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  • What attracted you to your current company? - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    MA Tracy Freeman MBA Robert Handfield Ph D Jeffrey Stonebraker Ph D Don Warsing Ph D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC Poll Library What attracted you to your current company What attracted you to your current company This poll gives some insight into the factors that attracted supply chain professionals to their current company Participate in the Poll As a supply chain professional what attracted you to your current company Check all that apply Categories Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as soon as we post them Privacy Policy Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and Tax Primer NAICS Navigator SCM Blog Business Process Outsourcing Forecasting Healthcare Supply Management Supply Chain Analytics SCM Tutorials CPFR Forecasting Inventory Management Procurement SCM Features Hot Topics Lessons Learned Facts Figures SC Security SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Procurement Process Six Sigma SC Risk Supplier Partnerships SCM Supplier Evaluation Logistics Global Logistics Logistics Definition SCM Procurement E

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-insights/poll/what-attracted-you-to-your-current-company (2016-04-30)
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  • Supply Chain Professional Development Options Through Current Employers? - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    D Jeffrey Stonebraker Ph D Don Warsing Ph D SCM Professionals SCM Research Resources SCM Pro Resources SCM Articles SCM White Papers SCM SCRC Director s Blog SCM Tutorials SCM Video Insights Library SCM Insights Polls SCM Topics SCM Research SCRC Poll Library Supply Chain Professional Development Options Through Current Employers Supply Chain Professional Development Options Through Current Employers This poll gives some insight into the professional development options available to supply chain professionals through their current employers Participate in the Poll As a supply chain professional are any of the following options made available to you and paid for by your employer Check all that apply Categories Read the Supply Chain Management Professional Newsletter Read the latest supply chain research articles and news as soon as we post them Privacy Policy Professional Resources SCM Articles SCM Resources SCM Terms Supply Chain Management Basics SCM Basics Tariffs and Tax Primer NAICS Navigator SCM Blog Business Process Outsourcing Forecasting Healthcare Supply Management Supply Chain Analytics SCM Tutorials CPFR Forecasting Inventory Management Procurement SCM Features Hot Topics Lessons Learned Facts Figures SC Security SCM Topics Inventory Management Supply Chain Procurement Process Six Sigma SC Risk Supplier Partnerships SCM Supplier Evaluation Logistics Global

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-insights/poll/supply-chain-professional-options (2016-04-30)
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  • References: An Analysis of Supplier Evaluation - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    and Materials Management 29 4 2 12 8 Evans B 2003 Going beyond e procurement InformationWeek January 20th 44 46 9 Graw L Wyatt J 2002 Getting on the e procurement bandwagon The e procurement bandwagon is rolling Contract Management 42 9 40 44 10 Handfield R Nichols E 2002 Supply chain redesign Transforming supply chains into integrated value systems Upper Saddle River NJ Financial Times Prentice Hall 11 Leenders M Fearon H PhD W England C P M 1985 Purchasing and materials management Homewood Illinois Richard D Irwin Publishing 12 Meredith J R and Scott M Shafer 2003 Introducing operations management New York NY John Wiley Sons Inc 13 Minahan T July August 2002 Sourcing technology must manage total cost Supply Chain E business http www supplychainbrain com 14 Monczka R Trent R R Handfield 1998 Purchasing and supply chain management Cincinnati Ohio South Western College Publishing 15 Patterson J September 2000 Strategic sourcing A systematic approach to supplier evaluation selection and development CAPS Research 4 1 1 6 16 Purdy L Safaveni F 2000 Strategies for supplier evaluation A framework for potential advantages and limitations IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management 47 4 435 444 17 Rahman Z Bhattachryya S 2002 Virtual organization a stratagem Singapore Management Review Volume Issue Pages 18 Saunders M 1997 Strategic purchasing supply chain management 2nd ed New York Prentice Hall 19 Schorr J 1998 Purchasing in the 21st century 2nd ed New York John Wiley Sons Inc 20 Seiderman T April 2001 XML Extreme hype or supply chain all star Supply Chain E Business http www supplychainbrain com 21 Simpson P Siguaw J and S White 2002 Measuring the performance of suppliers An analysis of evaluation processes Journal of Supply Chain Management A Global Review of Purchasing Supply 38 1 29 42 22

