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  • Global Logistics, Q&A with John Camp, Lenovo - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    exists in your global logistics system John Camp Lenovo Sure we have a number of initiatives We want to get closer to our customers so we re spending a lot of time and our energies on our customer experience and all of the interactions that we have with our customers making those an improved differentiator for us in terms of the way our customers deal with us and then extending that all the way back through our own manufacturing and production resources all the way through to our suppliers So for us it s a challenge of connecting all of the nodes on the supply chain not only physically but through information We have a number of initiatives that are focused on customer service and operational aspects of that to run our ever increasing ever complex network Emerging Technologies Mobile Devices and the Horizon Rob Handfield Co Director of SCRC Do you see any emerging technologies on the horizon that you think will be important to be able to deal with these things Whether it s integration of mobile devices GPS technology software as a service performance analytics as a service the kinds of things that you read about for instance in a Gartner report Are you looking at all of those potential things on the horizon John Camp Lenovo Sure we definitely are I think that one of the biggest challenges right now in the supply chain is dealing with all of the information that we have to manage So clearly the trend toward big data and improved analytics clearly are on our minds Moving to the cloud and being able to build a community with our partners and with our customers that gives all access to a single version of the truth is really important to us right now And we re really shaping our strategy from a technology and from an internal strategic planning perspective Value of Interacting with the SCRC at NC State Rob Handfield Co Director of SCRC I know we ve had a few projects here working with Lenovo on big data on different kinds of technologies I wonder if you might be able to comment on the value of the interaction that you have with the SCRC at NC State with the student teams and kind of getting out of the box thinking perhaps from some of our students to help drive some of your thinking within your group John Camp Lenovo We ve had a long relationship with the SCRC and it s been a valuable part of our thought process and our formulation of our strategies and plans The thought leadership that we need comes from many different sources It comes from industry thinking and it comes from forums like this where we can have the benefit of the thought leadership that s happening here on the NC State campus and to put it into action with some of the projects some of the practicums that we can collaborate with students

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/global-logistics-qa-with-john-camp-lenovo (2016-04-30)
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  • What Do You Need to Know about Supply Chain Management (SCM)? - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    products or services in a timely cost effective manner if they want to tackle broader supply chain issues Therefore programs such as Total Quality Management Just in Time manufacturing concurrent product development and the like are just as relevant today as they were in the past In fact it s interesting to note that many of the firms that have emerged as SCM leaders had already established their reputations in other areas beforehand The second thing to understand about SCM is that it often requires significant changes in the firm s organizational structure SCM issues cut across functional areas and even business entities Therefore the responsibility and authority for implementing SCM must be placed at the highest levels of an organization Firms that attempt to imbed SCM within a functional unit such as purchasing operations or logistics usually have limited success Third SCM requires firms to put in place information systems and metrics that focus on performance across the entire supply chain This is because individual units that seek to maximize their performance without regard to the broader impact on the supply chain can cause problems For example a manufacturing unit s decision to minimize its inventory levels may reduce delivery performance to the end user Likewise a distributor s decision to chase highly seasonal demand may bullwhip its upstream partners causing significant cost overruns Putting in place the information systems and metrics needed to make intelligent decisions in the face of such trade offs presents a significant challenge to supply chain partners Finally SCM adds another layer of complexity to a firm s strategy development efforts Years ago firms could succeed by being particularly good in one functional area such as marketing finance or operations Then firms recognized that they had to have sufficient capabilities across multiple functional areas

