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    of gene expression in malignancy and 3 Cell Tumor Biology cell signaling pathways and stroma and matrix factors that influence both cancer cell growth and stem cell biology Dr Stephen P Ethier talks about genomics research and how it s being applied in a clinical setting CGMR Program Leader Philip H Howe PhD Cancer Genes Molecular Regulation Program Members Featured Research Project Regulation of Transcript Selective Translation by TGFβ Deciphering

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/se/util/display_mod.cfm?MODULE=/se-server/mod/modules/semod_printpage/mod_default.cfm&PageURL=/research/programs/CGMR_Program/index.htm&VersionObject=61711E2FBB3077A8B75FAB2274F55C20&Template=13&PageStyleSheet=3EA2F307D17F9983F24D78873A83FD01 (2015-11-11)
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  • Zihai Li, MD, PhD
    s Cancer Immunology Program Leader in 2010 His long term primary research interest is the mechanisms of immune regulation by the innate immune system in the context of cancer His research team has made seminal contributions to understanding the immunological properties of heat shock proteins HSPs in cancer immunotherapy and immune tolerance They provided the first genetic evidence linking the heat shock response to antigen cross presentation and adaptive immunity and pioneered the use of autologous tumor derived HSP70 peptide complex for the immunotherapy of human leukemia for which Dr Li was a sponsor of four investigator initiated INDs in HSP vaccination platforms to treat cancer Focusing on the HSP gp96 which induces a tumor specific protective immunity in a variety of experimental tumor models Dr Li s group discovered that gp96 is the master chaperone for TLRs which are important in the immune response to cancer Furthermore using transgenic mouse models they demonstrated the importance of the subcellular localization of gp96 in regulating T cell tolerance This line of research currently focuses on pinpointing the precise mechanism of gp96 TLR interaction and elucidating the implications of this interaction in linking the innate immune system inflammation and T cell responses

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/research/programs/immunology/li.htm (2015-11-11)
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  • Featured Research Project
    to tumor associated immunosuppression has received scant attention Dr Young was among the first to definitively demonstrate that TAECs are immunosuppressive in vitro and in vivo They play a critical role in immune evasion and these effects are associated at least in part with the production of pro inflammatory signals Dr Young showed that isolated TAECs produce large quantities of pro inflammatory molecules including PGE2 and interleukin 6 IL 6 and are potent suppressors of TCR triggered T cell proliferation In culture TAECs can force CD4 T cells to become inducible Treg cells that act to block immune function Dr Young has demonstrated the origin of TAECs from normal endothelial cells One potential approach to eliminate these tumor induced immune inhibitory mechanisms is to redirect the generation of progenitor immune cells by driving their differentiation into stimulatory dendritic cells DCs and to inhibit activity of TAECs by blocking their production of PGE2 Given the observation that TAECs produce PGE2 a study has been initiated at the HCC to treat newly diagnosed HNSCC patients with the combination of vitamin D3 and celecoxib prior to surgery and then evaluate cellular immune changes in the resected specimen as shown in the figure This clinical study will be a follow up on a clinical trial arising out of Dr Young s earlier research and a clinical trial conducted by HCC physicians Drs Terry A Day and M Boyd Gillespie in which HNSCC patients were treated weekly with vitamin D3 for three weeks from the time of diagnosis until surgery Dr Young s observation that active metabolites of vitamin D3 drive the immune inhibitory CD34 progenitor cells into DCs with functional antigen presenting capabilities stimulated this first clinical trial The results demonstrated diminished systemic levels of immune inhibitory progenitor cells and a simultaneous increase in

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/research/programs/immunology/featured_project.htm (2015-11-11)
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    and the development and optimization of novel cell based therapies and 3 Antibody Complement Transplant based Therapies cross cutting studies into antibody complement and transplant based immunotherapeutic strategies Program Leader Zihai Li MD PhD Cancer Immunology Members Featured Research Project Tumor associated Endothelial Cell TAEC and Immune Inhibitory CD34 Progenitor Cells Subvert Immune Defenses Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma HNSCC is a major cancer problem in South Carolina In

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/se/util/display_mod.cfm?MODULE=/se-server/mod/modules/semod_printpage/mod_default.cfm&PageURL=/research/programs/immunology/index.htm&VersionObject=21A24F23A7E586449287DF789C19C681&Template=17520059DFD5952C4D19749FE551BCCC&PageStyleSheet=3EA2F307D17F9983F24D78873A83FD01 (2015-11-11)
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  • Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Research Program
    clinical and correlative science studies The Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Program is co led by Kenneth D Tew PhD and Carolyn D Britten MD and is a central hub where therapeutic focused discoveries across all Hollings Cancer Center programs are translated into clinical studies The program is organized around three themes of scientific investigation 1 Elucidation of Cellular Signaling Pathways 2 Modulation of Redox and Cellular Stress Response and 3 Development of Small Molecule Chemotherapeutic Agents Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Members FEATURED RESEARCH PROJECT Elizabeth S Yeh PhD Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology examines how the deregulation of cellular signaling events results in the physiological changes that lead to human cancer with a specific interest in breast cancer While at the University of Pennsylvania Dr Yeh worked with Dr Lewis Chodosh who identified a novel AMPK related protein kinase called Hormonally Up regulated Neu associated Kinase HUNK whose function has been determined to be critical in the etiology and progression of human breast cancer Dr Yeh s work demonstrated that HUNK promotes the survival of breast cancer cells further suggesting that this molecule could be a therapeutic target In Dr Yeh s continued study of this molecule at MUSC her