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/references-an-analysis-of-supplier-evaluation (2016-04-30)
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  • SC Security Articles - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    www line56 com 2 Browing J September 2000 Developing fast track policies and procedures CAPS Research 4 1 7 13 3 Carr A Categories SCM Features SC Security SCM Topics Supplier Evaluation Smart and Secure Tradelanes SST By Scott Hudson SCRC Posted 02 12 2006 Abstract An industry initiative SST was established in October of 2002 The purpose is to identify the tampering of containers while in transit using automated tracking detection and security technologies Categories SCM Features SC Security Overview of US Government Security Initiatives By Scott Hudson SCRC Posted 01 31 2006 Even before the events of 9 11 security was a priority for the United States Customs and Border Patrol CBP The following initiatives are in place to ensure the highest security Categories SCM Features SC Security Manufacturing Labor Statistics for the Peoples Republic of China By Shana Martin SCRC Posted 07 04 2005 As China provides an increasing amount of manufacturing power for the United States and other countries companies and the government like to understand the associated costs of establishing operations in Categories SCM Features SC Security RFID Container Pilot Project By Mike Johnston SCRC Posted 05 30 2005 Abstract During the first quarter of 2005 the next step in using RFID as a means of identifying and tracking merchandise at a higher level of aggregation will be tested Categories SCM Features SC Security Check Border Wait Times to Ensure On Time Delivery By Scott Hudson SCRC Posted 04 19 2005 Borders between the United States and Canada and the United States and Mexico have been strongly secured since the events of September 11 2001 The increased security will cause wait Categories SCM Features SC Security Supply Chain View from the Field Blog Robert Handfield Supply Chain Management Articles Library Supply Chain Executive Training Professional

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/all-articles/category/sc-security (2016-04-30)
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  • Future Developments: An Analysis of Supplier Evaluation - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    than any other A virtual organization is defined here as a temporary network of independents linked by integrated technology to share skills costs and access to one another s markets Rahman Bhattachryya 2002 In other words advances in technology have contributed to an increase in the outsourcing of both manufacturing and services Illustrative examples are plentiful For instance in the early 20th century Ford was the epitome of vertical integration The company made its own steel tires and parts and turned them into automobiles Throughout much of the last century many other companies were similarly interested in controlling their own destiny through vertical integration They were reluctant to use others as a resource Some companies were even focused on impossible objectives such as being world class at everything 17 Today however companies cannot afford to be second rate at anything Technology has decreased the effectiveness of many trade barriers For example at one time geographical barriers more effectively limited a customers access to the best products and services But thanks to advances in technology like the telephone today s customers are less likely to accept second best As a result researchers have suggested that vertical integration will be replaced by virtual integration 17 While these speculations may not come to fruition in the near future the simple fact that academics have made arguments of this type supports the notion that companies are increasing their dependence on outsourcing Of course along with outsourcing comes the need for evaluating the supplier Since disparate industries have distinctly different needs there are various standards upon which suppliers are evaluated For example the automotive industry s standards for supplier evaluation are different than the standards in the software industry These industries support governing bodies like the Automotive Industry Action Group AIAG and the Software Engineering Institute SEI Each organization employs industry specific techniques to evaluate the price quality and on time performance capabilities of suppliers Automotive Industry Action Group AIAG was founded in 1982 by a group of managers from Chrysler Ford and General Motors Their purpose was to provide an open forum where members cooperate in developing and promoting solutions that enhance the prosperity of the automotive industry Today AIAG s focus is to continuously improve business processes and practices involving trading partners throughout the supply chain http www aiag org Software Engineering Institute SEI was founded in 1984 by the U S Department of Defense DoD Their mission is to provide the technical leadership to advance the practice of software engineering so the DoD can acquire and sustain its software intensive systems with predictable and improved cost schedule and quality The institute s methods have been widely adopted Given the existence of the aforementioned organizations what supplier evaluation standard should a company use if it operates in the automotive industry and is outsourcing software that goes in its final product Just this one example of a complication shows the unlikelihood that one omnipotent standard for inter industry supplier evaluation will ever emerge But

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/future-developments-an-analysis-of-supplier-evaluation (2016-04-30)
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  • Case Studies: An Analysis of Supplier Evaluation - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    are regularly given report cards and rated on a gold silver or bronze status for meeting Boeing s expectations Russ Bunio vice president and general manager of supply management and procurement for BCAG says that suppliers who meet or exceed company standards are identified and recognized as preferred suppliers In turn they are rewarded by benefits such as selection preference reduced inspections industry recognition and additional business opportunities Only the very best are recognized publicly for their efforts and only a few suppliers can make it The best suppliers deliver products of flawless quality and maintain a perfect on time delivery schedule consistently introduce new technology provide Boeing with continual cost reductions work as an extension of BCAG s business and production systems and focus on teamwork risk sharing continuous improvements and win win attitudes Boeing has established a continuous cost improvement program CCIP which is designed to achieve 3 5 annual reductions in what BCAG pays for materials and parts This target could not be achieved if BCAG did not evaluate its suppliers on a continuous basis and reward the best practices The highest level of recognition is to be chosen as the supplier of the year which has a motivational intent Of the Seattle based company s 3 100 suppliers in 1999 only 116 were recognized for meeting or exceeding continuous cost improvement goals and just 13 were given supplier of the year recognition Boeing then uses a small fraction of the suppliers of the year as benchmarks against the other suppliers Only 0 5 of BCAG s suppliers were chosen recently as the hallmarks against which other suppliers are measured 22 top Top Suppliers BFG oodrich Aerospace Aerostructures Group Chula Vista Calif has been recognized for high performance in quality competitive pricing and on time deliveries The

