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  • Did You Give Him a Lift?
    was slipping down hill And the world so I fancied was using him ill Did you give him a word Did you show him the road Or did you just let him go on with his load Do you know what it means to be losing the fight When a lift just in time might set everything right Do you know what it means just a clasp of a hand

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/wrose/LIFT.HTM (2016-01-26)
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  • The Builder
    shall never know decay Great is thy skill O Builder Thy fame shall endure for aye A teacher builded a temple With loving and infinite care Planning each arch with patience Laying each stone with prayer None praised her unceasing efforts None knew of her wondrous plan For the temple the teacher builded Was unseen by the eyes of man Gone is the builder s temple Crumbled into the dust

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  • Thomas Jefferson
    than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience Oscar Wilde Bloom where you are planted Unknown Most wounds are self inflicted Winfield H Rose Never underestimate the power of the dark side Darth Vader War is an ugly thing but not the ugliest of things The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight nothing which is more important than his own personal safety is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself John Stuart Mill Watch your thoughts they become words Watch your words they become actions Watch your actions they become habits Watch your habits they become character Watch your character it becomes your destiny Frank Outlaw From the wild Irish slums of the 19th century Eastern seaboard to the riot torn suburbs of Los Angeles there is one unmistakable lesson in American history a community that allows a large number of young men to grow up in broken families dominated by women never acquiring any stable relationship to male authority never acquiring any set of rational expectations about the future that community asks for and gets chaos Crime violence unrest unrestrained lashing out at the whole social structure that is not only expected it is very near to inevitable Daniel Patrick Moynihan A society that loses its sense of outrage is doomed to extinction Edwin Torres Judge New York State Supreme Court Twelfth Judicial District Decisions not conditions determine what a man is Viktor Frankl Austrian psychiatrist and philosopher for the individual long run personal satisfaction is to be found only in morally correct behavior this truth is one that the intelligence and traditions of our Western society have long taught John D Millet History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or timid Dwight D Eisenhower Duty is the sublimest word in our language Do your duty in all things You cannot do more You should never wish to do less Robert E Lee The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug Mark Twain The society that loses its grip on the past is in danger for it produces men who know nothing but the present and who are not aware that life has been and could be different from what it is Such men bear tyranny easily for they have nothing with which to compare it Trevor J Saunders To know nothing of the world before you were born is to remain a child Cicero I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence Two roads diverged in a wood and I I took the one less traveled by and that has made all the difference Robert Frost If you would not be forgotten as soon as

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  • Knowing History
    German engineer named John Fritz and after working for months to get this machinery finished he came into the plant one morning and he said Alright boys let s start her up and see why she doesn t work That s very American We will find out what s not working right and we will fix it and then maybe it will work right That s been our star that s what we ve guided on I have just returned from a cruise through the Panama Canal I think often about why the French failed at Panama and why we succeeded One of the reasons we succeeded is that we were gifted we were attuned to adaptation to doing what works whereas they were trained to do everything in a certain way We have a gift for improvisation We improvise in jazz we improvise in much of our architectural breakthroughs Improvisation is one of our traits as a nation as a people because it was essential it was necessary because we were doing again and again and again what hadn t been done before Keep in mind that when we were founded by those people in the late 18th century none of them had had any prior experience in either revolutions or nation making They were as we would say winging it And they were idealistic and they were young We see their faces in the old paintings done later in their lives or looking at us from the money in our wallets and we see the awkward teeth and the powdered hair and we think of them as elder statesmen But George Washington when he took command of the continental army at Cambridge in 1775 was 43 years old and he was the oldest of them Jefferson was 33 when he wrote the Declaration of Independence John Adams was 40 Benjamin Rush one of the most interesting of them all and one of the founders of the antislavery movement in Philadelphia was 30 years old when he signed the Declaration They were young people They were feeling their way improvising trying to do what would work They had no money no navy no real army There wasn t a bank in the entire country There wasn t but one bridge between New York and Boston It was a little country of 2 500 000 people 500 000 of whom were held in slavery a little fringe of settlement along the east coast What a story What a noble beginning And think of this almost no nations in the world know when they were born We know exactly when we began and why we began and who did it In the rotunda of the Capitol in Washington hangs John Trumbull s great painting The Declaration of Independence Fourth of July 1776 It s been seen by more people than any other American painting It s our best known scene from our past And almost nothing about it is