archive-edu.com » EDU » M » MIT.EDU

Total: 446

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • ashapiro | MIT Center for Civic Media
    than Ukraine etc Continue reading to see the charts Here we go Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Project Update w Charts ashapiro s blog Project Update Submitted by ashapiro on October 31 2011 9 42am Project Update In writing my introduction I had to ask myself some important questions Why does my project matter Why should we care about the impact of ICTs in Ukraine I came across an interesting article by Michael McFaul suggesting that the 2004 Orange Revolution in Ukraine may have been the first movement of its kind to be largely organized online The websites of advocacy groups like Maidan and Pora as well as the online newspaper Ukrainian Pravda exposed widespread corruption during the presidential election relayed logistical information to protesters setting up tents throughout the country sound like Occupy while SMS helped mobilize hundreds of thousands more not unlike TXTMob McFaul 2005 12 Long story short the popular pro democracy candidate Viktor Yushchenko won the election inspiring hope for both post Soviet democratization and the political potential of ICTs Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Project Update ashapiro s blog 10 19 Class Discussion Pt 2 Submitted by ashapiro on October 24 2011 9 37am During the second half of Intro to Civic Media on Wednesday Oct 19th we discussed the early days of digital civic media Our discussion was based on two readings How a Handful of Geeks Defied the USSR a blog post discussing the role of Usenet in disseminating information transnationally during the attempted military coup in Moscow in 1991 see usenet logs for detailed messages and How TXTMob Influenced Twitter which traced the origins of Twitter and other communication tools to text messaging Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/ashapiro?page=1 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ashapiro | MIT Center for Civic Media
    Downing are media generally small scale and in many different forms that express an alternative vision to hegemonic policies priorities and perspectives v 2001 In chapter IV of his book Radical Media Rebellious Communication and Social Movements Downing asks how radical media can strengthen democratic culture in everyday life stating that traditional analytical frameworks too often ignore the question of communication and the messy reality of democratizing media 42 Under these terms MAG Net s campaign Broadband to the People can be considered an attempt to promote radical media among America s often excluded rural communities by way of democratizing broadband access According to their website 37 of adult Americans do not have access to broadband a number that consists disproportionately of minorities the poor foreign born residents and non English speakers Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Radical Media in Rural Communities ashapiro s blog Yes but does your bowtie have tendrils Submitted by ashapiro on September 19 2011 9 54am Counterpublics refers to the groups of people that are marginalized and or excluded from what Habermas originally deemed the public sphere Their motivating ideologies and goals may be in opposition to mainstream politics as Squires asserts or they may simply be regarded as subversive due to their composition When those people gain access to new technologies that afford them greater connectivity they become networked Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Yes but does your bowtie have tendrils ashapiro s blog Week 2 Blog Post Submitted by ashapiro on September 12 2011 8 49am Civic media refers to the tools and technologies that facilitate the exchange of information and ideas between people often in pursuit of common goals Today traditional forms of media print radio etc have been overpowered by their

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/ashapiro?page=2 (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A Case Study of An Innovative Campaign Against Domestic Violence | MIT Center for Civic Media
    outcomes of critical events gain insights about the process thus far and document hopes for moving forward Even if people don t engage with domestic violence normally they still have questions that was what was so fascinating about the campaign explained Emily Shield 2012 the Program Coordinator at the Cambridge Commission on the Status of Women The format of this social movement campaign was especially interesting because it spurred reflection before it pointed to a solution The special thing about this campaign is that it does not critique judge or ever suggest short term action It takes a deeper look at violence What is it and what are the underlying issues How do we really interrupt the sources of violence said Jacqui Lindsey of Engage the Power the organization that created and facilitated question campaigns Successes of the campaign are listed below It effectively created a lot of buzz in the community about a topic that is usually embarrassing or difficult for people to discuss or acknowledge For the first time very different types of people were talking about the domestic violence movement in Cambridge The quality of questions was amazing They were emotional deep and strategic The questions pointed to a lot of different places and paths that need to be further explored to begin solving the domestic violence problem The design and visual branding of the campaign was excellent and provocative When people saw a poster or sign it seemed they were already familiar with the campaign which means our public relations efforts were effective Serra Interview 2012 At events campaign ambassadors gave people whiteboards to write their question and then photographed each person holding the whiteboard with their hand written question The photo displays of this through vojo co really helped show how domestic violence is an issue that affects a very diverse group of people It put a face to a question which makes the question even more powerful However challenges exsisted as well What happens when you ask people to submit questions about domestic violence People start telling you their stories And all these people are told about services available to them but there are actually not enough services for everyone When I was collecting questions with people in the street I was having 30 minute conversations with people who either experienced some form of abuse or knew someone who did We did have a resource sheet that had information about domestic violence with a whole list of services and how to access them explained Ester Serra a Domestiv Violence Advocate from Transition House Serra Interview 2012 Many of the questions collected during the campaign had a sense of urgency to them They were from people who were in trouble in that moment and needed help immediately When ambassadors were out in the field collecting questions it was not always easy to convince people to use technology to submit via vojo Over 1000 questions were collected but a little less than half were contributed through

