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  • kanarinka | MIT Center for Civic Media
    Olujimi Here s a brief excerpt about his project which is installed in the Bakalar Gallery until Feb 23rd Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about The Civic Art Initiative presents Kambui Olujimi kanarinka s blog News as Exploration Discovery and Serendipity Submitted by kanarinka on February 3 2014 5 14pm Last year in Ethan Zuckerman s class Future of News and Participatory Media we read a provocative article by the Swiss novelist Rolf Dobelli entitled News is bad for you and giving up reading it will make you happier In the article he lays out some fairly compelling reasons for not reading the news It makes us passive and angry kills our creativity moves too quickly to be meaningful and produces skewed senses of risk and danger For Dobelli news stories are bright coloured candies for the mind diversionary at best and toxic at worst In her response to the article journalist Madeline Bunting makes a case for the conventional wisdom of the civic function of news At its root there is a responsibility to know and understand the world and age you live in That is at the root of democracy that we all have a responsibility to make decisions about how our society is ordered How is democracy possible if people don t want to know Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about News as Exploration Discovery and Serendipity kanarinka s blog Terra Incognita Seeking Journalists and Civic Actors to Pilot our News Game Submitted by kanarinka on January 22 2014 11 58am Calling all journalists news innovators and civic actors Terra Incognita is a news geography game and news recommendation system Help us test Terra Incognita in its alpha stages At the Center for Civic Media we are conducting research

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/kanarinka?page=5 (2016-04-29)
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  • kanarinka | MIT Center for Civic Media
    discussed by mainstream media sources as well as social and participatory media We are interested in where geographically speaking gets more or less attention and how media influences space and place And we are interested in who gets to speak in the complicated new media ecosystem For What we have work like Attention Plotter by Erhardt Graeff part of the Controversy Mapper project that seeks to map how a local news story like the Trayvon Martin case becomes a full blown media firestorm Nathan Matias has been working on Who by analyzing the gender breakdown of internet media and by creating personal media interventions like Follow Bias And as for Where well that s what this blog post is about Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Big Data News and Geography Research Update kanarinka s blog Annette Kim and the Sidewalk Laboratory Submitted by kanarinka on September 19 2013 10 29pm This talk kicks off our Civic Lunch Speaker Series for Fall 2013 Live blogging contributed by Catherine D Ignazio Erhardt Graeff Becky Hurwitz and Rahul Barghava About Annette Kim Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Annette Kim and the Sidewalk Laboratory kanarinka s blog City Science The Office of New Urban Mechanics speaks at MIT Submitted by kanarinka on September 11 2013 2 55pm The Changing Places group runs the City Science lecture series Today they are hosting Nigel Jacob Co Chair Chris Osgood Co Chair and Michael Evans Developer from the Office of New Urban Mechanics for the City of Boston Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about City Science The Office of New Urban Mechanics speaks at MIT kanarinka s blog The Detroit Geographic Expedition and Institute A Case Study in Civic Mapping Submitted by kanarinka

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/kanarinka?page=6 (2016-04-29)
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  • kanarinka | MIT Center for Civic Media
    Ignazio and Luisa Beck Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about How Close to Home Crisis Attention and Geographic Bias kanarinka s blog Counter Cartographies with Lize Mogel Submitted by kanarinka on May 9 2013 2 02pm VizThink by Willow Brugh Artist and designer Lize Mogel came to the Center for Civic Media to discuss Counter cartography a practice that uses maps and mapping to challenge the mainstream narrative of a site or history from a political or activist perspective Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Counter Cartographies with Lize Mogel kanarinka s blog 68 Blocks The Boston Globe s Experiment in Embedded Local Journalism Submitted by kanarinka on May 1 2013 9 58pm The Boston Globe s 68 blocks series is a unique experiment in embedded local journalism In 2012 the Boston Globe undertook a year long effort to understand the Bowdoin Geneva neighborhood of Dorchester For decades journalists had been reporting shootings and homicides there rushing to crime scenes and then leaving to file an article on time The Globe wanted to tell a more complete story of the neighborhood Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about 68 Blocks The Boston Globe s Experiment in Embedded Local Journalism kanarinka s blog Bots for Civic Engagement at SXSW Submitted by kanarinka on March 11 2013 3 50pm From SmarterChild to the Low Orbit Ion Cannon to Horse ebooks humans have relationships of varying quality with bots Mostly it s commercial spam But sometimes it s less benign for instance the 2012 Mexican elections saw thousands of Twitter bots published by one candidate s side denouncing the opposition with a flood of messages There are countless examples of bots used for nefarious purposes in America Iran and elsewhere What would

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/kanarinka?page=7 (2016-04-29)
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  • kanarinka | MIT Center for Civic Media
