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  • Elements and Attributes
    poly rect blockquote br div id used with styles text containing no spaces used to name a tag h1 h2 h3 h4 h5 h6 align left right center should use css hr color hhhhhh where 0 h f noshade noshade size number width number or percentage include img alt any text width of pixels height of pixels src path name to image file usemap text link href path name to style sheet rel stylesheet type text css map id text containing no spaces used to give a name name still used with id attr for older browsers text containing no spaces used to give a name p span style used for inline styles list of styles See Styles and Values doc style type used for internal styles text css sub sup Lists ul ol li dl dt dd Table table border number cellpadding of pixels cellspacing of pixels frame above below border box hsides lhs rhs void vsides rules all cols groups none rows summary short description of table for those using a screen reader width caption align left right top bottom td align left right center justify valign top middle bottom baseline colspan number rowspan number th align left

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/rsmith1/csc125/faq/html_elements_and_attributes.html (2016-01-26)
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  • CSS - Properties and Values
    the vertical position and can be number top center bottom background repeat repeat repeat x repeat y no repeat background size width height border width style color for example 1px solid rgb 100 50 200 style can be solid dashed dotted double outset inset groove ridge none border bottom width style color Note length is the width of the border ex 1px solid rgb 100 50 200 border left border right border top border collapse tables collapse separate inherit border radius length for example 4em border width number bottom length percent auto inherit box shadow none h shadow v shadow blur spread color inset initial inherit ex 10px 10px 5px ddeeff clear left right both none inherit color color name or rgb p p p where 0 p 100 or rgb x x x where 0 x 255 or hhhhhh where 0 h f display block inline float left right both none inherit font style variant weight size height family font family name of font font size number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc font style italic oblique normal font variant normal small caps inherit font weight bold bolder lighter 100 900 normal height number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc letter spacing number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc line height number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc list style type disc circle square decimal decimal leading zero lower roman upper roman lower alpha upper alpha none list style image url path to file list style position inside outside list style type image position margin top number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc margin right number units mm cm em ex in mm pt px pc margin bottom number

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/rsmith1/csc125/faq/css_properties_and_values.html (2016-01-26)
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  • Luddite History -- Kevin Binfield -- Murray State University
    the villages surrounding Nottingham The 23 March 1811 and 20 April 1811 Nottingham Journal reports several weeks of almost nightly attacks in the villages all successful and carried out without one attacker s being arrested The summer of 1811 was quiet but a bad harvest helped to renew disturbances in November when as the story goes stockingers assembled in the wooded lands near Bulwell and were led in attacks on a number of shops by a commander calling himself Ned Ludd Letters from Midlands correspondents to the Home Office report a number of riotous disturbances including the burning of haystacks and an anonymous letter received by a Magistrate threatening still greater acts of violence by fire Letters dated 13 and 14 November 1811 request that the government dispatch military aid because 2000 men many of them armed were riotously traversing the County of Nottingham In December 1811 public negotiations between the framework knitters and their employers the hosiers some of which were carried out in the two Nottingham newspapers failed to result in the return of wages piece rates and frame rents to earlier levels or in any satisfactory amelioration of the framework knitters economic circumstances Frame breaking continued in the Midlands counties of Nottinghamshire Derbyshire and Leicestershire through the winter and early spring of 1812 It resurfaced in 1814 and again in Leicestershire in the autumn of 1816 The first signs of the spread of Luddism to the cotton manufacturing center of Manchester and its environs in Lancashire Cheshire and Flintshire materialized in December 1811 and January 1812 Manchester Luddism has traditionally been understood as having centered on the cotton weaving trade which had failed in an attempt to organize in 1808 and which was suffering from the use of steam powered looms to decrease the wages of skilled weavers at a time of rising food prices and depressed trade however documents that I have discovered in the McConnell Kennedy and Company papers and Home Office documents that have been entirely overlooked by previous scholars indicate that Luddites were active in defense of the spinning trade too For those documents see Chapter 3 of Writings of the Luddites In Manchester unlike Nottingham the offensive machinery was housed in large factories Luddite raids in and around Manchester tended to be carried out by large numbers of attackers and also often coincided with food riots which provided crowds that were large enough to carry out the factory attacks and that came from a broadly distressed population ready to take action Luddite activity continued in Lancashire and Cheshire into the summer of 1812 and blended into efforts to establish larger trade combinations and into political reform but the force of Luddism dissipated following the acquittal of dozens of accused Luddites in Lancaster later that year and the administration of loyalty oaths coupled with royal pardons conditioned upon the taking of those oaths The factory owners and cloth merchants of the woolen industry in the West Riding of Yorkshire were the targets of

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/kBinfield/luddites/LudditeHistory.htm (2016-01-26)
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  • Luddite Writings -- Kevin Binfield -- Murray State University
    please ask for permission no part of the documents may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of kevin binfield at murraystate edu For complete information about these documents and nearly 200 others from the Midlands Lancashire Cheshire Flintshire and Yorkshire including sources format more accurate texts including excisions and intercalations explanatory footnotes contexts and reception please see Writings of the Luddites ed Kevin Binfield Baltimore and London