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/research/programs/DCT_Program/ (2015-11-11)
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  • Kenneth D. Tew, PhD
    Kenneth D Tew PhD Kenneth D Tew PhD is Professor and Chair of the Department of Cell Molecular Pharmacology at MUSC and holds the John C West Endowed Chair in Cancer Research which is supported by the South Carolina SmartState Center of Excellence in Translational Cancer Therapeutics He currently serves on the editorial boards of ten journals and is associate editor for JPET senior editor for Cancer Research and in 2011 co serial editor for Advances in Cancer Research Dr Tew s credentials include election as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science AAAS election as chair of the Section of Pharmaceutical Sciences AAAS 2012 2015 Chair of Drug Discovery and Development Section of ASPET 2011 2013 and the Astellas USA Foundation Award 2010 Dr Tew has extensive experience in the discovery and development of anti cancer drugs with continuous peer reviewed grant support since 1980 Dr Tew s scientific contributions to the field of cancer drug discovery and development focus on the involvement of redox pathways glutathione S transferases in tumor cell resistance to anticancer drugs Learn more about Kenneth D Tew Print This Page HOLLINGS HOME About Hollings Patient Cancer Information Clinical Trials Research

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/research/programs/DCT_Program/kenneth-tew.htm (2015-11-11)
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  • Carolyn D. Britten, MD
    Safety About MUSC Patient Care Academics Research Physician Portal Careers HR alumni MUSC Hollings Cancer Center Research Research Programs DCT Program Carolyn D Britten MD Carolyn D Britten MD is an Associate Professor in the Division of Hematology Oncology Department of Medicine at MUSC and holds the Charles Westfield Coker Disinguished Endowed Chair in Gastrointestinal Oncology supported by the South Carolina SmartState Program She trained in medical oncology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver Canada and completed a two year clinical research fellowship in Phase I clinical trials at the Institute for Drug Development in San Antonio Texas As a faculty member at the University of California Los Angeles UCLA for 11 years she developed the solid tumor Phase I clinical trials program She joined MUSC HCC in July 2012 with the charge of further developing the Phase I clinical trials effort at the Hollings Cancer Center and enhancing the growth of the Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Program Learn more about Carolyn D Britten Print This Page HOLLINGS HOME About Hollings Patient Cancer Information Clinical Trials Research at Hollings Find a Researcher Research Programs Shared Resources Training Opportunities Conferences Seminars Funding Opportunities Becoming a Member Statewide Commitments Giving to

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/research/programs/DCT_Program/carolyn-britten.htm (2015-11-11)
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    to translate these discoveries into clinical applications by using proof of principle early phase clinical and correlative science studies The Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Program is co led by Kenneth D Tew PhD and Carolyn D Britten MD and is a central hub where therapeutic focused discoveries across all Hollings Cancer Center programs are translated into clinical studies The program is organized around three themes of scientific investigation 1 Elucidation of Cellular Signaling Pathways 2 Modulation of Redox and Cellular Stress Response and 3 Development of Small Molecule Chemotherapeutic Agents Developmental Cancer Therapeutics Members FEATURED RESEARCH PROJECT Elizabeth S Yeh PhD Assistant Professor of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology examines how the deregulation of cellular signaling events results in the physiological changes that lead to human cancer with a specific interest in breast cancer While at the University of Pennsylvania Dr Yeh worked with Dr Lewis Chodosh who identified a novel AMPK related protein kinase called Hormonally Up regulated Neu associated Kinase HUNK whose function has been determined to be critical in the etiology and progression of human breast cancer Dr Yeh s work demonstrated that HUNK promotes the survival of breast cancer cells further suggesting that this molecule could be a

    Original URL path: http://hcc.musc.edu/se/util/display_mod.cfm?MODULE=/se-server/mod/modules/semod_printpage/mod_default.cfm&PageURL=/research/programs/DCT_Program/index.htm&VersionObject=AD959B26F075BF45BBCDD2C5F2D81BAE&Template=17520059DFD5952C4D19749FE551BCCC&PageStyleSheet=3EA2F307D17F9983F24D78873A83FD01 (2015-11-11)
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