    news story At the Center we think that media attention matters in both quantity and quality This geodata provided a perfect entry to studying how media attention from the Boston Globe plays out spatially across Boston neighborhoods and Massachusetts towns And with access to the text of the articles associated with different places we could start to answer some questions about not just the amount of media attention a place receives but how that attention is framed Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Mapping the Globe Initial Research into Regional Media Attention in Massachusetts kanarinka s blog Erase the Border A Petition of Voices for Change Submitted by kanarinka on December 18 2012 11 34am Erase the Border is a project that took place on the US Mexico border in May 2012 and continues on the Internet In May 2012 O odham activist artist Ofelia Rivas and I worked with a group of Tohono O odham youth from the village of Ali Jegk to create a symbolic action to erase the US Mexico border fence on the O odham s land Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Erase the Border A Petition of Voices for Change kanarinka s blog Cities and Big Data Opening panel of the Urban Code Conference at MIT Submitted by kanarinka on November 15 2012 10 03pm Carlo Ratti Director of the Senseable City Lab introduces the conference This is the annual Senseable Cities conference run in partnership with the Economist magazine During the Urban Code conference panelists and attendees will address how big urban data is impacting cities urban systems and urban communities You can monitor the twitter conversation at urbancode Tonight s opening panel On Topic there will be five speakers Each will do a 5

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/kanarinka?page=8 (2016-04-29)
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  • kanarinka | MIT Center for Civic Media
    hackathon at the MIT Media Lab called The Make the Breast Pump Not Suck Hackathon Her art and design projects have won awards from the Tanne Foundation Turbulence org the LEF Foundation and Dream It Code It Win It In 2009 she was a finalist for the Foster Prize at the ICA Boston Her work has been exhibited at the Eyebeam Center for Art Technology Museo d Antiochia of Medellin and the Venice Biennial Professor D Ignazio is a Fellow at the Emerson Engagement Lab and a Research Affiliate at and alumna of the MIT Center for Civic Media kanarinka com Recent blog posts by kanarinka Extreme Data Extreme Story Liveblog from the 2012 MIT Knight Civic Media Conference Submitted by kanarinka on June 18 2012 1 16pm The Extreme Data and Storytelling plenary session showcases people who are out on the frontiers of storytelling and who are analyzing and presenting data to make sense of large scale complex human issues They include a scientist using data to unpack the mysteries of economic development a cartographer working to make poetic public visualizations of place and a storyteller who s going to amazing lengths to tell the story of human migration

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/users/kanarinka?page=10 (2016-04-29)
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  • REWIRE: Digital Cosmopolitanism book lauch (liveblog) | MIT Center for Civic Media
    these days are trans national trans border threats You can look at the spread of SARS at the threat of terrorists if you want to live with a high level of connection one way to pay attention is to look at what we fear I would argue that we have many more exciting positive things coming out of interconnection than threats The danger is this we tend to get goods from around the world people from around the world but we don t get information from around the world We re very good at sharing atoms moving people but less good at moving bits across borders Which is crazy There s no difference in a real sense between me loading the New York Times and the Times of India but the data shows that I m not going to load the Times of India Humans flock the tendency is called homophily well documented in social sciences For example there are studies of how a student sits in computer labs and they will tend to sit down with people who look like them long hair glasses etc Somewhere we have a talent for finding people with the same socioeconomic background racial background etc We re very good at finding our flock This was probably advantageous for us for a long times but now this tendency to flock may be keeping us from finding the information that we need to get My fear is that the tools we re building for the Internet aren t taking this very seriously I think we ve been building tools to solve our basic desires Search is such a tool it tries to give you exactly what you ask for without challenging you My argument is that this may actually be dangerous We may need to encounter a certain amount of cognitive diversity to get the information we need in the world And we re going even further with social search we find not just what we want but what our friends want It s kinda creepy that you can do a Facebook search for the bars that are liked by your female friends I m not sure I want my friends to pre filter for me If you re subject to homophily the danger is that tools for social search may drive us into the same circles and the same content over and over again Ronald Burt wrote a paper Structural Holes and Good Ideas several years ago He got himself hired as a VP at Raytheon and was able to experiment on Raytheon employees The experiment he did was solicited the people in the purchasing department and asked each person how they could make the company better and gave these to the executives He correlated the results of the executives selection with the social graph He found that the people who were bridges between different networks e g in charge with purchasing in Cleveland but