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/case-studies-an-analysis-of-supplier-evaluation (2016-04-30)
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  • Expected Costs and Benefits: An Analysis of Supplier Evaluation - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    not only on the first delivery but on every delivery as long as the relationship lasts This conformance saves the time and money associated with counting items at the receiving dock and inspecting items for quality It therefore provides vendors with the ability to deliver directly to the manufacturing floor Quality is particularly important in a JIT system because the system is so tightly run If a vendor ships a batch of substandard parts it is likely the buyer will run out of materials before a corrected order can be received thus causing a backlog The assurance of quality minimizes the chance that defective material will initiate such a negative chain reaction In addition vendors who assure quality reduce the time and expense associated with returning materials 19 Fair price Vendors offering a fair price provide the benefit of cost reduction to the buying firm while also providing themselves with a fair profit A mutually beneficial price allows suppliers to remain profitable and continue business Firms that earn extremely low profit margins relative to their competitors are likely to either cut corners on quality or to exit the relationship There are also other benefits related to price If buyers and suppliers share pricing information whereby the elements of both company s profit margins are revealed both can reap benefits Engineers in the buying firm can assist suppliers by making cost driving processes more efficient Likewise engineers in the supplying firm can assist buyers by developing a lower cost design 19 Familiarity Selecting responsive vendors results in benefits when issues arise If a supplier knows a buyer s order has the level of expertise necessary to resolve its particular issues and is responsible for the buyer s account there will be a quick follow through and response to problems In addition buyers that know who to call and how to contact them may save time when time is of extreme importance 19 Technical capabilities Vendors offering exceptional technical capabilities provide firms with the ability to continuously improve their products in terms of quality and performance Selecting firms that are technology leaders rather than followers translates into the ability for the buying firm to be a leader in technology In addition firms that lead in technical capabilities are more likely to continually improve their products and equipment 19 Financial and business stability Selecting firms with financial and business stability increases the likelihood that the partnership will survive through tough times Firms that are financially stable are likely to offer long term relationships quality products and development services 19 Each of the above qualities provides particular benefits to a buyer Although it may be difficult or impossible to find a supplier who is the best in every category the key is to find suppliers that are the best at providing the benefits that are most important to the buying firm Therefore buying firms are likely to realize a mixture of the above benefits depending on their priorities top Costs Various costs are associated

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/expected-costs-and-benefits-an-analysis-of-supplier-evaluation (2016-04-30)
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  • Implementation Issues: An Analysis of Supplier Evaluation - SCM | Supply Chain Resource Cooperative (SCRC) | North Carolina State University
    from existing or potential suppliers Throughout this stage the team also maps current procurement processes to define the operational situation At the end of this stage a list of potential suppliers will be delivered top 4 Evaluate supplier At this stage the team develops criteria to narrow the potential supplier pool and estimates the economic and operational benefits of the project The evaluation could be implemented directly or indirectly In direct mode the team would go to suppliers to examine manufacturing and management processes and to test outputs or collect performance data In indirect mode the suppliers would be asked to provide information about manufacturing management processes and performance information such as cost quality and delivery Each mode has advantages at this stage Using the direct mode the team gets a first hand observation of processes a holistic view of supplier organization and an opportunity for active supplier development On the other hand the indirect mode fits large bureaucratic customers better Firms can get summarized product information and extensive documentation of processes This is a good method to narrow a large supplier pool 16 top 5 Select develop supplier During this stage the team calculates the actual benefits of the project and communicates them to key shareholders They then negotiate with candidates and select the optimal suppliers top 6 Implement the project At this stage the team posts related reports including expected results economic benefits project procedure and measurement of performance to all the associated business units top 7 Performance measurement and continuous improvement This stage will be performed routinely The team may require the supplier to gain certification through an appropriate standard setting body such as the International Standards Organization ISO 2 They may also use pre determined criteria to maintain performance The team communicates with suppliers whenever additional improvement is necessary to assure the procurement process is flexible enough to meet changing market conditions In addition both customers and suppliers grade suppliers performance on at least a yearly basis Similarly internal operations are evaluated Some examples of areas in which internal operations are evaluated are given below 4 Efficiency of the suppliers administrative system Are credits and rebates dealt with quickly Efficiency of the suppliers sales office Do they transmit order progress information quickly and accurately Do they immediately agree on alternatives Ability to bring new ideas Do suppliers incorporate innovations Are they are willing to work closely on research projects Assistance in solving technical problems Do suppliers respond quickly and correctly A number of people should be involved in such a project First upper level management is necessary Normally firms authorize a VP or COO to support the project Second cross functional personnel are needed to form the project team People from marketing purchasing customer service operations and finance have different perspectives and various skills to implement the project Third key investors shareholders should be involved in examining the potential benefits of implementation Finally suppliers should be urged to participate in order to build long term channel

    Original URL path: https://scm.ncsu.edu/scm-articles/article/implementation-issues-an-analysis-of-supplier-evaluation (2016-04-30)
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