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  • Forages For Summer Grazing (2015)
    out by more vigorous higher yielding plants in the stand The general growth period is May to October Peak growth occurs in June July and August It is high in quality with protein levels of 14 to 18 and 60 to 65 digestibility In fact early cut hay may be equal to alfalfa hay Annual lespedeza is readily grazed and has relatively high levels of phosphorus calcium and magnesium Even better it can be grazed without worrying about bloat problems On the down side yields are relatively low at 1 5 to 2 tons per acre in pure stands and 2 to 3 tons when mixed with grasses There are two main types Kobe and Korean Kobe type does better in the coastal plain Both perform well in the piedmont Marion has been the most popular variety but a new variety called Legend is out now that seems to be performing well in tests In some tests the Legend has out yielded Marion by almost double Ideally seeds should be planted in February but can be sown February thru April Seeding rate is 20 to 30 pounds per acre and should be broad cast or put out with a seeder Drills generally put the seed too deep as they should be no more than one half inch in the ground one quarter inch or less being preferred Grazing should be done in a rotational manner If cut for hay lespedeza should be cut in the early bloom stage One note of caution annual lespedeza can and will naturally reseed so it could become somewhat of a pest under certain conditions But don t plan on natural reseeding for the next years grazing One last note don t confuse the annual lespedeza with perennial Sericea lespedeza It too tolerates low fertility and acid soils but is not nearly as high in quality It is a perennial It will spread It can become a nuisance Also if allowed to get over about 18 inches tall it will become hard stemmy woody unpalatable quality drops rapidly tannin levels increase and livestock except goats will not eat it Goats love Sericea As a bonus the high tannin levels have been shown to work as a natural dewormer in the goats If very tall they will only eat the top out and you ll need to mow the tougher stems that are left If grazed when 6 to 8 inches tall it is eaten well by livestock Sericea should be cut for hay when 12 inches tall and whether grazed or mowed should be taken no lower than 3 inches Lime and fertilizer improve palatability Seedling vigor is poor and it cannot be used the first year Sericea is not typically recommended for planting but can be utilized if already on the farm Written By Paul Gonzalez Extension Agent Agriculture Livestock 910 592 7161 paul gonzalez ncsu edu Sampson County North Carolina Posted on Jan 29 2015 Was the information on this page helpful Yes

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2015/01/forages-for-summer-grazing-6/ (2016-02-18)
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  • Don’t Ignore Hybrid Vigor (2014)
    get another 3 heterosis advantage in weaning percent Let s look at an example Say breed A calves average 480 lbs at weaning and breed B calves average 520 lbs Calves sired by breed A out of breed B cows have weaning weights of 540 1bs and calves by breed B sires out of breed A cows average 520 lbs The amount of heterosis from the crossbreeding would be figured by subtracting the straight bred average 480 520 2 500 from the crossbred average 540 520 2 530 and dividing that amount 30 in this example by the straight bred average and multiplying by 100 30 500 100 6 which yields a 6 heterosis value The advantages become even greater if you use a third breed on crossbred cows You get the added pounds from the calf heterosis in the example above You also get greater weaning percentage from the crossbred cows due to higher conception rates and even greater weaning weights due to increased milk production In a study conducted at the Fort Robinson Research Station Cundiff and Gregory 1977 Gregory and Cundiff 1980 crossbred cows raising crossbred calves weaned 23 3 percent more calf weight per cow exposed than straightbred cows raising straightbred calves Two thirds of the advantage was attributed to the maternal heterosis of the cow and one third to the individual heterosis of the calf Other studies have show increases of up to 28 Experiments using Brahman European crosses have demonstrated even greater total increases over the straightbred parents It has been proven through research that hybrid vigor will add pounds to your calf crop In high market price times such as we are in now it may not seem as significant but when prices are low it is extremely important This additional weight should not be dismissed to simply chase black hides Again let me emphasize that I am not in any way bashing degrading or opposing the use of Angus cattle Angus cattle have made great contributions to the beef industry and absolutely have their place in a well planned and implemented crossbreeding system It seems though that some producers see them as a silver bullet and have fallen into a straight breeding rut As I stated earlier more homozygous black cattle are becoming available in all breeds There are breeders developing black Herefords with a few bulls already on the market And I have even seen one registered black Charolais So you can still meet the demand for black calves using a second breed of bull As for ease of management switching bull breeds every four years really isn t that much trouble Most folks buy a new bull every few years anyway Pick two breeds and buy whichever one you don t currently have Having more than one breeding pasture can make things a bit more difficult but opens up other options as well One thing I should mention here is to choose breeds that are similar and complement each other