accurate The Declaration of Independence wasn t signed on July 4th They didn t start to sign the Declaration until August 2nd and only a part of the Congress was then present They kept coming back in the months that followed from their distant states to take their turn signing the document The chairs are wrong the doors are in the wrong place there were no heavy draperies at the windows and the display of military flags and banners on the back wall is strictly a figment of Trumbull s imagination But what is accurate about it are the faces Every single one of the 47 men in that painting is an identifiable and thus accountable individual We know what they look like We know who they were And that s what Trumbull wanted He wanted us to know them and by God not to forget them Because this momentous step wasn t a paper being handed down by a potentate or a king or a czar it was the decision of a Congress acting freely Our Failure Our Duty We are raising a generation of young Americans who are by and large historically illiterate And it s not their fault There have been innumerable studies and there s no denying it I ve experienced it myself again and again I had a young woman come up to me after a talk one morning at the University of Missouri to tell me that she was glad she came to hear me speak and I said I was pleased she had shown up She said Yes I m very pleased because until now I never understood that all of the 13 colonies the original 13 colonies were on the east coast Now you hear that and you think What in the world have we done How could this young lady this wonderful young American become a student at a fine university and not know that I taught a seminar at Dartmouth of seniors majoring in history honor students 25 of them The first morning we sat down and I said How many of you know who George Marshall was Not one There was a long silence and finally one young man asked Did he have maybe something to do with the Marshall Plan And I said yes he certainly did and that s a good place to begin talking about George Marshall We have to do several things First of all we have to get across the idea that we have to know who we were if we re to know who we are and where we re headed This is essential We have to value what our forebears and not just in the 18th century but our own parents and grandparents did for us or we re not going to take it very seriously and it can slip away If you don t care about it if you ve inherited some great work of art that is worth a fortune and you don t know that it s worth a fortune you don t even know that it s a great work of art and you re not interested in it you re going to lose it We have to do a far better job of teaching our teachers We have too many teachers who are graduating with degrees in education They go to schools of education or they major in education and they graduate knowing something called education but they don t know a subject They re assigned to teach botany or English literature or history and of course they can t perform as they should Knowing a subject is important because you want to know what you re talking about when you re teaching But beyond that you can t love what you don t know And the great teachers the teachers who influence you who change your lives almost always I m sure are the teachers that love what they are teaching It is that wonderful teacher who says Come over here and look in this microscope you re really going to get a kick out of this There was a wonderful professor of child psychology at the University of Pittsburgh named Margaret McFarland who was so wise that I wish her teachings and her ideas and her themes were much better known She said that attitudes aren t taught they re caught If the teacher has an attitude of enthusiasm for the subject the student catches that whether the student is in second grade or is in graduate school She said that if you show them what you love they ll get it and they ll want to get it Also if the teachers know what they are teaching they are much less dependent on textbooks And I don t know when the last time you picked up a textbook in American history might have been And there are to be sure some very good ones still in print But most of them it appears to me have been published in order to kill any interest that anyone might have in history I think that students would be better served by cutting out all the pages clipping up all the page numbers mixing them all up and then asking students to put the pages back together in the right order The textbooks are dreary they re done by committee they re often hilariously politically correct and they re not doing any good Students should not have to read anything that we you and I wouldn t want to read ourselves And there are wonderful books past and present There is literature in history Let s begin with Longfellow for example Let s begin with Lincoln s Second Inaugural Address for example These are literature They can read that too History isn t just something that ought to be taught or ought to be read or ought to be encouraged because it s going to make us a better citizen It will make us a better citizen or because it will make us a more thoughtful and understanding human being which it will or because it will cause us to behave better which it will It should be taught for pleasure The pleasure of history like art or music or literature consists of an expansion of the experience of being alive which is what education is largely about And we need not leave the whole job of teaching history to the teachers If I could have you come away from what I have to say tonight remembering one thing it would be this The teaching of history the emphasis on the importance of history the enjoyment of history should begin at home We who are parents or grandparents should be taking our children to historic sights We should be talking about those books in biography or history that we have particularly enjoyed or that character or those characters in history that have meant something to us We should be talking about what it was like when we were growing up in the olden days Children particularly little children love this And in my view the real focus should be at the grade school level We all