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  • CPFR Model:  3. Execution: Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR): A Tutorial - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    3 Execution Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial Published on Jan 31 2011 by Cecil Bozarth PhD North Carolina State University CPFR Model 3 Execution CPFR Execution Order Generation Overview Order Generation Steps Order Generation Output CPFR Execution VICS CPFR Model Place orders prepare and deliver shipments receive and stock product on retail shelves record sales transactions and make payments Also called the order to cash cycle Order generation Transitions order forecasts into firm demand Order fulfillment Producing shipping delivering and stocking the products Order Generation Overview This step marks the transformation of the order forecast into a committed order Either the seller or buyer can handle order generation depending on competencies systems and resources Regardless of who completes this task the created order is expected to consume the forecast Order Generation Steps Order Generation Output A committed order generated directly from the frozen period of the order forecast An order acknowledgment sent by the customer Categories SCM Tutorials CPFR Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as soon as we post them Privacy Policy Related Articles Introduction Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial Organizational Implications Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutoria CPFR Model Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial CPFR Model 1 Strategy and Planning Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR CPFR Model 2 Demand Supply Management Collaborative Planning Forecasting Replenishment CPFR Model 3 Execution Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial CPFR Model 4 Analysis Exception Management Collaborative Planning Forecasting Replenishment CPFR Model 4 Analysis Performance Assessment and Collaboration Collaborative Planning Forecas References Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial Summary Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/cpfr-model-3.-execution-collaborative-planning-forecasting-and-replenishmen (2016-04-30)
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  • CPFR Model:  4. Analysis - Exception Management: Collaborative Planning, Forecasting & Replenishment - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    criteria are agreed to in the collaboration arrangement Sales and order forecast exceptions are resolved by querying shared data email telephone conversations meetings and so on and submitting any resulting changes to the appropriate forecast Identify forecast exceptions Identify the exceptions 1 Retrieve exception criteria Retrieve the sales order forecast exception criteria e g retail in stock percent or measures such as forecast accuracy 2 Identify changes updates Identify seller or buyer changes or updates to the joint business plan e g a change in the number of stores 3 Compare item values against exception criteria Compare each item s value for the selected criteria to the constraint value e g store in stock for item X is 83 versus the criteria value of 90 4 Identify exception items Identify items as exception items if their values fall outside the constraints Resolve the exceptions 1 Retrieve exception items and decision support data Data elements are defined in the collaboration arrangement and include both time series data e g historical sales and non time series e g in stock percent data 2 Select desired exception criteria values Ex all items with a store in stock percent less than 90 percent 3 Research exceptions Use the shared event calendar and supporting information to look for cause 4 Heighten collaboration If research does not yield satisfactory forecast changes or resolve the exception then either partner can heighten the collaboration 5 Submit changes to sales order forecast If research changes the forecast and or resolves the exception submit the change to the sales order forecast Exception Management Output List of exceptions in the sales and order forecasts Resolution of identified exceptions Adjusted forecast Categories SCM Tutorials CPFR Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/cpfr-model-4.-analysis-exception-management-collaborative-planning-forecast (2016-04-30)
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  • Organizational Implications: Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR): A Tutoria - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    and Effectiveness In all cases category managers should base their decisions on historical data and judgment 1 Pricing Category Managers need access to regular sales trend and pricing data Typical questions include What are the key category price points low high differences by market etc What are the competitors prices How does price affect sales volume How effective are category pricing initiatives in building sales 2 New Product Launch When launching a new product it is crucial to know who is buying and whether the product is attracting new or existing category buyers Key questions include How many households have tried the new product Are these buyers new to the category How did trial consumers respond to advertising and promotions What effect did these activities have on the category Has the new brand bought in new category buyers 3 Category Dynamics Understanding what consumers are purchasing in and across stores is key to addressing issues such as Which products drive category growth Where are the retail opportunities for the category How does the category perform across various retail banners In addition getting the right mix and number of products in the category is a challenge Assortment what is the most appropriate product mix What is the optimal number of SKU s within a category brand Where will volume go if SKU s are deleted 4 Competitive Cross Category Analysis Category Managers must understand their performance in context with competing categories Knowing which categories to watch is half the battle Some issues to consider include What other categories interact with mine and which are important What cross category opportunities are there How loyal are category buyers 5 Promotion Efficiency Effectiveness How efficient are the category promotions Which product promotions have the most impact on the category growth How can I better