regularly talking to Cincinnati you were better placed to find good ideas Most of us don t sit in a blank room and think wonderful thoughts through the platonic essence of our minds Most of us are thieves we find inspiration in different circles and pull them together The way Picasso developed cubism was in part through looking at masks from Benin He collected African masks until his death I m really interested in how we can use the Internet not to isolate ourselves but how to take advantage of the incredible cognitive diversity from people who have access all around the world I don t want to just argue about this I want to think about how we build these tools Right now we have a problem a new technology like Google Glass comes around and we have to figure out how we re going to react to it There s an alternative to this we could have a conversation and ask Do we really want this A great deal of the time when we talk about whether the Internet makes us stupid or fat or bald we re not actually talking about the fact that this is a technology most people didn t encounter 20 years ago This is something that people in this room are building If we re worried that the Internet isn t giving us a diverse view of the world we can go after that problem Global Voices is a project I developed at the Berkman Center to try to figure out what other people in the world were saying It s now a 9 year old project with over 1200 people It s been a success to a point it s a healthy community but you probably don t read it and honestly I don t read it everyday either We have to think about how we come across information That s a Fitbit I carry one A lot of people are now thinking about how you track your own behavior I know I don t read Global Voices much because I track the media I consume We ve gotten better at tracking our bodies than tracking our minds I d like to do cognitive tracking to see what we re actually doing I know that left on my own I d spend all my time reading cute cat macros on reddit Over at the Center for Civic Media Nathan Matias one of my students and Sarah Szalavitz have developed a tool called FollowBias You enter in your Twitter handle and it tries to calculate the gender of the people you follow It turns out that I follow about 1100 people on Twitter and they re mostly men This is slightly embarrassing But it s something I wouldn t be able to find out without a tool Then when I go on Twitter I ask myself Do I need to follow another white male like Dan Novy novysan Until we have tools that let us interrogate the media that we re looking at we won t question our behavior Another example is Catherine D Ignazio s Mapping the Globe which shows what locations around Boston appear in the Boston Globe It shows how the news can be biased by geography If we want to go after this problem we need to build tools to help us understand our habits We see the world through the lens of media and have to start to think critically about what s coming to us We re starting to think about proactive tools like The Weekly Different which looks at how you follow people on Twitter and suggests people to follow who are different from you Maybe you don t want to follow polar opposites homophobic christian preachers from Uganda but maybe we can move people 5 or 10 degrees That s the basic idea of the book I d like to welcome David Weinberger Judith Donath and Ann Marie Lipinski the respondents We ll begin with Judith Donath faculty fellow from the Berkman Center Judith Thank you Ethan that was wonderful Only one point that I want to argue with what you started with when you said that it was an imposition to read this book Books are a gift they provoke you to think about things you haven t thought about before This book is far more like a gift than an imposition Part of it was the stories it s full of anecdotes and Ethan is an amazing story teller He makes a deep complicated and nuanced argument So many books are not diverse and Ethan s thinking is internally diverse Part of the complexity is that he is a writer who will say but a lot going back and forth with ideas a mind arguing with itself through extraordinarily entertaining ideas When I was reading I tended to argue with it a lot in my head Part of it is the initial question Why do we want this type of diversity What is the value of it From being in the book club with Ethan there are ideas that went in different directions One of those was this We are living in a complicated time I have a 12 year old who asked In the 60 s everyone wore micro mini skirts But what characterizes our time now The characteristic of now is complexity With the types of change we re living through changes in technology and social networks we need to ask ourselves what do we want to be building Twitter and Facebook aren t necessarily the be all end all 150 years ago people needed very strong ties people you spend a lot of time with who you know through multiple routes in order to take care of our basic needs But today that s different The Little House in the Big Woods is a story about growing up in pioneer America and shows the high degree of self sufficiency you needed Today we live in an era when all of those things have been outsourced to markets we don t need strong ties A world with more weak ties allows ties to be more diverse Relying on a small set of close friends and family doesn t leave room for as broad a diversity If you look at the ties you see online they re extremely weak The Facebook Friend is someone you may have met once at a conference and never seen again but now you can remain connected and see who their kids are People who go off to college remain connected to people they knew in first grade This is at a time when our need for connection is smaller than it s been in history even personal care e g babysitters don t require strong ties If you move into a neighborhood you don t need to meet reliable