know that those little guys can learn languages so fast it takes your breath away They can learn anything so fast it takes your breath away And the other very important truth is that they want to learn They can be taught to dissect a cow s eye They can be taught anything And there s no secret to teaching history or to making history interesting Barbara Tuchman said it in two words Tell stories That s what history is a story And what s a story E M Forster gave a wonderful definition to it If I say to you the king died and then the queen died that s a sequence of events If I say the king died and the queen died of grief that s a story That s human That calls for empathy on the part of the teller of the story and of the reader or listener to the story And we ought to be growing encouraging developing historians who have heart and empathy to put students in that place of those people before us who were just as human just as real and maybe in some ways more real than we are We ve got to teach history and nurture history and encourage history because it s an antidote to the hubris of the present the idea that everything we have and everything we do and everything we think is the ultimate the best Going through the Panama Canal I couldn t help but think about all that I had read in my research on that story of what they endured to build that great path how much they had to know and to learn how many different kinds of talent it took to achieve that success and what the Americans did under John Stevens and George Goethals in the face of unexpected breakdowns landslides and floods They built a canal that cost less than it was expected to cost was finished before it was expected to be finished and is still running today exactly the same as it was in 1914 when it opened They didn t by present day standards for example understand the chemistry of making concrete But when we go and drill into those concrete locks now we find the deterioration is practically nil and we don t know how they did it That ingenious contrivance by the American engineers is a perfect expression of what engineering ought to be at its best man s creations working with nature The giant gates work because they re floating they re hollow like airplane wings The electric motors that open and close the gates use power which is generated by the spillway from the dam that creates the lake that bridges the isthmus It s an extraordinary work of civilization And we couldn t do it any better today and in some ways we probably wouldn t do it as well If you were to take a look for example at what s happened with the Big Dig in Boston you realize that we maybe aren t closer to the angels by any means nearly a hundred years later We should never look down on those people and say that they should have known better What do you think they re going to be saying about us in the future They re going to be saying we should have known better Why did we do that What were we thinking of All this second guessing and the arrogance of it are unfortunate Listening To The Past Samuel Eliot Morison said we ought to read history because it will help us to behave better It does And we ought to read history because it helps to break down the dividers between the disciplines of science medicine philosophy art music whatever It s all part of the human story and ought to be seen as such You can t understand it unless you see it that way You can t understand the 18th century for example unless you understand the vocabulary of the 18th century What did they mean by those words They didn t necessarily mean the same thing as we do There s a line in one of the letters written by John Adams where he s telling his wife Abigail at home We can t guarantee success in this war but we can do something better We can deserve it Think how different that is from the attitude today when all that matters is success being number one getting ahead getting to the top However you betray or gouge or claw or do whatever awful thing is immaterial if you get to the top That line in the Adams letter is saying that how the war turns out is in the hands of God We can t control that but we can control how we behave We can deserve success When I read that line when I was doing the research on the book it practically lifted me out of my chair And then about three weeks later I was reading some correspondence written by George Washington and there was the same line I thought wait a minute what s going on And I thought they re quoting something So as we all often do I got down good old Bartlett s Familiar Quotations and I started going through the entries from the 18th century and bingo there it was It s a line from the play Cato They were quoting something that was in the language of the time They were quoting scripture of a kind a kind of secular creed if you will And you can t understand why they behaved as they did if you don t understand that You can t understand why honor was so important to them and why they were truly ready to put their lives their fortunes their sacred honor on the line Those weren t just words I want to read to you in conclusion a letter that John Quincy Adams received from his mother Little John Adams was taken to Europe by his father when his father sailed out of Massachusetts in the midst of winter in the midst of war to serve our country in France Nobody went to sea in the wintertime on the North Atlantic if it could possibly be avoided And nobody did it trying to cut through the British barricade outside of Boston Harbor because the British ships were sitting out there waiting to capture somebody like John Adams and take him to London and to the Tower where he would have been hanged as a traitor But they sent this little ten year old boy with his father risking his life his mother knowing that she wouldn t see him for months maybe years at best Why Because she and his father wanted John Quincy to be in association with Franklin and the great political philosophers of France to learn to speak French to travel in Europe to be able to soak it all up And they risked his life for that for his education We have no idea what people were willing to do for education in times past It s the one sustaining theme through our whole country that the next generation will be better educated than we are John Adams himself is a living example of the transforming miracle of education His father was able to write his name we know His mother was almost certainly illiterate And because he had a scholarship to Harvard everything changed for him He said I discovered books and read forever and he did And they wanted this for their son Well it was a horrendous voyage Everything