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta/a-case-study-of-an-innovative-campaign-against-domestic-violence (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Aditi Mehta's blog | MIT Center for Civic Media
    The organization was founded by MIT DUSP Professor Ceasar McDowell Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Final Project Revisited 21 Days Cambridge Theory of Social Change Submitted by Aditi Mehta on October 9 2012 12 48am Last class my group designed two theory of social change diagrams One diagram demonstrated the process an individual goes through when trying to improve or modify his or her environment It assumed that the sociopolitical surroundings of that individual allowed for a simple and accessible democratic process and that local politicians and stakeholders act in the interest of the individual In that process the individual first assesses the surroundings and decides what about status quo needs to change Next the individual takes this concern or idea to a local politician and engages others in the community around the issue encouraging them to also reach out to local politicians Together all stakeholders form a strategy and take action Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Theory of Social Change Summary of Week 5 The Political Economy of Communications Submitted by Aditi Mehta on October 5 2012 11 55am We began class on October 3rd by reviewing ideas for our final projects Throughout the week students blogged about their proposals Project topics range from Hip Hop Culture in Civic Media to Supermarket Pastoralism to the Ethics of Activist DDOS Actions Sasha encouraged us to really push ourselves to think deeply about the intersection between our subject areas participatory media making and civic action This in essence is at the heart of civic media Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Summary of Week 5 The Political Economy of Communications Civic Media in Chinatown Then and Now Submitted by Aditi Mehta on October 2 2012 1 12am For the past three years I have been tracking Boston Chinatown s movement to locate a branch of the Boston Public Library in their neighborhood In order to understand the meaning and function of this needed public space in an immigrant enclave I not only interviewed various community members and stakeholders but also consulted several forms of media that discussed the Chinatown Library This material took the form of newspaper articles from well known sources local television coverage radio archives community group newsletters posters Chinatown newspapers and pamphlets as well as Chinatown and other Boston resident blog posts While I was tracking the history of the branch library and the grassroots movement to regain one in Chinatown I did not really pay attention to the history and evolution of civic media in Chinatown Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Civic Media in Chinatown Then and Now Reflection A Model of Digital Inclusion Submitted by Aditi Mehta on September 17 2012 11 10pm Last class we formed small groups to create a model of digital inclusion My group tried to create a tool that would help us assess if and to what extent a community was digitally

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 21 Days Cambridge: The Question Review Panel | MIT Center for Civic Media
    interests include immigration affordable housing participatory planning processes and community media 21 Days Cambridge The Question Review Panel Submitted by Aditi Mehta on December 6 2012 10 11pm Question Review Panel reading and discussing submissions for Domestic Violence Campaign For my final project in Civic Media I am writing a case study about the 21 Days of Questions 365 Days of Action Domestic Violence Campaign in Cambridge Massachusetts The Campaign aims to collect questions about domestic violence from as many people as possible from the Cambridge community via text e mail phone using the vojo co platform as well as through paper submissions The idea is that meaningful questions from the public can help shape a broader actionable agenda around the issue Throughout the past month over 1 000 questions were collected Approximately 500 were submitted electronically through vojo and the other 500 were hand collected or submitted on paper A random sample of about 300 questions were intensely studied and coded by the planning committee to recognize emergent themes These themes were Defining Domestic Violence 68 Questions Support for Stopping and Recovering 88 Questions Children and Teens 70 Questions Prevention and Eradication 32 Questions Once these themes were established