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2014/12/dont-ignore-hybrid-vigor-2/ (2016-02-18)
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  • 24th Annual Southeast Vegetable & Fruit Expo (2009)
    N C Cooperative Extension Service N C Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services SC Department of Agriculture N C Farm Bureau and N C State University For more information or to register please contact Bonnie Holloman or Cathy Price at the N C Vegetable Growers Association 919 334 0099 or email bhollom bellsouth net You can also visit the web site at http www ncvga com for a complete program Allan Thornton Extension Associate Horticulture Science NC State Posted on Oct 20 2009 Was the information on this page helpful Yes No Care to tell us why Send Explanation Do You Recommend This Article Tweet Find more stories like Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf on Sampson County Center or checkout all the other tags we use Topic Categories and Standalone Pages 4 H Youth Development Agriculture Food Animal Agriculture Aquaculture Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf Farm Health Safety Field Crops Food Safety Processing Local Foods Pest Management Specialty Crops Community Forest Resources Health Nutrition Home Family Lawn Garden Soil Water Air Sampson County Center 55 Agriculture Pl Clinton NC 28328 Map 910 592 7161 910 592 9513 fax Office Hours 8 5 Mon Fri Explore more content from North Carolina Cooperative Extension Tweets from our team Tweets by ncce news Visit one of our other sites Ag BioTech 4 H FFA Shelton Leadership Travel Program Advisory Leadership System Agriculture Natural Resources Community and Rural Development Blackberry Raspberry Information Blueberries Christmas Trees Community Development Community Gardens Cotton Cut Flowers Entomology Insect Biology and Management Equine Husbandry Extension Forestry Extension Gardener Extension Plant Pathology Families Family Consumer Sciences Program Food Safety Gardening Growing Small Farms Healthy Homes Home Energy Conservation Horticulture Integrated Pest Management Local Food Meat Goats Military Outreach Muscadine Grapes NC AgVentures NC Choices NC Cooperative Extension Centennial NC Disaster Information Center NC Farm School NC Fresh Produce Safety NC Pesticide Safety Education NC Steps to Health North Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program Organic Grains Peach Growers Information Poinsettias Poultry 4 H Youth Poultry Extension Soil Science Extension Soybeans Spotted Wing Drosophila Strawberry Growers Information Therapeutic Horticulture Tobacco Growers Information Tourism Extension Find Someone in Our Directory Search by Name County or Dept Search NC State s directory Search NC A T s directory Have a question Maybe One of our Experts can help Ask an Expert What s Popular This Month Pruning Knock Out Roses by Guilford County on 2 7 Energy Tax Credits for Home Improvements Improve Your Home AND Your Utility Bills by Home Energy Conservation Portal on 6 3 How Do I Prune Crape Myrtle by Pender County on 2 14 What Are the Advantages of Using Artificial Insemination AI in Your Livestock Breeding Program by Wilkes County on 12 5 Does Your Lawn or Garden Need Lime by Pender County on 1 25 The Value of Respect by Hoke County on 2 10 Advantages of Crop Rotation by Wilkes County on 12 16 New Edition of Extension Gardener Posted by Extension Gardener Portal on 12

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2009/10/24th-annual-southeast-vegetable-fruit-expo/ (2016-02-18)
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  • Watermelon Fungicide Options for 2009 (2009)