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  • American National Government
    information whereas fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information Multiple Submission The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work including oral reports for credit more than once without authorization from the instructor Plagiarism Intentionally or knowingly representing the words ideas creative work or data of someone else as one s own in any academic exercise without due and proper acknowledgement Instructors should outline their expectations that may go beyond the scope of this policy at the beginning of each course and identify such expectations and restrictions in the course syllabus When an instructor receives evidence either directly or indirectly of academic dishonesty he or she should investigate the instance The faculty member should then take appropriate disciplinary action Disciplinary action may include but is not limited to the following 1 Requiring the student s to repeat the exercise or do additional related exercise s 2 Lowering the grade or failing the student s on the particular exercise s involved 3 Lowering the grade or failing the student s in the course If the disciplinary action results in the awarding of a grade of E in the course the student s may not drop the course Faculty reserve the right to invalidate any exercise or other evaluative measures if substantial evidence exists that the integrity of the exercise has been compromised Faculty also reserve the right to document in the course syllabi further academic honesty policy elements related to the individual disciplines A student may appeal the decision of the faculty member with the department chair in writing within five working days Note If at any point in this process the student alleges that actions have taken place that may be in violation of the Murray State University Non Discrimination Statement this process must be suspended and the matter be directed to the Office of Equal Opportunity Any appeal will be forwarded to the appropriate university committee as determined by the Provost XIII Students with Disabilities The Office of Student Disability Services OSDS is designed to coordinate and administer services and accommodations for students with documented disabilities In doing so OSDS will review disability documentation meet with students to determine appropriate reasonable accommodations and work with other areas on campus to implement services Their goal is to provide individuals with disabilities access to programs services and activities at Murray State University Contact information Velvet Wilson Director 423 Wells Hall Murray State University Murray KY 42071 270 809 5737 velvet wilson murraystate edu XIV Equal Opportunity Murray State University endorses the intent of all federal and state laws created to prohibit discrimination Murray State University does not discriminate on the basis of race color national origin gender sexual orientation religion age veteran status or disability in employment admissions or the provision of services and provides upon request reasonable accommodation including auxiliary aids and services necessary to afford individuals with disabilities equal access to participate in all programs and activities For more information contact the Office of Diversity Equity and Access 103 Wells Hall 270 809 3155 voice 270 809 3361 TDD or email eduffy murraystate edu XV Political Science Internet Resources There is a great amount of information available on the WorldWideWeb and I urge you to spend some time surfing the internet for political and historical information on the United States If you are not familiar with this process go to the title page of my homepage and click on the links there Yahoo is an excellent search engine on politics and public affairs Political Documents contains documents such as the Declaration of Independence Jurist contains much timely information and Findlaw is an excellent source of court opinions and other legal materials The Federal Web Locator ROLL CALL PoliSci com and the Federal Internet Guide are excellent guides to the federal government on the net Virtually every federal agency has its own website for example see the Internal Revenue Service and the FBI XVI Newspapers and Television American National Government is a political science course that is very timely and relevant Politics happens all the time and is reported in the media constantly Illustrations of principles and ideas discussed in your text and in class will occur almost every day It is imperative for the good student and the good citizen to keep up with these developments by reading newspapers magazines and watching television news You should read at least one good newspaper a day better yet would be one national paper such as USA Today or the Wall Street Journal and a local paper One of the best features of newspapers is op ed columns written by syndicated political analysts such as George Will John David Dyche Juan Williams Charles Krauthammer Thomas Sowell and others these are usually found on the editorial page and provide excellent analysis and interpretation of the news as well as news itself They are online as well and the first page of the website of the Jewish World Review contains a long list of such columnists They also may be used for extra credit submissions The Fox News Channel is in my view the best source of news on television We report you decide and the Bret Baier newshour from 5 00 to 6 00 p m CT is the best single news program on television i C Span I and II provide continuous coverage of Congress CNN HLN CNBC MSNBC and BLAZE are others To be an intelligent voter in particular and a good citizen in general your learning must be a continuous diligent and