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/organizational-implications-collaborative-planning-forecasting-and-replenis (2016-04-30)
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  • CPFR Model:  1. Strategy and Planning: Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR) - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    Output What Does CPFR Strategy and Planning Involve VICS CPFR Model Establish the ground rules for the collaborative relationship Determine product mix and placement and develop event plans for the period Collaboration arrangement Setting the business goals and defining the scope for the relationship Assigning roles responsibilities checkpoints and escalation procedures Joint business plan Identifies the significant events that affect supply and demand such as promotions inventory policy changes store openings closings and product introductions Collaboration Arrangement Steps Collaboration Arrangement Output A document that gives both partners a co authored blueprint for beginning the collaborative relationship Defines the process in practical terms Identifies the roles of each trading partner and how the performance of each will be measured Spells out the readiness of each organization and the opportunities available to maximize the benefits from their relationship Formalizes each party s commitment and willingness to exchange knowledge and share in the risk Joint Business Plan Steps Joint Business Plan Output A mutually agreed upon joint business plan that clearly identifies the roles strategies and tactics for the SKU s that are to be brought under the umbrella of CPFR Cornerstone of the forecasting process Should greatly reduce exceptions and the need for excessive interactions Categories SCM Tutorials CPFR Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as soon as we post them Privacy Policy Related Articles Introduction Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial CPFR Model Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial CPFR Model 1 Strategy and Planning Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR CPFR Model 2 Demand Supply Management Collaborative Planning Forecasting Replenishment CPFR Model 3 Execution Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR A Tutorial CPFR Model 4 Analysis Performance Assessment and Collaboration Collaborative Planning Forecas CPFR Model 4

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/cpfr-model-1.-strategy-and-planning-collaborative-planning-forecasting-and (2016-04-30)
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  • Managing Relationships in the Supply Chain - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    this feeling succinctly Supply chain management is one of the most emotional experiences I ve ever witnessed There have been so many mythologies that have developed over the years people blaming other people for their problems based on some incident that may or may not have occurred sometime in the past Once you get everyone together into the same room you begin to realize the number of false perceptions that exist People are still very reluctant to let someone else make decisions within their area It becomes especially tricky when you show people how sub optimizing their functional area can optimize the entire supply chain Materials management vice president Fortune 500 manufacturer The experience is not unique to this company Almost every individual interviewed by the authors who was involved in a supply chain management initiative emphasized the criticality of developing and maintaining good relationships with the customers and suppliers in the chain In deploying the integrated supply chain developing trust on both sides of the partnership is critical to success In discussing the importance of relationships in supply chain management trust building is emphasized as an ongoing process that must be continually managed In short trust takes time to develop but can disappear very quickly if abused In the early stages of supply chain development organizations often eliminate suppliers or customers that are clearly unsuitable whether because they do not have the capabilities to serve the organization are not well aligned with the company or are simply not interested in developing a more collaborative relationship typically required for successful SCM After these firms are eliminated organizations may concentrate on supply chain members who are willing to contribute the time and effort required to create a strong relationship Firms may consider developing a special type of supply chain relationship with this supplier in which confidential information is shared assets are invested in joint projects and significant joint improvements are pursued These types of inter organizational relationships are sometimes called strategic alliances A strategic alliance is a pro cess wherein participants willingly modify basic business practices to reduce duplication and waste while facilitating improved performance Strategic alliances allow firms to improve efficiency and effectiveness by eliminating waste and duplication in the supply chain However many firms lack the guidelines to develop implement and maintain supply chain alliances Creating and managing a strategic alliance often represents a major change in the way companies do business In creating new value systems companies must re think how they view their customers and suppliers They must concentrate not just on maximizing their own profits but also on how to maximize the success of all organizations in the supply chain Strategic priorities must consider other key alliance partners that contribute value for the end customer Tactical and operational plans should be continuously shared and coordinated Instead of encouraging companies to hold their information close trust building processes promote the sharing of all forms of information possible that will allow supply chain members to make better aligned

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/managing-relationships-in-the-supply-chain (2016-04-30)
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  • The New Supply Chain Model - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    of managing supply chains simply doesn t work anymore In fact the downturn in the economy has reinforced the need to take waste out of different nodes across the entire supply chain In industries such as automotive electronics transportation and industrial equipment senior executives realize that raising prices is no longer an option and neither is the possibility of dramatically increasing sales in a flat economy This leaves one option reducing costs across the supply chain A General Motors executive recently told me Our only opportunity left is to take out cost and work better with our suppliers While the decision to continue with zero discounts helped to keep many GM employees and suppliers in their jobs we realize that we will pay the piper in the first quarter In fact many companies today are realizing that in the future supply chains compete against supply chains To succeed in difficult as well as prosperous economic times organizations in a supply chain will need to concurrently step on the brakes as well as step on the gas The New Supply Chain Model The new supply chain model was described by Jeff Trimmer formerly of Daimler Chrysler in terms of three principles The only entity that puts money into a supply chain is the end customer The only solution that is stable over the long term is where every element of the supply chain from raw material to end customer profits from the business Supply chain management is about economic value added and total content of a product service What does this new model mean for managers who are still faced with the day to day realities of meeting deadlines schedules and inventory requirements It means that your organization needs to re design your supply chain design infrastructure The Supply Chain Resource Consortium SCRC at North Carolina State University http scm ncsu edu has developed a readiness tool that may help managers understand what this strategy encompasses Despite all the hoopla about e commerce supply chain management s sourcing and physical distribution elements remain building blocks for the new supply chain model In fact the new model includes three major pillars managing relationships managing supply chain material flows and managing information Effective partnering between companies and their suppliers remains a key to supply chain excellence In the words of Phil McIntyre of Milliken Company Sitting down and communicating effectively with people in your supply chain goes a long way towards improving the bottom line Understanding the flow of materials through multiple tiers of suppliers and customers is a crucial first step General Motors is working on developing an order to delivery strategy for selling vehicles over the Internet and delivering customized vehicles in a shorter time To make this happen GM managers and SCRC research associates have been creating process maps of GM s supply chain structure to better understand the information flows between multiple supplier tiers and to identify opportunities for further reductions in inventory and cycle time Before jumping into