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/what-do-you-need-to-know-about-scm (2016-04-30)
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  • Why Do You Need To Know About Supply Chain Management (SCM)? - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    and a variety of other approaches The late 1990s and early 2000s saw the emergence of on line trading communities that put thousands of buyers and sellers in touch with one another Ariba is just one example of a business to business B2B exchange The old paper type transactions are becoming increasingly obsolete At the same time the proliferation of new telecommunications and computer technology has made instantaneous communications a reality Such information systems like Wal Mart s satellite network can link together suppliers manufacturers distributors retail outlets and ultimately customers regardless of location Increased Competition and Globalization The second major trend is increased competition and globalization of businesses The rate of change in markets products and technology is increasing leading to situations where managers must make decisions on shorter notice with less information and with higher penalty costs New competitors are entering into markets that have traditionally been dominated by domestic firms At the same time customers are demanding quicker delivery state of the art technology and products and services better suited to their individual needs In some industries product life cycles are shrinking from years to a matter of two or three months One management guru even compared current global markets to the fashion industry in which products go in and out of style with the season Despite the imposing challenges of today s competitive environment some organizations are thriving These firms have embraced the changes facing today s markets and have put a renewed emphasis on improving their operations and in particular supply chain performance For instance Johnson Controls can now receive an order for seats from a Ford assembly plant make the seats and deliver the order all within four hours This requires incredibly flexible operations within Johnson s own manufacturing systems as well as dependable information links with its supply chain partners To survive many firms today find that they must increase market share on a global basis and be on the ground floor of rapid global economic expansion Simultaneously these firms must vigorously defend their domestic market share from a host of world class international competitors To meet this challenge managers are seeking to find ways to rapidly expand their global presence They must position inventories so products are available when customers regardless of location want them in the right quantity and for the right price This level of performance is a constant challenge to organizations and can only occur when all parties in a supply chain are on the same wavelength Relationship Management The information revolution has given companies a wide range of technologies for better managing their operations and supply chains Furthermore increasing customer demands and global competition have given firms the incentive to improve these areas But this is not enough Any efforts to improve operations and supply chain performance are likely to be inconsequential without the cooperation of other firms As a result more companies are putting an emphasis on relationship management Of all the activities operations and supply chain

