpse into working memory Lost memories can be found News Topics Media Mentions Press Releases Neuroscience News Picower e Newsletter Publications Featured News Lab News Bear Lab News Brown Lab News Chung Lab News Flavell Lab News Heiman Lab News Littleton Lab News Miller Lab News Nedivi Lab News Sur Lab News Tonegawa Lab News Tsai Lab News Tye Lab News Wilson Lab News Xu Lab News Publications Bear Lab Publications Brown Lab Publications Chung Lab Publications Flavell Lab Publications Heiman Lab Publications Littleton Lab Publications Miller Lab Publications Nedivi Lab Publications Sur Lab Publications Tonegawa Lab Publications Tsai Lab Publications Tye Lab Publications Wilson Lab Publications Xu Lab Publications Events

    Original URL path: https://picower.mit.edu/cms/20150621/how-being-constantly-connected-is-hurting-our-productivity/ (2016-04-25)
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