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/kBinfield/luddites/LudditeWritings.htm (2016-01-26)
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  • Luddites and Luddism Interpretation -- Kevin Binfield -- Murray State University
    Luddites continued to locate their founding document in what was a living context linking their present to their past through a moral economy which was recognized and chartered by a king and empowered to regulate and sustain itself The nature of self regulatory power is evident in the Charter itself and the Company s Rule Book and has also been outlined by J L Hammond and Barbara Hammond and by Chambers Among the most important mechanisms were those specifically authorizing search supervision and legal standing to ensure quality of work There were also mechanisms for prosecuting those selling substandard goods or undercutting prices for licensing apprentices and for preventing the flow to the Continent of workers and machines As recently as 1808 the Company brought a claim decided at King s Bench favorably to the Company against William Payne who had set up shop without being a freeman of the trade Both Henson and Chambers note the national protectionist intentions underlying the Charter The mingling of trade legal and national political languages and purposes in the Charter make it interesting as a discourse event Most importantly its multiple purposes seem to have facilitated its use as law against law and its use to justify the violent breaking of the objectionable wide stocking frames used to drive down wages and produce inferior material especially hosiery articles that were flimsy or that lost their shape The Charter had established a system of self regulation running beside and sometimes intersecting but usually not threatening the larger legal system The Charter was not merely a political document conferring legal rights over property to the knitters Even the independent artisans working in the moral economy did not own in an ordinary sense the materials that were produced into cloth the regulatory powers held by the Framework Knitters Company are evidence of this Each knitter did however have an investment in those materials by virtue of the Charter In this case economic power and accompanying legal rights derive from a political assignation Often the legal and trade languages are blended almost seamlessly like the gallows and the stocking frame in a March 1812 letter from Genaral Lud s headquarters to George Rowbottom a Nottinghamshire hosier see M23 in Writings of the Luddites Although frame wrecking seems not to have taken place in Nottinghamshire between March and November of 1811 it appears from the 1 January 1812 document titled By the Framework Knitters A Declaration and the November 1811 Declaration Extraordinary that a Luddite subculture had been forming and devising its own language of origination and continuation despite the lull The January Declaration is the more general of the two declarations more clearly oriented toward affirming a system with regulatory powers contained within the charter granted by our late Sovereign Lord Charles the Second M10 in Writings of the Luddites The Luddite writer conceives of the power granted by the Charter to be so great perhaps for reasons of primacy or of decentralizing custom that the framework

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/faculty/kBinfield/luddites/LudditeInterpretations.htm (2016-01-26)
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  • Humanities
    Tale Chaucer The Canterbury Tales in Middle English with word defintions Chaucer The Canterbury Tales searchable by title of prologue and tale Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 2 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 3 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 15 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 16 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 17 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 18 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 19 Machiavelli The Prince Chapter 25 Shakespeare The Tempest Shakespeare The Tempest Elizabeth I Written with a Diamond on Her Window at Woodstock Elizabeth I On Monsieur s Departure Elizabeth I The Doubt of Future Foes Elizabeth I To the English Troops at Tilbury Facing the Spanish Armada Elizabeth I Selected Speeches Elizabeth I Selected Poetry Anne Bradstreet The Prologue Anne Bradstreet The Author to Her Book Anne Bradstreet Before the Birth of One of Her Children Anne Bradstreet A Letter to Her Husband Absent upon Public Employment Anne Bradstreet Another Letter to Her Husband Absent upon Public Employment Anne Bradstreet Here Follows Some Verses upon the Burning of Our House July 10th 1666 Anne Bradstreet In Honor of that High and Mighty Princess Queen Elizabeth of Most Happy Memory Anne Bradstreet To My Dear and Loving Husband John Donne A Valediction Forbidding Mourning

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/hum/hum211_etext.htm (2016-01-26)
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  • Humanities
    Project Perseus Sophocles Antigone Aristotle on Reversal of Fortune and Discovery in Tragedy from Project Perseus Sophocles Antigone Aristotle on Arousing Pity and Fear in Tragedy from Project Perseus Aristophanes Perseus Background Information on Aristophanes Aristophanes Lysistrata Robyn Mitchell Boyask s Study Guide for Lysistrata Aristophanes Lysistrata Athens description and images from Project Perseus Plato The Window Philosophy on the Internet Plato Plato Allegory of the Cave Illustration of the

    Original URL path: http://campus.murraystate.edu/academic/hum/hum211_eresources.htm (2016-01-26)
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  • Humanities
    blake11 html Text of Blake s The Lamb http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems blake8 html Text of Blake s The Tyger http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems blake17 html Text of Browning s My Last Duchess http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems browning1 html Text of Charles Dickens Hard Times http www mastertexts com Dickens Charles Index htm Text of Eliot s The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems eliot1 html Text of Susan Glaspell s A Jury of Her Peers http www learner org exhibits literature story fulltext html Text of Hardy s Channel Firing http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems hardy7 html Text of Hopkins God s Grandeur http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems hopkins2 html Text of Housman s Terence This is Stupid Stuff http www library utoronto ca utel rp poems housman9 html Text of Jackson s The Lottery http mbhs bergtraum k12 ny us cybereng shorts lotry html Text of Sarah Orne Jewett s A White Heron http www public coe edu theller soj tne heron htm Text of Joyce s Eveline http www online literature

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