life long process COURSE OUTLINE I Introduction Jillson ch 1 the Mayflower Compact and the Declaration of Independence A Goals for the course Why study American government Our socio political context today Bob Lonsberry Two Americas U S Debt Clock Active Shooter Training Global Terrorism Index Thucydides We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs not as harmless but a useless character B What is government Some basic definitions C What is government for How much should government do Madison If men were angels no government would be necessary Aristotle the main concern of politics is to engender a certain character in the citizens and to make them good and disposed to perform noble actions Gladstone It is the duty of the government to make it easy for the people to do right and difficult for the people to do wrong D Political and Economic Options Winfield H Rose On the Nature of Good Citizenship in a Democratic Society on Internet access via my homepage E Rose The Theological Philosophical and Historical Foundations of the American Polity Purchase at Copy Express F Jefferson Franklin and Adams The Declaration of Independence G Winfield H Rose These Truths To Be Self Evident What Does the Declaration of Independence Mean Today II The Formal Institutional Setting Chs 2 3 A Articles of Confederation read in Appendix B The Constitution read in Appendix 1 The Founding Fathers and the Constitutional Convention of 1787 2 Plans proposals and compromises 3 Ratification and The Federalist Papers see Appendix read s 10 51 4 Interpretations Beard and McDonald 5 Fundamental Principles and Features a separation of powers and checks and balances b federalism and the types of powers c Amendments 11 27 amendments proposed but not ratified III Inputs Public Opinion and the Mass Media Chs 4 5 A Examine the websites Roper Center for Public Opinion Research The Gallup Organization Harris Poll Online and Public Agenda Online B Definitions and characteristics C Political socialization and its agents D Are you a liberal or a conservative E Propaganda Click on Propaganda Analysis HomePage and study the types and examples of propaganda presented there You will be responsible for this F Mass media and the Madison Avenue approach to politics politicians as soap and toothpaste G The mass media are they out of touch and can they be believed See Media Research Center America s Media Watchdog H The talk radio and talk t v phenomena see the Guide to Talk Radio Programming IV Input Linkage I Political Parties Ch 7 A What is a political party See Directory of U S Political Parties B Party identification in the American electorate C Functions of political parties D Party systems one two and multi Google party platforms E Why a two party system in the United States F Party organization and structure G Party lineage doctrine and dominance H Political parties in the American system an evaluation V Input Linkage II The Selection of Actors Voting and Elections Ch 8 A Constitutional standards of eligibility B Formal requirements for voting See Campaign Secrets C Party identification and participation in politics D Ballot systems E Expansion of the suffrage F Nominating methods G Campaign strategy techniques and finance federal election laws and the Federal Election Commission H The voting decision I Turnout and voting patterns J Typology of elections K Do elections matter L Go to Kentucky State Board of Elections for the current Kentucky election calendar voter registration statistics by county primary and general election results and a downloadable voter registration card with instructions M Go to the official websites of the national Democratic and Republican parties N So you want to run for office Things to consider VI Input Linkage III Interest Groups and Social Movements Ch 6 A Enter lobbying and interest groups into a search engine and see what you get B What is an interest group Interest group tactics C Differences between interest groups and political parties D What interest groups do and how they do it A Day in the Life of a Lobbyist E FORTUNE s 25 Most Effective Interest Groups Today and related links Social Groupings and Organized Groups First Street 30 Revealed Special Interest Group Links F Evaluation pro s and con s G Social Movements VII The Political System Part I Congress Article I of the Constitution and relevant amendments chapter 9 in text A The origin and powers of Congress B Recruitment what types of people run for Congress C Professionalization and turnover are term limits needed D Current party alignment in the House and Senate See www senate gov and www house gov E Party cohesion and party discipline F Representative roles and duties G The two houses the House and Senate 1 leadership 2 committees their chairmen and seniority 3 major differences H The legislative process including the House Rules Committee the discharge petition the filibuster and the President I Congress in the American system 1 special functions confirmations ratifications investigations impeachments Foreign v domestic policy 2 the powers of the legislative branch compared to those of the executive and judicial branches 3 evaluation Project VoteSmart How to Learn About Your Representatives in Congress VIII The Political System Part II The Presidency Article II relevant amendments and Chapters 10 11 To other good Internet links on the Presidency Federal law pertaining to Presidential elections and controversies Title 3 United States Code Chapter 1 William J Bennett The President is the symbol of who the people of the United States are He is the person who stands for us in the eyes of the world and the eyes of our children A The origin and powers of the Presidency B Recruitment what types of people run for President C Conceptions of executive power is there an undefined residuum See www potus com D Functions and duties E The five types of agencies and departments their duties and functions F The civil service G The powers of the executive branch compared to those of the legislative and judicial branches H Evaluating Presidents and the Presidency IX The Political System Part III The Judiciary Article III relevant amendments Federalist 78 and Chapter 12 See Jurist The Law Professors