teenagers you can find that info online We increasingly find commercial or online connections for every need The things that forced you to get out and make friends are disappearing from our world Our ties with other people are increasingly volitional These questions around global connectivity that Ethan is raising aren t just questions of being global It s the question of how do we pay attention to others at any scale The other question I d debated while reading this book is Beyond globalism what other types of diversity are you exposed to Do you boost diversity in Twitter by following more women if 75 of them are wine drinking mommy bloggers Developing the tools that help you find another person and care about them enough that you can develop a relationship that ties you over in a longer span I had two friends who came out with books this spring the first is Rewire Ethan the other called The Bling Ring by Nancy Jo Sales It s about teenagers who became so obsessed by celebrities that they d break into their houses stealing things to feel like they were part of their lives They really deeply cared about these celebrities My question is how do we really understand each other in our era of meeting people through online stories How do we make the connections that let us see people as individuals and want to make further connections Ethan Thanks I m going to be thinking about this for a couple of weeks One place where I feel like you re spot on is this idea that as we move to markets to meet our needs we need fewer strong ties I think it s worth asking what sort of ties do we need now As long as you ve got a network of very weak ties you can get recommendations and navigate the world The case that I m trying to make beyond just Gratovetter Strength of Weak Ties is the idea of the bridge tie The bridge tie ties you into a different part of your social network I think what s really important is that we re becoming dependent on sets of people we don t know and don t understand Maybe we re fine with that but maybe not Bridge ties suggest the possibility that we could find people who can push us in a different direction Judith Ties have strength because they are diverse not weak One of the great things social media can do is find the multiplexity that helps us discover that the person we thought we knew slightly has much more in common with you Ann Marie I want to start where Ethan s book begins with the dedication to his son I begin with my daughter a teenager Not long ago I saw her working on her laptop and saw a striking photograph it s of a volleyball game between Mexico and US citizens from 1979 The game was unusual in that the Mexicans were in Naco Mexico and the Americans in Naco Arizona The volleyball game is over a rusted border fence that divides the countries I came back to this as a visual metaphor for the promise and barriers in the age of connection Hard wired for humanity and curiosity and recently equipped the technology we still face border fences in our daily interactions My reactions are formed as a near lifelong journalist trying to overcome the flock tendencies Ethan articulates are these first language and culture can be alienating without bridge bloggers or bridge builders to guide us The Arab Spring was an exception and the chances we will encounter moments like that are meaningfully fewer with a diminished journalistic core I dislike sports metaphors but allow me one Ideas by the multitude are spiked over the net every moment Not all of these ideas find their way into play Think of your own experience with publishing authors are often surprised by their successes We don t know what connects we guess at what connects Time is finite In searching to recover the Naco volleyball game photo this week I discovered a whole world of stories of immigration reform the battle of the Mexican Revolution drug cartels and the construction of metal walls along sections of the border which may have signalled the end of the volleyball game I say may because I did not have time between local community service and family needs to research it Empathy is elastic I wish we were all the better angels he seeks in the world It s possible that our current technological capacity to connect outpaces our capacity for empathy Danielle Allen s book Talking to Strangers reminds us of the advice we all give to children don t talk to strangers Danielle argues that we should substitute it with The Citizenship of Political Friendship I think Ethan and Danielle are affectionately calling for something similar As the one so called mainstream media representative here let me add When I left the Chicago Tribune about a year ago we had a dozen foreign bureaus today there are none Fewer dedicated correspondents doesn t necessarily mean less coverage in newspapers but I think the evidence to the contrary is abundant If Ethan is right and I think he is about homophily literally love of same and our tendency is to reach out for people like ourselves then the call for us to speak to others comes at a particularly important time When I think of my daughter looking at her photograph of the volleyball game while sitting in Hyde Park two blocks from the Obama household and 7 blocks from the poorest neighborhood in Chicago the divide this represents between knowledge and empathy is huge The Internet s ability to create our own Daily Me is in stark contrast to the newspapers traditional role in creating the Daily We Ethan Thank you for putting empathy on the table This book took me a long time to write and 7 8 years of picking fights with people The first 2 or 3 years was picking fights with journalists because I assumed it was their fault trying to cover what was easier or what audiences wanted One of the things that s become clear is realizing the extent to which journalism is about engineering empathy I talk about engineering serendipity in the book but