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/why-do-you-need-to-know-about-scm (2016-04-30)
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  • Key Sustainability Issues in the Electronics Industry: Sustainability Industry Report - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    uniformity of metrics being collected Wall Mart spearheaded Sustainability Consortium Group that attracted 82 members with only few electronics companies joining HP Samsung LG Toshiba but no companies on our list are members Carbon Disclosure Project Supply Chain members list little over 50 member companies World business council on sustainable development has only 38 member companies in North America in 68 in EU Fragmentation in reporting and disjoint membership is a testament to the complexity of standardizing sustainability reports as well as unwillingness by the corporate world to engage in solving this problem Best Practices Highlights During our research we have found few companies that stand out from the pack in terms of their supply chain management and focus on sustainable business practices In this section we are highlighting some of the best practices we have found and we recommend that they are being used across the industry as applicable Nokia Sustainable Business Practices Leader It is not a surprise that Finish based Nokia scored the highest in our scorecard Scandinavian countries and companies are known worldwide for their focus on sustainability in general The importance of the sustainability is reflected in the corporate organization and embodied within Nokia Leadership Team called the Group Executive Board that approves sustainability and related Key Performance Indicators as part of the strategic planning process Hence the company reports so much more about their operations than what is required by regulation they publish annual reports for Global Reporting Initiative Carbon Disclosure Project Global eSustainability Initiative GeSI materiality analysis and UN Global Impact All their reports are audited by an independent third party usually PwC which is different practice from other companies that rely of self reporting without accountability or verification by a neutral party But Nokia doesn t stop there They have very active educational program for their suppliers that resulted in 66 of them publishing similar reports by 2010 Because Nokia has sold over billion handsets worldwide the product lifetime from cradle to grave is on forefront of their product development They start with products that as environmentally friendly as possible by sourcing raw materials that are either biodegradable or made from recycled materials Since 2007 the company has been striving to make sustainable devices In fact 100 of the materials used in these sustainable devices can be and are used again through collection of e waste Applied Materials Sustainability Strategy Bruce Klafter Director for Environmental Health and Safety EHS at Applied Materials Inc Provided some tips about how to build a sustainability strategy in a company Step1 Shift thinking from risk to opportunity Bruce believes a sustainability strategy provides a chance to both improve risk mitigation and to identify new business opportunities Companies should not neglect the risk side because companies must at the very least be in compliance with regulatory requirements At the same time companies should also focus on opportunities Cost savings Enhanced workforce Production improvements Revenue opportunities and Business model innovation Step 2 lay the foundation for sustainability program Bruce suggests understanding firstly about how the company is performing in terms of the key sustainability metrics Then the company should work through a process that includes brainstorming benchmarking planning and articulating the aspirations in terms of a vision that can later be translated into specific projects Internal and external communications regarding those plans will help fuel an ongoing process Step 3 Get others involved It is believed to be essential to get input from key participants because the company can use this process to drive consensus around programs and then garner buy in as the action moves forward White paper from http www naem org CP Sus Program Whirlpool s focus on sustainability and transparency Whirlpool Corporation from their participation in the newly released ISO 50001 energy management standard to their 100 year history of being part of the community to their well developed sustainability and corporate responsibility programs are a great company to benchmark as a best practice Not only do they have mature programs and a focus on continual improvement but they also are very transparent and willing to share this information Of all the companies evaluated Whirlpool had the most historical information available on their sustainability programs E waste collection E waste activity is becoming a norm in the telecommunications industry Many of the companies involved in the sale of wireless devices discussed take back programs and reported these volumes annually in their CR or sustainability reports This is encouraging and demonstrates the trend towards sustainability in the industry As the product life cycles become shorter and shorter it is critical the industry continues to leverage take backs to offset the environmental impacts associated with improperly disposed phones Since this practice was only discussed in the phone sector we consider it a best practice of the industry Dow Corning energy efficient distribution center Dow Corning built a energy efficient distribution center which uses optimized workflows to improve materials delivery capabilities quality and customer service performance Dow Corning transparent structural silicone adhesive Dow Corning TSSA was used to attach insulating glass units to the spider facade system which allows creating a frameless glass façade improving a building s lifespan and efficiency The company increased the levels of roof insulation and installed heat recovery facilities on the HVAC heating ventilation and air conditioning systems The use of natural lighting was maximized via the use of roof lights and where possible motion lighting controls The structure of the distribution center is also equipped to support solar panels on the roof Furthermore the new distribution center increases Dow Corning s safety performance Safety interlocks at the loading bays make it impossible for the trucks to drive off accidentally state of the art high integrity designs for the containment systems guarantee that chemicals are managed responsibly and high integrity fire detection and protection systems ensure the highest possible level of safety Texas Instruments supplier management IT solution TI uses an internally developed program called CETRAQ to evaluate its suppliers CETRAQ stands

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/key-sustainability-issues-in-the-electronics-industry-sustainability-indust (2016-04-30)
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  • Supply Chain Management Articles Library - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC Articles Library Supply Chain Management Articles Latest Supply Chain Management Articles Key Sustainability Issues in the Electronics Industry Sustainability Industry Report By SCRC Team 7 Spring 2012 Posted 06 18 2012 Executive Summary In general we learned sustainability is not as simple as recycling or being green To be sustainable is to look after the environment the people living and working Categories SCM Features Facts Figures Supply Chain Sustainability Supply Chain Sustainability Reports Supply Chain View from the Field Blog Robert Handfield Supply Chain Management Articles Library Supply Chain Executive Training Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and Tax Primer NAICS Navigator SCM Blog Business Process Outsourcing Forecasting Healthcare Supply Management Supply Chain Analytics SCM Tutorials CPFR Forecasting Inventory Management Procurement SCM Features Hot Topics Lessons Learned Facts Figures SC Security SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Procurement Process Six Sigma SC Risk Supplier Partnerships SCM Supplier Evaluation Logistics Global Logistics Logistics Definition SCM Procurement E Procurement SCM