Network U S Judicial Branch Resources and Judicial Nominations A The origin and powers of the judicial branch B Recruitment what types of people become judges See www supremecourt gov C Basic concepts and definitions D About the Supreme Court E Selected important decisions of the Supreme Court F Contributions of Chief Justice John Marshall G The powers of the judicial branch compared to those of the executive and legislative branches H The Judiciary in the American system activism v restraint The Founding Fathers did not establish the United States as a democratic republic so that elected officials would decide trivia while all great questions would be decided by the judiciary Judge Andrew Kleinfeld United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit 1996 X Civil Liberties and Civil Rights Amendments 1 10 14 Chapter 13 A The Bill of Rights see First Amendment Cyber Tribune and the Second Amendment Foundation B The 14th Amendment and the Incorporation Doctrine C The Bill of Rights interpreted and applied today D Criminal Justice in America E Evaluation XI Public Policy Foreign and Domestic Chapters 14 15 A Promoting the general welfare B Social Security Medicare See www usdebtclock org C Regulating the economy D Taxing and spending the budget and the national debt see Tax Foundation E National security international affairs and the war against terrorism XII Concluding Observations The barbarians are not at the gates They are inside Thomas Sowell The fact that we live well doesn t mean we live nobly David Gergen No person is above the law The high and the low the mighty and the mean all are subject to the rule of law This simple yet majestic truth lies at the very foundation of the American republic Manchester Union Leader December 21 1998 Outside Writing Assignment One of the most important habits an educated and politically aware person can have is reading on a regular basis newspapers in general and especially newspaper columns which analyze contemporary political events and issues Reading or watching the news on television will tell you something about what is taking place but it will not interpret or analyze what is taking place in terms of the larger political landscape That is what nationally syndicated columnists do when they write their weekly or bi weekly columns These columns are sometimes called op ed pieces because they contain opinion and are usually published on the editorial page of a newspaper They also are published in news magazines such as Time Newsweek and others and most if not all are available via the internet The website for Jewish World Review contains an extensive list of such columnists Some are clearly conservative some are clearly liberal and some are middle of the road or moderate You may Google the terms liberal columnists and conservative columnists for further assistance Your outside writing assignment for POL 140 is to write an eight to ten page analytical essay on a current political topic or issue that you identify as one of the five most important today based on at least eight columns written by at least four different columnists You should select columnists who have different viewpoints and perspectives i e conservative right center moderate and liberal left One such topic might be the causes and prevention of gun violence and the role of the Second Amendment Other topics might be NAFTA Obamacare Cap Trade global climate change privacy v national security the Benghazi fiasco the economy the recently negotiated nuclear agreement with Iran or Islamist terrorism Be sure to attach the printed columns to the back of your paper and be sure to indicate when and where they appeared i e give their citation This should be a high quality well written paper Follow my writing guidelines Tips on Good Writing which you may access via my homepage Excessive errors in grammar spelling and punctuation cannot be tolerated Double space and use 12 font on a good printer Citations should follow the directions given in Style Manual for Political Science published by the American Political Science Association under the heading Newspaper Articles This manual is available on line only from the American Political Science Association website Please include a bibliography at the end in which you list all your sources Your due date is April 15 13 IF you turn your paper in on time you will have the opportunity to resubmit your paper after it is returned to you to improve your grade by making the corrections noted Late papers will be accepted until those submitted on time are returned but they will not have the voluntary resubmission option This assignment is worth 15 of your final grade failure to do it will result in the lowering of your final grade by at least one and possibly two grade letters Plagiarism warning Any evidence that this paper is not your original work will result in a grade of E for the course and in the invocation of the university policy on plagiarism reprinted earlier in this syllabus See part XII of this syllabus above Tentative Schedule of Assignments January 20 Organizational session February 8 Test 1 topics I II March 9 Test 2 topics III IV V April 11 Test 3 topics VI VII VIII Outside writing assignment due April 15 April 29 Test 4 topics IX X May 6 2 00 p m FH 509 make up tests May 10 or 12 Final exam FH 509 10 30 a m The above schedule should be regarded as experimental and tentative I must reserve the right to adjust it as circumstances require WHR Thoughts to Ponder In democracies the most potent cause of revolution is the unprincipled character of popular leaders Aristotle I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house and on all that shall hereafter inhabit it May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof John Adams in letter to wife Abigail November 2 1800 On moving into the White House We cannot survive as a free society with 12 year old s having babies with 15 year old s killing each other in the streets with 17 year old s dying of

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  • Intro to Public Administration