empathy is stumbling upon the emotion for someone you wouldn t otherwise be connected to Ann Marie I sat in a focus group at the newspaper when a gentleman described in the late 90 s the crisis with the Thai Baht and he was made to understand why that mattered to him due to 401Ks and currency markets It was interesting that the iPad kept correcting Baht to Bat It wasn t just accidental that he discovered that it s not just pure empathy it includes self interest but it takes somebody to make that connection to your own interests David You re being ridiculous about the imposition We get to spend 10 15 hours with you in the book The only thing better than that is spending 10 years with you as I have I have learned more from you than from anyone else Thank you It s a wonderful book A book from Ethan s head and his heart Let me give you one example You talk about how we re better at moving atoms around the world than bits The first chapter is a wonderful eye opening chapter Ethan takes us through the story of Fiji water and how we re better at moving water around the world than the information about what s going on in Fiji I m not going to take a poll but I m certain that most of us have drunk more Fiji water than we ve drunk Fiji bits It s a wonderful way of making the point Your ability to question yourself and think more than one thought at a time is great Ethan makes a number of assumptions first is that technology

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/cfd/rewire-digital-cosmopolitanism-book-lauch-liveblog (2016-04-29)
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  • cfd's blog | MIT Center for Civic Media
    which left our main kitchen without any hot water One of the residents a well meaning competent and all around good person took on the task of fixing this and called up a plumber for an emergency job The plumber charged us the emergency rate almost 2000 to install a new water heater very similar to this model here which rings in at 358 at Home Depot Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Why InterTwinkles Leadership in horizontal movements Submitted by cfd on February 8 2013 5 42pm In an insightful essay at the New Republic Evgeny Morozov raises a powerful critique of what he describes as Internet centrism in Steven Johnson s 2012 book Future Perfect Morozov identifies in Johnson s book a strain of popular rhetoric which holds that the Internet is a model of decentralization horizontalism and leaderlessness and that the world would be improved by applying these features to other domains While most of the essay is spot on I d like to complicate and dig a little more into the role of leadership in horizontal decision making and organizing within activist movements one of the subjects of Morozov s critique Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Leadership in horizontal movements Charts from the floor of the US Senate Submitted by cfd on November 19 2012 11 24am The recent fun tumblr Charts from the floor of the US Senate and Orrin Hatch s gem brought this story to mind One of the formative moments of my youth came from a town hall meeting with Hatch s colleague senator Bob Bennett on the topic of wilderness protection of federal land in Utah I had come to the meeting with a petition of around 1000 signatures that I had gathered at my high school supporting wilderness which he derisively dismissed as a push poll and said things to the effect that I m elected to do what I want not what the polls say He then brought out a floor chart with two images of the Escalante River in Utah one from the mid 70 s and one from the mid 90 s The older picture was barren of vegetation the recent picture was lush and green and he asserted This is what 20 years of non wilderness management can do We don t need wilderness Google Plus One Tweet Widget Facebook Like Read more about Charts from the floor of the US Senate Occupy Streams Map Submitted by cfd on November 16 2011 3 42pm With the growth of the 99 Percent movement and occupations all over the world a large number of citizen journalists and activists have turned to real time video casting services such as livestream ustream and justin tv Live streaming offers a compelling way to experience a protest on the ground as it s happening and it has even trickled up to more traditional media services Time com published the live feed from The

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/cfd (2016-04-29)
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  • In response: Hackathons don't solve big problems | MIT Center for Civic Media
    participating in our most recent video Hackathons Tech s Answer to Big Problems Also thanks to Charlie for giving us the opportunity to respond to his comments and ideas The goal of our video was to shine a light on this phenomenon Hackathons have transcended the world of technology and are being employed for everything from voter rights to disaster relief They provide a methodology for addressing problems that may seem insurmountable to everyday citizens Where existing systems fail hackathons can create a new path toward a successful outcome With that said we agree that hackathons are not a quick fix Technology doesn t solve real world problems people do In the full transcript of Charlie s interview as in his blog post he rightly points to the amazing work Occupy Sandy has done for hurricane victims on the ground mobilizing quickly and circumventing red tape to get aid to people who need it We understand that Hurricane Hackers was not involved in aid work but we also acknowledge that the open nature of the data allowed the group to take part in the post disaster response in ways that would have been impossible in the past And as any

    Original URL path: https://civic.mit.edu/blog/cfd/in-response-hackathons-dont-solve-big-problems (2016-04-29)
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