    on many diseases while others like Procure only target powdery mildew Bravo Dithane Pristine Cabrio Quadris Folicur and Switch are the better GSB control options Pristine has been very good at controlling GSB in NC However resistance has occurred with the strobilurins Pristine Cabrio and Quadris in other parts of the country so it is important to incorporate the newer fungicides into a successful program to try and maintain the success Products in different fungicide groups should be alternated for optimal resistance management A fungicides group can easily be found in bold on the label of newer containers and also in the Agricultural Chemical Manual One last comment on specific fungicides it appears that Pristine will be in short supply for 2009 The third component of the recommendations is spray schedule In earlier spring crops grown under moderate to dry conditions spray every 10 14 days In wet periods the scheduled should be shortened to 5 7 days The later into the year watermelons are grown the shorter the spray interval should be This article has compacted the spray recommendations for watermelon to three basic steps start early rotate products and proper scheduling Obviously it is a little more involved than that but if you as a grower master those steps you are well on your way to a successful fungicide program For more information please contact the NC Cooperative Extension Office at 592 7161 Allan Thornton Extension Associate Posted on May 26 2009 Was the information on this page helpful Yes No Care to tell us why Send Explanation Do You Recommend This Article Tweet Find more stories like Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf on Sampson County Center or checkout all the other tags we use Topic Categories and Standalone Pages 4 H Youth Development Agriculture Food Animal Agriculture Aquaculture Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf Farm Health Safety Field Crops Food Safety Processing Local Foods Pest Management Specialty Crops Community Forest Resources Health Nutrition Home Family Lawn Garden Soil Water Air Sampson County Center 55 Agriculture Pl Clinton NC 28328 Map 910 592 7161 910 592 9513 fax Office Hours 8 5 Mon Fri Explore more content from North Carolina Cooperative Extension Tweets from our team Tweets by ncce news Visit one of our other sites Ag BioTech 4 H FFA Shelton Leadership Travel Program Advisory Leadership System Agriculture Natural Resources Community and Rural Development Blackberry Raspberry Information Blueberries Christmas Trees Community Development Community Gardens Cotton Cut Flowers Entomology Insect Biology and Management Equine Husbandry Extension Forestry Extension Gardener Extension Plant Pathology Families Family Consumer Sciences Program Food Safety Gardening Growing Small Farms Healthy Homes Home Energy Conservation Horticulture Integrated Pest Management Local Food Meat Goats Military Outreach Muscadine Grapes NC AgVentures NC Choices NC Cooperative Extension Centennial NC Disaster Information Center NC Farm School NC Fresh Produce Safety NC Pesticide Safety Education NC Steps to Health North Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program Organic Grains Peach Growers Information Poinsettias Poultry 4 H Youth Poultry Extension Soil Science Extension Soybeans

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2009/05/watermelon-fungicide-options-for-2009/ (2016-02-18)
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  • A Summertime Poultry House Ventilation Checklist (2014)
    1 to 2 inches from the center of the evaporative cooling pad For a 6 inch pad you should find that the air is moving through the pad a speed of approximately 350 to 400 feet minute 2 inches and 4 inch pads the air velocity should be approximately 250 and 325 feet minute respectively The lower the air speed the lower the amount of air entering the house For instance for a 6 inch pad if the air is only moving through the pad at a speed of 300ft min instead of 400 ft min it indicates that you are bringing in 25 percent less air than you should be It is very important that the fans are cleaned belts pulley replaced and the house made tight before this test is conducted because low air speeds through evaporative cooling pads can also be caused by poorly maintained fans or excessive air leakage 6 Clean evaporative cooling pad distribution system Make sure the holes in the water distribution pipe are clean to insure that maximum water flow over the surface of the pad can be achieved Water flowing over the surface of the pad helps to keep the pad clean eliminates streaking and minimizes mineral buildup and therefore maximizes cooling Keep in mind that water flowing over the surface of a pad has a negligible effect on static pressure and therefore does not affect the air moving capacity of your fans 7 Clean evaporative cooling pad sumps Dirt in the bottom of evaporative cooling pad sumps provides food for algae and therefore encourages its growth To minimize algae growth sumps should be dumped weekly 8 Clean fan shutters Dirty shutters make it harder for the fans to move air and can therefore decrease their air moving capacity by 20 percent 9 Check temperature of breakers when tunnel fans are operating with an infrared thermometer Generally the temperature of a circuit breaker should not exceed 140 degrees F If it does it means the circuit breaker is in danger of tripping out due to overloading or maintenance related problems 10 Make sure that you have spare fan belts motors fogging nozzles PVC pipe fittings water filters and circuit breakers North Carolina State University and North Carolina A T State University commit themselves to positive action to secure equal opportunity regardless of race color creed national origin religion sex age or disability In addition the two Universities welcome all persons without regard to sexual orientation North Carolina State University North Carolina A T State University U S Department of Agriculture and local governments cooperating Written By James Parsons Area Specialized Agent Agriculture Poultry 910 296 2143 james parsons ncsu edu Duplin County North Carolina Posted on May 13 2014 Was the information on this page helpful Yes No Care to tell us why Send Explanation Do You Recommend This Article Tweet Find more stories like Animal Agriculture on Sampson County Center or checkout all the other tags we use Topic Categories and