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/the-new-supply-chain-model (2016-04-30)
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  • Creating Information Visibility in the Chain - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    Although the number of such applications is growing daily one of the most promising is the ability to create information visibility between original equipment manufacturers OEM s or large service providers such as airlines and their lower tier suppliers A paper on this subject written by a group of students from NC State University recently won the 2002 Fogelman International Student Paper Award Information visibility within the supply chain is the process of sharing critical data required to manage the flow of products services and information in real time between suppliers and customers If information is available but cannot be accessed by the parties most able to react to a given situation its value degrades exponentially Increasing information visibility between supply chain participants can help all parties reach their overall goal of increased stockholder value through revenue growth asset utilization and cost reduction To improve responsiveness across their supply chains companies are exploring the use of collaborative models that share information across multiple tiers of participants in the supply chain from their supplier s supplier to their customer s customer These trading partners need to share forecasts manage inventories schedule labor optimize deliveries and in so doing reduce costs improve productivity and create greater value for the final customer in the chain Software for Business Process Optimization BPO and Collaborative Planning Forecasting and Replenishment CPFR are evolving to help companies collaboratively forecast and plan amongst partners manage customer relations and improve product life cycles and maintenance Traditional supply chains are rapidly evolving into dynamic trading networks 2 comprised of groups of independent business units sharing planning and execution information to satisfy demand with an immediate coordinated response Perhaps no other company has been as successful in implementing information visibility as a competitive strategy than Dell Computer Dell has fulfilled its commitments to customers through the company s direct model in which it holds only hours of inventory yet promises customers lead times of five days Component suppliers who wish to do business with Dell have to hold some level of inventory since their cycle times are typically much longer than Dell s 3 By utilizing the Web Dell provides its supplier with forecasting information and receives information about the supplier s ability to meet the forecasts Dell uses i2 Technologies products for demand fulfillment operations and products from Agile Software for engineering change order and bill of materials management Communication between engineering changes component availability capacity and other data between Dell and its suppliers flows both ways in addition to forecasting and inventory data Dell is also able to review suppliers and place Web based orders into their factories in hours After outsourcing to third party contract manufacturers Dell executives realized that many of these manufacturers did not have adequate visibility of customer orders This was a major driver in the initiative to increase visibility of orders Dell s build to order web based customer model has become the benchmark for other industries and organizations such as General Motors Ford

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/creating-information-visibility-in-the-chain (2016-04-30)
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  • Trends and Strategies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management: An Interview with Robert Handfield - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    Experts SCM Faculty Experts Cecil Bozarth Ph D Clyde M Crider MBA Donavon Favre MA Tracy Freeman MBA Robert Handfield Ph D Jeffrey Stonebraker Ph D Don Warsing Ph D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC Article Library Trends and Strategies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management An Interview with Robert Handfield Trends and Strategies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management An Interview with Robert Handfield Published on Nov 19 2013 by Robert Handfield Ph D Executive Director of SCRC Bank of America University Distinguished Professor of Supply Chain Management Download the Transcript Categories Logistics SCM Features SCM Insights Videos SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as soon as we post them Privacy Policy Related Articles Trends and Strategies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management An Interview with Robert Handfield Global Logistics Q A with John Camp Lenovo Global Logistics Trends Strategies Survey Reverse Logistics Outbound Logistics Logistics Management Logistics Information Systems Inbound Logistics Logistics in China DELIVER China Series Part 5 Driving Logistics Change in the Pharmaceutical Industry Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and Tax Primer NAICS Navigator SCM Blog Business Process Outsourcing Forecasting Healthcare Supply Management Supply Chain Analytics SCM Tutorials CPFR Forecasting Inventory Management Procurement SCM Features Hot Topics Lessons Learned Facts Figures SC Security SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Procurement Process Six Sigma SC Risk Supplier Partnerships SCM Supplier Evaluation Logistics Global Logistics Logistics Definition SCM Procurement E Procurement SCM Video Insights Library SCM Research Production Labor Sourcing SCM Pain Points Supply Chain

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/trends-and-strategies-in-logistics-and-supply-chain-management-an-interview (2016-04-30)
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