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/key-sustainability-issues-in-the-electronics-industry-sustainability-indust (2016-04-30)
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  • Practice Summaries: American Airlines Uses Should-Cost Modeling to Assess the Uncertainty of Bids fo - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    Ph D Don Warsing Ph D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC White Paper Library Practice Summaries American Airlines Uses Should Cost Modeling to Assess the Uncertainty of Bids for Its Full Truckload Shipment Routes By Jeffrey Stonebraker Ph D Description We used decision analysis to develop a probabilistic model to help American Airlines assess the uncertainty of bid quotes for its full truckload FTL point to point freight shipments of maintenance equipment and in flight service items in the United States The model reduced the airline s risk of overpaying an FTL supplier Authors Poole College of Management Michael J Bailey John Snapp Subramani Yetur Jeffrey S Stonebraker Steven A Edwards American Airlines Aaron Davis Robert Cox Categories SCM Resources Download White Paper Download Practice Summaries American Airlines Uses Should Cost Modeling to Assess the Uncertainty of Bids fo SCRC Author Information by Jeffrey Stonebraker Ph D Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management More about this Author Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-whitepapers/wp/practice-summaries-american-airlines-uses-should-cost-modeling-to-assess-th (2016-04-30)
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  • Introduction: Current Trends in Production Labor Sourcing - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    core departments in an effort to convert fixed overhead to variable costs Just in time inventory supply chain compression and sub contracting key processes are sourcing success stories Manufacturers of non durable goods have successfully off shored the complete manufacturing process to lower wage countries in an effort to compete globally Apparel textiles durable goods and sub components are examples of off shore industries In today s business environment every company is looking for ways to reduce costs And yet there is a limit to the savings that can be achieved through reduced inventory and lean manufacturing Most companies have leveraged their material spend to achieve savings and have undergone significant headcount reduction Many are now turning to sourcing as a weapon in the cost cutting arsenal But outsourcing is about more than shrinking budgets and reducing headcount Pursued strategically outsourcing can deliver a broad range of advantages Progressive companies are using outsourcing to Benefit from best practices Focus on core competencies Adapt to changing market conditions Rethink and actually transform the business What s appropriate for outsourcing Anything that s not core to an enterprise s business or related to its strategic direction In general functions that affect revenue generation such as product development and direct customer contact are core In the past outsourcing targeted clearly definable functions In IT for example activities like help desk security and backup and recovery became ideal candidates for outsourcing But forward thinking companies havediscovered effective waysof outsourcing entirefunctions Such businessprocess outsourcing BPO can include financialaccounting payroll andbenefits management andeven some aspects of customercare In fact the BPO marketis expected to grow atnearly a 10 percent annualrate reaching 173 billionby 2007 according toGartner a research firm IToutsourcing will expandmore slowly from 536billion to 707 billion during the same period RELEVANT SITE LINKS Outsourcing

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/introduction-current-trends-in-production-labor-sourcing (2016-04-30)
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  • Supply Chain Management Articles Library - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    Ph D Don Warsing Ph D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC Articles Library Supply Chain Management Articles Latest Supply Chain Management Articles Introduction Current Trends in Production Labor Sourcing By Robert Handfield Ph D Posted 06 01 2006 Introduction Outsourcing has become a common business practice to decrease manufacturing costs Almost every element within a manufacturing company has been analyzed for suitability and impact Leading edge manufacturers have Categories SCM Research Production Labor Sourcing Supply Chain View from the Field Blog Robert Handfield Supply Chain Management Articles Library Supply Chain Executive Training Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and Tax Primer NAICS Navigator SCM Blog Business Process Outsourcing Forecasting Healthcare Supply Management Supply Chain Analytics SCM Tutorials CPFR Forecasting Inventory Management Procurement SCM Features Hot Topics Lessons Learned Facts Figures SC Security SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Procurement Process Six Sigma SC Risk Supplier Partnerships SCM Supplier Evaluation Logistics Global Logistics Logistics Definition SCM Procurement E Procurement SCM Video Insights Library SCM Research

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/introduction-current-trends-in-production-labor-sourcing (2016-04-30)
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