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2014/05/a-summertime-poultry-house-ventilation-checklist-4/ (2016-02-18)
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  • Field Crops | North Carolina Cooperative Extension | Page 5
    previously productive hayfields and pastures had been overtaken with weeds or you are just not getting the productiveness you want it may be time MORE Posted 4 14 11 Water Sampling for Healthy Tobacco Transplants Water is not just water when it comes to transplant production Tobacco transplants in the greenhouse as well as other greenhouse crops require certain key components to be produced successfully Depending on your MORE Posted 1 27 11 Getting The Most Out Of Your Soybean Crop Harvest is well underway as corn and tobacco have mostly been harvested Cotton peanuts and sweet potatoes will be the next crops out of the field followed by soybeans As you plan for MORE Posted 9 24 10 You re on page 5 Previous Page Next Page Learn More Using the Resources Below Four Keys to High Yielding Wheat Scouting Aid for Stink Bug Damage in Cotton County Extension Programs Growing Small Farms Sustainable Agriculture in North Carolina Extension Programs at NC State University Agricultural and Resource Economics Extension Crop Science Extension Entomology Insect Biology and Management Extension Plant Pathology Geographical Information Sciences Nutrient Management Peanut Information for the Carolinas and Virginia Plant Disease and Insect Clinic Soil Science Extension Growers Information Portals Cotton Organic Grains Soybeans Tobacco Growers Information Newsletters Sampson Field Report August 2010 Tobacco Connection Newsletter Partnerships and Organizations Center for Environmental Farming Systems NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services NC Drought Management Advisory Council NCSU USDA Forage Program Publications Information and News Extension Publications for Field Crops Integrated Pest Management Blogs NC Agricultural Chemicals Manual NC Grain Marketing Homepage NC Integrated Pest Management Portal NC Official Variety Tests NC Pest News NC Small Grains Production Information Organic Field Crop Production and Marketing Soybean Scouting Manual Resources DTN The Progressive Farmer Fumigation Rules Swine and Forage Crops Swine and Waste Management and Forages Information Topic Categories and Standalone Pages 4 H Youth Development Agriculture Food Animal Agriculture Aquaculture Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf Farm Health Safety Field Crops Food Safety Processing Local Foods Pest Management Specialty Crops Community Forest Resources Health Nutrition Home Family Lawn Garden Soil Water Air Sampson County Center 55 Agriculture Pl Clinton NC 28328 Map 910 592 7161 910 592 9513 fax Office Hours 8 5 Mon Fri Explore more content from North Carolina Cooperative Extension Tweets from our team Tweets by ncce news Visit one of our other sites Ag BioTech 4 H FFA Shelton Leadership Travel Program Advisory Leadership System Agriculture Natural Resources Community and Rural Development Blackberry Raspberry Information Blueberries Christmas Trees Community Development Community Gardens Cotton Cut Flowers Entomology Insect Biology and Management Equine Husbandry Extension Forestry Extension Gardener Extension Plant Pathology Families Family Consumer Sciences Program Food Safety Gardening Growing Small Farms Healthy Homes Home Energy Conservation Horticulture Integrated Pest Management Local Food Meat Goats Military Outreach Muscadine Grapes NC AgVentures NC Choices NC Cooperative Extension Centennial NC Disaster Information Center NC Farm School NC Fresh Produce Safety NC Pesticide Safety Education NC Steps to Health North

    Original URL path: http://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/categories/agriculture-food/field-crops/page/5/ (2016-02-18)
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  • Lesser Cornstalk Borer in Soybeans (2014)