    IX Grading procedures Test 1 20 A 91 100 Test 2 20 B 82 91 Final exam 30 C 73 82 Book review 15 D 63 73 Attendance and participation 15 E below 63 X Academic honesty The policy on academic honesty adopted by the Board of Regents on February 14 1975 and reprinted in the Undergraduate Bulletin is hereby incorporated into this syllabus XI Class policies There are eight complete and total prohibitions 1 talking to one another when it is time for class to begin or after it has begun 2 Walkman radios cassette and CD players or similar gear 3 wearing caps in class 4 eating in class 5 habitual tardiness 6 reading or studying other material or doing homework for another class 7 leaving or preparing to leave before class is dismissed and 8 having cell phones and pagers which sound in class Drinking soft drinks and coffee and laptop computers for taking notes are acceptable but please turn off all cellular phones and pagers when class begins If these rules are not compatible with your values you need to drop the class XII Purpose and objective The purpose and objective of this course is to give the student a basic knowledge and understanding of public administration in general and American public administration in particular so that he she may be a better informed citizen and and more effective participant in the political process You should be different for having been here and taken this course you should know more and understand more on December 4 than you did on August 21 If you do not you have failed and I have failed See Philosophy of Teaching on my homepage XIII Students with disabilities Students with bona fide disabilities should contact me privately and appropriate arrangements will be made XIV Newspapers and television Introduction to Public Administration is a political science course that is timely and relevant Public administration takes place all the time and is reported in the media constantly Illustrations of principles and ideas discussed in class and in your text occur almost every day It is imperative for the good student and good citizen to keep abreast of these developments by reading newspapers magazines and watching television news You should read at least one good newspaper a day better yet would be one national paper one regional paper and one local paper every day One of the best features of newspapers is columns written by nationally syndicated political analysts such as George Will David Broder Georgie Anne Geyer Thomas Sowell and others these are usually found on the editorial page and provide excellent analysis and interpretation of the news as well as news itself To be an intelligent voter in particular and a good citizen in general your learning must be a continuous diligent and life long process You must read every day XV Outside Writing Assignment Your outside writing assignment for POL 370 is to read and write a review of the

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  • execprocess
    the Office of Institutional Diversity Equity and Access 103 Wells Hall 270 809 3155 voice 270 809 3361 TDD cduffy murraystate edu XIII Prerequisites Junior standing an inquiring mind a desire to learn and a willingness to work XIV Purpose and Objective To understand the origin development and current status of the executive process with primary emphasis on the American Presidency XV General websites The White House Presidency Research Group Center for the Study of the Presidency American Memory Historical Collections for the National Digital Library American Presidents Life Portraits The Inaugural Classroom The American Presidency A Chronology of U S Historical Documents Townhall s Congressional Resource Center Presidential Libraries Presidents of the United States THOMAS Legislative Information on the Internet National Archives and Records Administration Findlaw U S Supreme Court Opinions Character Above All An Exploration of Presidential Leadership Federal Law Pertaining to Presidential Elections and Controversies Title 3 United States Code Chapter 1 Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 Public Law 107 243 October 16 2002 I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house and on all that shall hereafter inhabit it May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof John Adams Second President of the United States Letter to his wife Abigail November 2 1800 On moving into the White House Course Outline and Topics of Study I Introduction The United States Constitution Articles I II Amendments XII XX XXII XXV Examine Internet Public Library POTUS Presidents of the United States Bookmark this website for frequent use Also www senate gov and go to Nominations and Statistics and Lists Read and study the chapters on the Presidency and Executive Branch in your text from POL 140 American National Government Go to www usa gov and familiarize yourself with the agencies of the federal government via their websites Also familiarize yourself with the Office of the Federal Register and the official White House website II The Theoretical Basis of Executive Power A M Henderson and Talcott Parsons From Max Weber The Theory of Social and Economic Organization Free Press 1964 The Three Pure Types of Legitimate Authority et seq pp 324 373 including The Routinization of Charisma Email Review Rose Foundations III The American Presidency 1 Ancestry The Magna Carta and Its American Legacy and the English Bill of Rights find on internet The English Bill of Rights Sir William Blackstone Commentaries on the Laws of England volume 1 book 1 chapter 6 Of the King s Duties and chapter 7 Of the King s Prerogative 2 Creation Options Decisions to be made lecture review Article II United States Constitution Alexander Hamilton Federalist s 65 77 Tatalovich Schier Introduction and Chapter 1 3 Establishment Washington the indispensable man Tatalovich Schier Chapter 2 Forrest McDonald Presidential Character the Example of George Washington Perspectives on Political Science Summer 1997 v 26 2 pp 134 139 Seymour Lipset Establishing National Authority in The First New Nation 1963 pp 15 23 POTUS under Washington the Jay Treaty and Washington s Farewell Address Todd Estes The Art of Presidential Leadership George Washington and the Jay Treaty The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography April 1 2001 4 Jefferson and the Jeffersonians See Thomas Jefferson