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta/21-days-cambridge-the-question-review-panel (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Question Campaign: A Case Study | MIT Center for Civic Media
    10 42pm In my last post I decided that for my final Civic Media project I would write a case study about the 21 Days Question Campaign on Domestic Violence recently launched by the City of Cambridge The purpose of this case study is two fold 1 to demonstrate how a question campaign can effectively engage diverse community members around a single cause and 2 to understand why this sort of campaign is especially useful in creating public awareness around and fighting domestic violence Below is an outline the case study will follow I Introduction I will introduce Engage the Power other partners and the Question Campaign model and present the research questions a How did the City of Cambridge use the question campaign model to start a campaign against domestic violence b What did organizers of the campaign learn from the process c What do Cambridge residents and community members who participated in the campaign expect from the submission of their questions II Literature Review I will discuss other examples of large scale campaigns around domestic violence and explain the pros and cons of different methodologies III Overview of 21 Days of Questions 365 Days of Action I will provide a narrative of Cambridge s campaign describe the major players and partners and history of the effort as well as how it has unfolded at community events and on the Internet IV Research Findings In order to answer the above questions I will conduct interviews with city officials organizations working to fight domestic violence and aid victims in Cambridge as well as other members of the movement I will also interview community members who submit a question I will monitor the vojo co site where questions are collected and take notes on updates and trends I attended the launch

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta/question-campaign-a-case-study (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Final Project Revisited: 21 Days Cambridge | MIT Center for Civic Media
    around the 21 Days Question Campaign Against Domestic Violence in Cambridge The City of Cambridge approached the organization Engage the Power EtP to help design a campaign against domestic violence EtP helps communities set political agendas by designing question campaigns Engage the Power believes in the power of the question to hold decision makers accountable as well as to help facilitate knowledge exchange and collective action The organization was founded by MIT DUSP Professor Ceasar McDowell Starting on October 17th Cambridge residents workers community members and other stakeholders will submit questions via social media about domestic violence Vojo is the online platform that collects the questions through email text message voice recordings etc Through beautifully designed posters digital marketing and other forms of communication people in Cambridge will be encouraged to think about domestic violence issues harder and ask questions Over 18 organizations including the MIT Center for Civic Media are involved in pushing this question campaign Questions already submitted include Does domestic violence affect elders Is it true that 1 in 7 men experience an abusive relationship in their life What is the process for reporting domestic violence After questions are collected for the following 365 days the City of Cambridge along with other community partners working to fight domestic violence will code the submissions by themes and those themes will inform action plans around the questions I am still brainstorming a final deliverable for this course as I get involved in the project but ultimately I will learn to use vojo and help curate the content as the final questions trickle into vojo Two years ago I was enrolled in Ceasar s course Public Participation in the Digital Age and it was then when I first learned about the question campaign concept At that time the question campaign

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta/final-project-revisited-21-days-cambridge (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Theory of Social Change | MIT Center for Civic Media
    the individual takes this concern or idea to a local politician and engages others in the community around the issue encouraging them to also reach out to local politicians Together all stakeholders form a strategy and take action The second diagram assumes a more oppressive sociopolitical environment with a great deal of social stratification and hierarchies of power In that model inspired by Marxist theory we show how the most oppressed portion of society share ideas for change first among themselves and eventually band together to form a movement They communicate their message through several formats depending on the cultural context and collect more support through the social pyramid for their causes If the top of the social pyramid does not listen to the voices and requests of the movement then the group may have to resort to more extreme strategies such as boycotts protests civil disobedience or violence As I reflect on these two models I think what is MOST important to spur social change is the power of the narrative Change starts with a story because it is stories that allow people to connect empathize relate and understand why change is needed The first step to social change is to identify compelling stories humanizing the cause and the second step is to use those stories to bring people together to form a movement Then the movement must blast those stories through whatever platforms are accessible and most influential As mentioned above this is of course dependent on cultural context In class we focus more on technological and Internet platforms but depending on the place print media could also be important However social mobilization and movements are a lot of work and require a lot of strength and momentum to actually achieve the intended goals Thus movements are not

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/aditi-mehta/theory-of-social-change (2016-04-29)
    Open archived version from archive



  •