    Soil Water Air Sampson County Center 55 Agriculture Pl Clinton NC 28328 Map 910 592 7161 910 592 9513 fax Office Hours 8 5 Mon Fri Explore more content from North Carolina Cooperative Extension Tweets from our team Tweets by ncce news Visit one of our other sites Ag BioTech 4 H FFA Shelton Leadership Travel Program Advisory Leadership System Agriculture Natural Resources Community and Rural Development Blackberry Raspberry Information Blueberries Christmas Trees Community Development Community Gardens Cotton Cut Flowers Entomology Insect Biology and Management Equine Husbandry Extension Forestry Extension Gardener Extension Plant Pathology Families Family Consumer Sciences Program Food Safety Gardening Growing Small Farms Healthy Homes Home Energy Conservation Horticulture Integrated Pest Management Local Food Meat Goats Military Outreach Muscadine Grapes NC AgVentures NC Choices NC Cooperative Extension Centennial NC Disaster Information Center NC Farm School NC Fresh Produce Safety NC Pesticide Safety Education NC Steps to Health North Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program Organic Grains Peach Growers Information Poinsettias Poultry 4 H Youth Poultry Extension Soil Science Extension Soybeans Spotted Wing Drosophila Strawberry Growers Information Therapeutic Horticulture Tobacco Growers Information Tourism Extension Find Someone in Our Directory Search by Name County or Dept Search NC State s directory Search NC A T s directory Have a question Maybe One of our Experts can help Ask an Expert What s Popular This Month Pruning Knock Out Roses by Guilford County on 2 7 Energy Tax Credits for Home Improvements Improve Your Home AND Your Utility Bills by Home Energy Conservation Portal on 6 3 How Do I Prune Crape Myrtle by Pender County on 2 14 What Are the Advantages of Using Artificial Insemination AI in Your Livestock Breeding Program by Wilkes County on 12 5 Does Your Lawn or Garden Need Lime by Pender County on

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2014/07/lesser-cornstalk-borer-in-soybeans/ (2016-02-18)
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  • What Can Gardeners Do To Protect Themselves During The Summer Heat? (2011)
    to plan around the outside conditions If the forecast is extreme temperatures and high humidity plan to work outside early in the morning and late in the evening to minimize exposure to the heat and the sun s ultraviolet rays As always work smarter not harder Reminder Please call the Sampson County Cooperative Extension Center at 910 592 7161 with your horticultural questions and to register for any upcoming events Be sure to check out the Ask An Expert Widget at sampson ces ncsu edu for any questions you may have Don t forget the Extension Master Gardener Hotline is open on Monday s from 8 30 am to 12 30 pm and master gardeners are standing by to answer your horticultural questions Please call 910 592 7161 to speak with a Sampson County Master Gardener Volunteer regarding your horticultural related questions Posted on Jun 6 2011 Was the information on this page helpful Yes No Care to tell us why Send Explanation Do You Recommend This Article Tweet Find more stories like Lawn Garden on Sampson County Center or checkout all the other tags we use Topic Categories and Standalone Pages 4 H Youth Development Agriculture Food Animal Agriculture Aquaculture Commercial Horticulture Nursery Turf Farm Health Safety Field Crops Food Safety Processing Local Foods Pest Management Specialty Crops Community Forest Resources Health Nutrition Home Family Lawn Garden Soil Water Air Sampson County Center 55 Agriculture Pl Clinton NC 28328 Map 910 592 7161 910 592 9513 fax Office Hours 8 5 Mon Fri Explore more content from North Carolina Cooperative Extension Tweets from our team Tweets by ncce news Visit one of our other sites Ag BioTech 4 H FFA Shelton Leadership Travel Program Advisory Leadership System Agriculture Natural Resources Community and Rural Development Blackberry Raspberry Information Blueberries Christmas Trees Community Development Community Gardens Cotton Cut Flowers Entomology Insect Biology and Management Equine Husbandry Extension Forestry Extension Gardener Extension Plant Pathology Families Family Consumer Sciences Program Food Safety Gardening Growing Small Farms Healthy Homes Home Energy Conservation Horticulture Integrated Pest Management Local Food Meat Goats Military Outreach Muscadine Grapes NC AgVentures NC Choices NC Cooperative Extension Centennial NC Disaster Information Center NC Farm School NC Fresh Produce Safety NC Pesticide Safety Education NC Steps to Health North Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program Organic Grains Peach Growers Information Poinsettias Poultry 4 H Youth Poultry Extension Soil Science Extension Soybeans Spotted Wing Drosophila Strawberry Growers Information Therapeutic Horticulture Tobacco Growers Information Tourism Extension Find Someone in Our Directory Search by Name County or Dept Search NC State s directory Search NC A T s directory Have a question Maybe One of our Experts can help Ask an Expert What s Popular This Month Pruning Knock Out Roses by Guilford County on 2 7 Energy Tax Credits for Home Improvements Improve Your Home AND Your Utility Bills by Home Energy Conservation Portal on 6 3 How Do I Prune Crape Myrtle by Pender County on 2 14 What Are the

    Original URL path: https://sampson.ces.ncsu.edu/2011/06/what-can-gardeners-do-to-protect-themselves-during-the-summer-heat/ (2016-02-18)
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