on Politics Government David Mayer By the Chains of the Constitution Separation of Powers Theory and Jefferson s Conception of the Presidency Perspectives on Political Science Summer 1997 v 26 2 pp 140 148 Winfield H Rose Marbury v Madison How John Marshall Changed History by Misquoting the Constitution PS Political Science Politics April 2003 pp 209 214 Read the Marbury opinion at 5 U S 137 1803 Access both via internet Tatalovich Schier Chapter 3 Story Tocqueville Grimke 5 Jackson to Buchanan See POTUS especially Jackson s inaugural addresses the nullification controversy Trail of Tears Jackson s veto of the Second Bank of the United States internet Cherokee Nation v Georgia 30 U S 1 1831 President James K Polk the Mexican War Compromise of 1850 Popular Sovereignty Kansas Nebraska Act Dred Scott v Sandford 1857 and the coming of the Civil War 6 Preservation The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln See Lincoln under POTUS especially the first and second inaugural addresses the Emancipation Proclamation and the Gettysburg Address Doris Kearns Goodwin Team of Rivals The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln Address to the Los Angeles World Affairs Council November 15 2005 Access via LAWAC website This address is based on her book with the same title and is a summary of the book Winfield H Rose The Challenges Lincoln Faced for sale at Copy Express Geoffrey R Stone Civil Liberties in Wartime Access via Journal of Supreme Court History November 2003 and read through the Civil War 7 Age of the Lilliputians Tatalovich Schier Chapter 3 Curtis to end 8 Emergence of the Modern Presidency Theodore Roosevelt to Woodrow Wilson Tatalovich Schier Chapter 4 9 Return to Normalcy Harding Coolidge and Hoover Tatalovich Schier Chapter 5 10 Growth and Consolidation of the Modern Presidency FDR to Ike John Ed Pearce Reflections on FDR on the 40 th anniversary of his death Louisville Courier Journal April 7 1985 Email William E Leuchtenburg Why the Candidates Still Use FDR as Their Measure American Heritage February 1988 Email Arthur Schlesinger Jr The Real Roosevelt Legacy Newsweek October 14 1996 Email Perhaps the most controversial decision of the 20 th century was Truman s decision to use the atomic bomb World War II July 1995 Email Truman s dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur see Neustadt s Presidential Power Tatalovich Schier Chapter 6 11 The Shakespearean Tragedies Kennedy to Carter Tatalovich Schier Chapters 7 8 12 The Reagan Restoration to the Obama Debasement Tatalovich Schier Chapter 9 Philip Abbott Leadership by Exemplar Reagan s FDR and Thatcher s Churchill Presidential Studies Quarterly v 27 2 Spring 1997 pp 186 206 Email Richard Neustadt Has the Cold War Been Won Business Public Affairs Fall 1991 Email Michael Barone He Leaves a

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  • Classical and Medieval Political Thought
    integrity Violations of Academic Honesty include Cheating Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized information such as books notes study aids or other electronic online or digital devices in any academic exercise as well as unauthorized communication of information by any means to or from others during any academic exercise Fabrication and Falsification Intentional alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise Falsification involves changing information whereas fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information Multiple Submission The submission of substantial portions of the same academic work including oral reports for credit more than once without authorization from the instructor Plagiarism Intentionally or knowingly representing the words ideas creative work or data of someone else as one s own in any academic exercise without due and proper acknowledgement Instructors should outline their expectations that may go beyond the scope of this policy at the beginning of each course and identify such expectations and restrictions in the course syllabus When an instructor receives evidence either directly or indirectly of academic dishonesty he or she should investigate the instance The faculty member should then take appropriate disciplinary action Disciplinary action may include but is not limited to the following Requiring the student s to repeat the exercise or do additional related exercise s Lowering the grade or failing the student s on the particular exercise s involved Lowering the grade or failing the student s in the course If the disciplinary action results in the awarding of a grade of E in the course the student s may not drop the course Faculty reserve the right to invalidate any exercise or other evaluative measures if substantial evidence exists that the integrity of the exercise has been compromised Faculty also reserve the right to document in the course syllabi further academic honesty policy elements related to the individual disciplines A student may appeal the decision of the faculty member with the department chair in writing within five working days Note If at any point in this process the student alleges that actions have taken place that may be in violation of the Murray State University Non Discrimination Statement this process must be suspended and the matter be directed to the Office of Equal Opportunity Any appeal will be forwarded to the appropriate university committee as determined by the Provost XII Relevant Web Sites Biographies The Philosphers EpistemeLinks com Philosophy Resources on Internet Augustine Great Books of the Western World Primary Historical Documents from Western Europe Hanover College Historical Texts Project Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Internet Medieval Sourcebook Outside Writing Assignment A major research paper is required of all students and will be due April 16 please do not ask for an extension Please pay attention This paper should be at least 20 textual pages in length printed in 12 font It should be written according to the Style Manual for Political Science published online by the American Political Science Association with a bibliography of at least fifteen substantive sources not all

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